Navigation Links
UCSD researchers identify potential new drug target for chronic leukemia
Date:11/24/2008

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and the Moores UCSD Cancer Center have discovered what could be a novel drug target for an often difficult-to-treat form of leukemia. The investigators have identified a unique "signature" or pattern of a specific family of enzymes in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the most common form of adult leukemia.

Paul Insel, M.D., professor of pharmacology and medicine at the UC San Diego School of Medicine and his co-workers compared white blood cells in patients with CLL to those of healthy adults. They found that one form of the group of enzymes, collectively known as cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases, was 10 times higher in CLL patients than in normal individuals. The specific type of enzyme, phosphodiesterase 7B (PDE7B), controls the levels of cyclic AMP (cAMP), a molecule that can promote programmed cell death, a process that is defective in CLL. The team reports its findings this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Whereas most cancers have out-of-control cell growth, CLL is characterized by an overabundance of white blood cells that do not die when they should, Insel explained.

The scientists subsequently tested the effects of drugs that blocked PDE7B in CLL cells, and found that this raised cAMP levels and caused CLL cells to undergo cell death. He explained that since PDE7B degrades cAMP, blocking PDE7B in essence takes the clamp off of programmed cell death, enabling CLL cells to die.

"PDE7B is thus a new drug target for CLL," he said. "We have preliminary data from patient samples studied in the laboratory showing that we can increase the killing of CLL cells even more if we block PDE7B and also add other drugs used to treat CLL."

He noted that a test for PDE7B might also potentially be used as a way to detect CLL, though this has yet to be proven. CLL, which usually strikes adults over age 35, has two major forms. One form progresses slowly, with few symptoms for years, and can be difficult to detect. The other form is more aggressive and dangerous. No one knows what makes one form different from the other. Current therapies have limited effectiveness, especially once the disease is in its aggressive phase.

The researchers are planning to screen potential drugs to treat CLL based on the PDE7B-cAMP connection. They are also exploring other potential treatment strategies to increase cAMP or disrupt its breakdown.

"We think that CLL cells may have found ways to help keep themselves alive by preventing cAMP from increasing," Insel said. "This paper provides a validation of the importance of the cAMP pathway as a target for drugs that might be used to treat CLL."


'/>"/>

Contact: Steve Benowitz
sbenowitz@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. USC researchers identify novel approach for suppressing prostate cancer development
2. Researchers identify new leprosy bacterium
3. UT Southwestern researchers develop new strategy for broad spectrum anti-viral drugs
4. Researchers discover strategy for predicting the immunity of vaccines
5. Ability to quit smoking may depend on ADHD symptoms, Columbia researchers find
6. Researchers ID Suite of Genes in Aging Process
7. Researchers: Ban on fast food TV advertising would reverse childhood obesity trends
8. Brigham and Womens Researchers Partner with Vocantas to use CallAssure in Clinical Research Study
9. Leeds researchers reshape the future of drug discovery
10. UNC researchers find clue to stopping breast-cancer metastasis
11. U of U researchers to use patients own stem cells to treat heart failure
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Many families have long-term ... long-term care insurance companies have a waiver for care if the client has a ... when the family pays for care, is often waived, so the benefits from their ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Talented host, actor Rob Lowe, ... in a new episode of "Success Files," which is an award-winning educational program ... investigates each subject in-depth with passion and integrity. , Sciatica occurs when the ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... sleep apnea using cutting-edge Oventus O2Vent technology. As many as 18 ... characterized by frequent cessation in breathing. Oral appliances can offer significant relief to ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 12, 2017 , ... Asante, a nationally recognized health system ... their existing home health joint venture through an agreement, effective October 1, 2017, ... venture home health company with Asante, delivering clinically integrated care, for the past ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 2017 , ... On Saturday, October 21, the Health & Wellness Center at ... raise money for the American Heart Association Heart Walk. Teams of up to 10 ... to keep their treadmills moving for 5 hours. Treadmills will start at 7:00 p.m. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/4/2017)... 2017 OBP Medical , a ... devices, today announced regulatory approval from ... Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA)) to market ... retractor with integrated LED light source and smoke ... exposure of a tissue pocket or cavity during ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... 2017  Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: ... third quarter of 2017 on Tuesday, October 24, 2017. ... day with the investment community and media to further ... call will begin at 9 a.m. Eastern time. Investors, ... webcast of the conference call through a link that ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... , Oct. 2, 2017 Halo Labs announces the European ... system called the HORIZON at MIBio 2017 in Cambridge, ... and visible particulate matter in biopharmaceutical samples with unprecedented speed and ... the novel technique Backgrounded Membrane Imaging. ... The HORIZON subvisible particle analysis system ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: