Navigation Links
UCI team discovers how protein in teardrops annihilates harmful bacteria
Date:1/19/2012

Irvine, Calif. A disease-fighting protein in our teardrops has been tethered to a tiny transistor, enabling UC Irvine scientists to discover exactly how it destroys dangerous bacteria. The research could prove critical to long-term work aimed at diagnosing cancers and other illnesses in their very early stages.

Ever since Nobel laureate Alexander Fleming found that human tears contain antiseptic proteins called lysozymes about a century ago, scientists have tried to solve the mystery of how they could relentlessly wipe out far larger bacteria. It turns out that lysozymes have jaws that latch on and chomp through rows of cell walls like someone hungrily devouring an ear of corn, according to findings that will be published Jan. 20 in the journal Science.

"Those jaws chew apart the walls of the bacteria that are trying to get into your eyes and infect them," said molecular biologist and chemistry professor Gregory Weiss, who co-led the project with associate professor of physics & astronomy Philip Collins.

The researchers decoded the protein's behavior by building one of the world's smallest transistors 25 times smaller than similar circuitry in laptop computers or smartphones. Individual lysozymes were glued to the live wire, and its eating activities were monitored.

"Our circuits are molecule-sized microphones," Collins said. "It's just like a stethoscope listening to your heart, except we're listening to a single molecule of protein."

It took years for the UCI scientists to assemble the transistor and attach single-molecule teardrop proteins. The scientists hope the same novel technology can be used to detect cancerous molecules. It could take a decade to figure out, but would be well worth it, said Weiss, who lost his father to lung cancer.

"If we can detect single molecules associated with cancer, then that means we'd be able to detect it very, very early," Weiss said. "That would be very exciting, because we know that if we treat cancer early, it will be much more successful, patients will be cured much faster, and costs will be much less."


'/>"/>

Contact: Janet Wilson
janethw@uci.edu
949-824-3969
University of California - Irvine
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. URI pharmacy researcher discovers new gene that regulates body weight
2. UCSF-led team discovers cause of rare disease
3. Team discovers how a cancer-causing bacterium spurs cell death
4. 23andMe discovers genetic variant that may protect those at risk for Parkinsons disease
5. Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center research discovers key to survival of brain cells
6. UNH researcher discovers research manipulated to support pro-eugenic beliefs
7. Research discovers genetic link to Barretts esophagus, esophageal cancer
8. Expert discovers simple method of dealing with harmful radioactive iodine
9. UCSF team discovers key to fighting drug-resistant leukemia
10. UCSF team discovers new way to predict breast cancer survival and enhance effectiveness of treatment
11. OHSU Doernbecher discovers new approach to drug resistance in aggressive childhood cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/27/2016)... SC (PRWEB) , ... May 27, 2016 , ... ... a line of classic American timber frame barn kits, which can be found on ... are inspired by historic American barn plans, and they highlight the craftsmanship of timber ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... An influential resource amongst ... third time to shed lights on the variety of topics detailing why we appreciate ... Appreciation” tackles why this career has gone from being in a major recession to ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... ... installment is bolstered by inspiring human-interest stories, courtesy of awareness-driven celebrities and thought ... industry, from leading advocates, associations and industry leaders such as Bioness. , ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... Aimed at nurses ... human interest stories, courtesy of leaders in the nursing and health care industry. ... from leading advocates and associations—namely Jones & Bartlett Learning. , Jones & Bartlett ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... ... With a team of certified experts, Validation Center is ... GMP accreditation, Validation Center is also a registered authority of the international system ... Validation Center is ISO17025 accredited and only offers its clients the latest technology, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/27/2016)... LabStyle Innovations Corp . ( NASDAQ: DRIO ... that the Company,s Chief Financial Officer, Zvi Ben-David ... 1-2 in New York, NY and ... Los Angeles, CA. During his ... including the U.S. FDA Clearance and commercial launch of the ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... Kitov Pharmaceuticals ... late-stage drug development, today announced the completion of ... batches required for registration of KIT-302 with the ... Kitov,s announcement in December 2015, that ... primary efficacy endpoint. "We are fortunate ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... -- According to a new market report published ... Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecast 2015 - ... valued at US$ 5.89 Bn in 2014 and is anticipated ... 2023 to reach US$ 7.99 Bn in 2023. ... free drug delivery devices and the market is estimated based ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: