Navigation Links
UCLA researchers use 'nano-Velcro' technology to improve capture of circulating cancer cells
Date:3/7/2011

Circulating tumor cells, which play a crucial role in cancer metastasis, have been known to science for more than 100 years, and researchers have long endeavored to track and capture them. Now, a UCLA research team has developed an innovative device based on Velcro-like nanoscale technology to efficiently identify and "grab" these circulating tumor cells, or CTCs, in the blood.

Metastasis is the most common cause of cancer-related death in patients with solid tumors and occurs when these marauding tumor cells leave the primary tumor site and travel through the blood stream to set up colonies in other parts of the body.

The current gold standard for determining the disease status of tumors involves the invasive biopsy of tumor samples, but in the early stages of metastasis, it is often difficult to identify a biopsy site. By capturing CTCs in blood samples, doctors can essentially perform a "liquid" biopsy, allowing for early detection and diagnosis, as well as improved monitoring of cancer progression and treatment responses.

In a study published this month and featured on the cover of the journal Angewandte Chemie, the UCLA researchers announce the successful demonstration of this "nano-Velcro" technology, which they engineered into a 2.5-by-5centimeter microfluidic chip. This second-generation CTC-capture technology was shown to be capable of highly efficient enrichment of rare CTCs captured in blood samples collected from prostate cancer patients.

The new approach could be even faster and cheaper than existing methods, and it captures a greater number of CTCs, the researchers said.

The prostate cancer patients were recruited with the help of a clinical team led by physicians Dr. Matthew Rettig, of the UCLA Department of Urology, and Dr. Jiaoti Huang, of the UCLA Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine.

The new CTC enrichment technology is based on the research team's earlier development of 'fly-paper' technology, outlined in a 2009 paper in Angewandte Chemie. The technology involves a nanopillar-covered silicon chip whose "stickiness" resulted from the interaction between the nanopillars and nanostructures on CTCs known as microvilli, creating an effect much like the top and bottom of Velcro.

The new, second-generation device adds an overlaid microfluidic channel to create a fluid flow path that increases mixing. In addition to the Velcro-like effect from the nanopillars, the mixing produced by the microfluidic channel's architecture causes the CTCs to have greater contact with the nanopillar-covered floor, further enhancing the device's efficiency.

"The device features high flow of the blood samples, which travel at increased (lightning) speed," said senior study author Dr. Hsian-Rong Tseng, an associate professor of molecular and medical pharmacology at the UCLA Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging and the California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA.

"The cells bounce up and down inside the channel and get slammed against the surface and get caught," explained Dr. Clifton Shen, another study author.

The advantages of the new device are significant. The CTC-capture rate is much higher, and the device is easier to handle than its first-generation counterpart. It also features a more user-friendly, semi-automated interface that improves upon the earlier device's purely manual operation.

"This new CTC technology has the potential to be a powerful new tool for cancer researchers, allowing them to study cancer evolution by comparing CTCs with the primary tumor and the distant metastases that are most often lethal," said Dr. Kumaran Duraiswamy, a graduate of UCLA Anderson School of Management who became involved in the project while in school. "When it reaches the clinic in the future, this CTC-analysis technology could help bring truly personalized cancer treatment and management."


'/>"/>

Contact: Jennifer Marcus
jmarcus@cnsi.ucla.edu
310-267-4839
University of California - Los Angeles
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Researchers map all the fragile sites of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiaes genome
2. UH Case Medical Center researchers publish promising findings for advanced cervical cancer
3. Researchers discover new way to kill pediatric brain tumors
4. Researchers Who Discovered First Genes for Stuttering will Present Findings to the National Stuttering Association
5. Researchers create drug to keep tumor growth switched off
6. Urine protein test might help diagnose kidney damage from lupus, UT Southwestern researchers find
7. GUMC researchers say flower power may reduce resistance to breast cancer drug tamoxifen
8. Clemson researchers develop hands-free texting application
9. Researchers find biomarkers in saliva for detection of early-stage pancreatic cancer
10. Researchers chart genomic map spanning over 2 dozen cancers
11. Researchers discover second protective role for tumor-suppressor
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... 05, 2016 , ... Freed-Hardeman University President Joe A. Wiley ... joint enrollment and degree completion agreement. The agreement, which begins with the ... FHU|Dickson. , The agreement allows students to be jointly admitted to both ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... 05, 2016 , ... The American public tends to feel uncomfortable about drinking ... regular municipal or well water. The recent experience with lead contaminated water in Flint, ... long way toward increasing public acceptance of recycled waste water as drinking water. ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... , ... At its annual meeting held last week, the American Parkinson Disease ... of Directors. Mr. McDermott succeeds former APDA Chairman, Fred Greene. , "We are pleased ... APDA President and CEO. “Pat has tirelessly served APDA since 2001 when he was ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... IL (PRWEB) , ... February 05, 2016 , ... In ... disguised form as a dream. A hallmark feature of patients with eating disorders is ... needs. The eating disorder behaviors and obsessions are regarded as maladaptive means for coping ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... KICVentures ( http://www.kicventures.com ... Development event in New York City on Thursday, January 21, 2016. Kingsley ... Mediacom, (both alumnus of the varsity Columbia soccer program) spoke at the event, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/5/2016)... HARROGATE, England , February 5, 2016 ... --> Today, VoicePower Ltd - The Speech Recognition People, ... has been deployed to improve patient care, reduce turnaround times and ... ,- Wirral CCG ,- VoicePower client since 2013 Challenge: ... Challenge: --> - Six doctors ,- Wirral ...
(Date:2/4/2016)...  Edwards Lifesciences Corporation (NYSE: EW ), the ... and critical care monitoring, announced today that it has ... Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC to repurchase $325 million ... the Company,s previously authorized program to repurchase up to ... --> --> Under the ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... FOSTER CITY, Calif. , Feb. 4, 2016 ... (the "Company") today announced it has entered into ... and Exchange Commission (SEC) fully resolving the SEC,s ... Practices Act (FCPA).  Under the terms of the ... total of $12.8 million, including disgorgement, pre-judgment interest ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: