Navigation Links
UCLA study suggests link between untreated depression, response to shingles vaccine
Date:2/19/2013

Can an individual's state of mind effect how well a vaccine may work? In the case of seniors and shingles, the answer is yes.

Reporting in the current online edition of the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, Dr. Michael Irwin, a professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, demonstrates a link between untreated depression in older adults and decreased effectiveness of the herpes zoster or shingles vaccine.

Shingles is a painful, blistering skin rash that can last for months or even years. It's caused by the varicellazoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox. It's thought to strike more than a million people over the age of 60 each year in the U.S.

Every year, health officials urge individuals 50 and older to get vaccinated against the virus. The vaccine boosts cell-mediated immunity to the virus and can decrease the incidence and severity of the condition.

But in a two-year study, Irwin, the first author of the research and director of the UCLA Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology, and his colleagues measured immune responses to the shingles vaccination among 40 people aged 60 or older who suffered from a major depressive disorder and compared these responses to similar levels in 52 control patients matched by age and gender. Measurements were taken at the beginning of the study, and then at six weeks, one year and two years after the patients received either the shingles vaccine or a placebo.

Depressed patients not being treated with antidepressants showed a weaker immune response to the varicellazoster virus and thus were less able to respond to the shingles vaccine than patients who were not depressed and patients who suffered from depression but werereceiving treatment with antidepressants.

The findings suggest that patients with untreated depression were "poorly protected by the shingles vaccination," Irwin said.

Surprisingly, when the depression was being treated, responses to the vaccine were normalized, even when the depression treatment had not been effective in lessening the symptoms of depression.

"Among depressed elderly, treatment with an antidepressant medication such as a selective serotonin uptake inhibitor might increase the protective effects of zoster vaccine," said Irwin.

Larger studies are needed to evaluate the possible relationship between untreated depression and the risk of shingles, the study noted, along with further research to establish what mechanisms are responsible for patients' reduced immune response.

And there is a clinical side as well, Irwin noted. "Efforts are also needed to identify and diagnose depressed elderly patients who might benefit from either a more potent vaccine or a multi-dose vaccination schedule." he said.

The findings have important public health implications beyond the prevention of shingles, possibly extending to other infectious diseases, Irwin said. Because this study measured immune system T cells that were specific to the varicellazoster virus, the association may extend to T cells specific for antigens of other pathogens that cause disease in older adults, such as influenza.

If so, Irwin said, this suggests that untreated depression may identify a sub-group of elderly likely to respond poorly to other vaccines.

"While we know that psychological stress is associated with a weakened immune response to influenza vaccines in older adults, few studies have examined the association between depression and infectious disease risk, or disease-relevant immunologic endpoints, such as vaccine responses," he said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Mark Wheeler
mwheeler@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2265
University of California - Los Angeles
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Study shows reduced risk of preterm birth for pregnant women vaccinated during pandemic flu
2. Too Much Coffee in Pregnancy Tied to Smaller, Later Newborns, Study Says
3. Early Exposure to Gluten May Help Babies Avoid Celiac Risk: Study
4. CWRU study examines family struggles with anger and forgiveness when relative is dying
5. Emerging SARS-Like Virus Well-Suited to Attack Humans: Study
6. DrugRisk Pradaxa Update: Litigation Grows As New Study Adds to Risks
7. A New Study by CogniFit Finds That Young Men Have a Strong Cognitive Advantage Over Young Women
8. Baby wash does not damage babys skin barrier function, study finds
9. Study suggests women have higher risk of hip implant failure
10. Study suggests reduced lung function in infancy associated with wheeze later
11. Doctors fail to communicate impact of heart devices with patients, SLU study finds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/11/2016)... Alpharetta, Georgia (PRWEB) , ... February 11, 2016 ... ... Physicians Group (DMPG) will use the action analytics leader’s population health solutions, ... analytics and clinical support to the Atlanta-area healthcare system. Details of the contract ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... ... wide range of cosmetic procedures. Along with performing procedures, the magazine also highlights ... of many cosmetic procedures. One of the most common procedures he performs is ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... Image One USA veteran ... market, and it’s the buildings of Nashville that will benefit. , “I’ve enjoyed being ... relocate to Nashville, there was no question that I would bring my business with ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... Hall Integrative Health ... up for their simultaneous grand openings in March. All seven practices are set ... probably wondering, is reversing diabetes possible? According to this 2011 CNN article it ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 11, 2016 , ... ... Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Dallas plastic surgeon , Dr. Rod J. Rohrich, ... rhinoplasty surgery . Dr. Rohrich outlines recommendations for rhinoplasty surgeons when addressing this ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/11/2016)... -- Walgreens has committed to provide drug disposal kiosks ... D.C. as part of a program to combat ... advocacy organization As You Sow. Conrad MacKerron , ... on to unneeded drugs because they lack easily accessible collection ... --> Conrad MacKerron , Senior Vice President at As ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... 11, 2016   Health 2.0 , the premiere ... technologies, announced today " 10 Year Global Retrospective ", ... over the past ten years.   ... Health 2.0 has served as the preeminent thought-leader in ... thousands of technologies, companies, innovators, and patient-activists through an ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , Feb. 11, 2016  NOIT™ Research LLC, a ... "Gift of Change" campaign to assist needy families in ... such unit sold between February 10, 2016 and March ... a needy family. The NOIT is an auditory stimulus ... individuals develop language skills. Beth Shier ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: