Navigation Links
UCLA-led study identifies genetic factors involved in pediatric ulcerative colitis

UCLA researchers were part of a team that has discovered the interplay of several genetic factors that may be involved in the development of early-onset ulcerative colitis, a severe type of inflammatory bowel disease.

The early research findings in mice suggest possible new targets for prevention and treatment strategies to address the inflammation generated by early-onset ulcerative colitis. The rare disease affects infants and young children and can lead to early development of colon cancer and an increased risk of liver damage.

Scientists from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and Pusan National University in South Korea also created a first-of-its-kind animal model that mimics early-onset ulcerative colitis and can be used to help test new drug candidates to treat the disease. Their findings are published in the online edition of the peer-reviewed journal Gastroenterology.

"We hope that identifying these key genetic factors and providing a unique research model will help lead to new approaches to treat early-onset ulcerative colitis, a devastating disease that currently has no cure," said Dr. Sang Hoon Rhee, the study's senior author and an associate adjunct professor of medicine in the Division of Digestive Diseases at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

Although inflammatory bowel disease can occur at any age, approximately 25 percent of cases develop in people 18 years or younger, some of whom have early-onset ulcerative colitis. Those who develop the disease at such a young age are at a higher risk of developing colon cancer. They also have an increased risk for liver damage because the inflammation caused by the disease leads to a narrowing of the bile ducts that connect to the liver.

Previous studies had shown that the activity of a strong anti-inflammatory protein called interleukin 10, which cools down the inflammatory responses in the body, is diminished in people with early-onset ulcerative colitis.

"We knew that interleukin 10 played a role," said Dr. Eunok Im, an assistant professor at Pusan National University's School of Pharmacy and the study's first author. "But recent clinical and experimental evidence indicated that in addition to this protein's crippled action, there may be other genetic factors at work causing early onset of this disease."

The team found that phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), a protein that plays an important role in cell functions like growth and communication, might also work in concert with interleukin 10 in helping ulcerative colitis to develop.

Scientists also discovered that, among mice that do not have interleukin 10, the additional loss of the PTEN gene in the intestine caused extensive inflammation, severe colitis and colon cancer development at very early ages as early as one month after birth and that they develop symptoms and early-onset ulcerative colitis in much the same way that humans do.

As a result, according to researchers, those mice may be an invaluable tool for testing possible new treatments for ulcerative colitis.

The team also found that the loss of PTEN in the intestine disrupted antibacterial activity and altered the colon's bacterial diversity. There was a large increase in a specific group of bacteria called Bacteroides, which have the ability to trigger massive inflammatory responses that cause various inflammatory diseases.

Using both genetic and pharmacological interventions, the researchers inhibited the Bacteroides' ability to trigger inflammatory responses, which greatly reduced the occurrence of early-onset ulcerative colitis in the mice. The results could eventually point the way toward new approaches to treat or prevent ulcerative colitis in humans.

"Future study may help us better understand how this bacteria has the potential to elicit inflammation in the colon and explore the molecular mechanisms of how the bacteria impacts disease onset," said Dr. Charalabos "Harry" Pothoulakis, another author of the study and a professor of medicine in the division of digestive diseases. Pothoulakis holds the Eli and Edythe L. Broad Chair in Inflammatory and Bowel Disease at UCLA and is the director of the UCLA Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

Contact: Rachel Champeau
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Related medicine news :

1. Blood test serves as crystal ball for heart transplant patients, UCLA-led study finds
2. UCLA-led team may have found key to cause of Cushing disease
3. UCLA-led project aimed at African American couples affected by HIV gets $2.5 million boost
4. Study finds wide gap in compensation from 07 South Korean oil spill
5. Dr. Mark Glasgold Publishes Influential Graft Study
6. E-Cigarette Vapor May Be Less Toxic Than Tobacco Smoke: Study
7. Complication Rates Low With Mastectomy, Breast Reconstruction: Study
8. Obesity Fueling Rise in Diabetes Rates, Study Finds
9. ADHD Medications Wont Stunt Kids Growth, Study Finds
10. Nerve Blocking Procedure Fails to Impress in Weight Loss Study
11. Booze, Pot Bad for Teens in Different Ways, Study Suggests
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
UCLA-led study identifies genetic factors involved in pediatric ulcerative colitis
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... ... Vereb has been named the organization’s Executive Vice President of Operations, and three ... to key leadership roles in the company. , Debbie Vereb’s appointment to Executive ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2015 , ... ... technologies and development solutions for drugs, biologics, consumer health and animal health products, ... Technology, and will lead a new, dedicated global team of drug development and ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2015 , ... According to an article published ... from adults today versus those of a similar group taken in 1988 has shown that ... a person in 2008 with the same diet as someone in 1971 would be on ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... ... October 12, 2015 , ... The American Society of Clinical ... professional education and clinical training in a health care discipline. , Many ... such as: losing weight, managing pain, or stopping smoking, etc. Frequently, extravagant statements ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... ... October 12, 2015 , ... AcousticSheep LLC, creators of the ... honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. During the month of October, for ... SleepPhones® Classic product to a breast cancer patient at the Cleveland Clinic. , ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2015)... Oct. 12, 2015  Millions of smokers worldwide have ... shackles of tobacco. An April 2015 study ... London showed electronic cigarettes to be up to 95 ... than a decade after the technology was first introduced ... --> --> ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... , Oct. 12, 2015 About epilepsy ... to a spectrum of brain disorders manifested by benign ... by factors ranging from brain malformations and tumors to ... underlying cause of the disease is unidentified, as is ... as idiopathic epilepsy. An imbalance between the inhibitory and ...
(Date:10/12/2015)... , October 12, 2015 --> ... report "Spirometer Market by Product (Hand-held, Table-top, Desktop), Technology (Volume ... Application, & Geography - Global Forecast to 2020", published by ... Million by 2020, at a CAGR of 9.8% from 2015 ... 128 F igures spread th rough 187 P ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: