Navigation Links
UC San Diego researchers identify factor boosting leukemia's aggressiveness
Date:10/22/2010

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells survive and thrive not just by their own innate wiles, but by also acquiring aid and support from host cells in their surrounding environment. In a paper published online this week in The Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences, an international team of researchers led by cancer specialists at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine and the Moores UCSD Cancer Center identify a particular relationship that can promote notably aggressive leukemias and lymphomas.

"The microenvironment is the term used to describe the cells that cluster around CLL cells in the lymph nodes, spleen and bone marrow. These cells secrete factors that can protect CLL cells from dying," said Thomas J. Kipps, MD, PhD, Evelyn and Edwin Tasch Chair in Cancer Research, Professor of Medicine, Deputy Director of Research Operations at the Rebecca and John Moores UCSD Cancer Center and senior co-author of the paper with Michael Karin, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology in UCSD's Laboratory of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction.

Kipps, Karin and colleagues from Iowa, The Netherlands and Taiwan looked specifically at a protein called B-cell activating factor or BAFF, which is produced in high levels by "nurselike cells" in the CLL microenvironment. Nurselike cells are a subset of blood cells in CLL patients that help cancer cells avoid apoptosis or natural cell death. Kipps and colleagues first described this relationship in 2000.

The researchers found that BAFF interacts with a gene linked to leukemogenesis the development of leukemia called c-MYC. Normal MYC genes help regulate cell proliferation, but when upregulated or increased by mutations, c-MYC can promote more aggressive leukemias and lymphomas. To what degree this relationship influences CLL the most common form of adult leukemia remains unknown, though Kipps said the findings suggest therapeutic promise.

"We found that BAFF can upregulate expression of c-MYC in CLL cells and that patients who have CLL cells with high levels of c-MYC have aggressive disease," said Kipps. "These findings may lead to improvements in our ability to treat patients with CLL, either by blocking the effect of BAFF on CLL cells or inhibiting the signaling pathways triggered by BAFF that can lead to upregulation of MYC."


'/>"/>

Contact: Scott Lafee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California -- San Diego
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. La Jolla Institute to develop San Diegos first center for RNAi genomics research
2. UC San Diego partners with Mozambique University to deliver quality health care
3. UC San Diego researcher awarded $3.8 million for new path to breast cancer therapy
4. Type 1 diabetes research at UC San Diego gets $5 million boost
5. UC San Diegos Karin receives prestigious Harvey Prize
6. APA presents latest research on same-sex marriage at annual convention in San Diego
7. UC San Diego researchers find cause of metabolic disease -- and possible cure
8. UC San Diego receives major clinical and translational science award
9. UC San Diego to lead new malaria research center in South America
10. World Renowned Total Artificial Heart Pioneer Dr. Jack Copeland Joins Faculty at UC San Diego
11. Nurtur Unveils the Third Dimension in Healthcare at SHRM 2010 Conference in San Diego
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... ... Discover the Rocky Mountain region’s longest running and impressive garden and home show ... to see the most incredible gardens and home improvement experts that attend this amazing ... Center - 700 14th St. Denver CO, is an exciting event that Performance Mobility ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 08, 2016 , ... ... Inc., will be speaking on how healthcare companies can use newly released government ... the health of a population and intervene and capture the value they create ...
(Date:2/7/2016)... Metamora, Michigan (PRWEB) , ... February 07, 2016 ... ... pelvic organ prolapse with the latest techniques and the most minimally invasive approaches. ... pelvic organ prolapse, particularly after menopause. Other risk factors include surgery to the ...
(Date:2/6/2016)... ... February 06, 2016 , ... FOR INFORMATION: ... AORN SURGICAL CONFERENCE & EXPO , WHAT:     , This conference is the ... perioperative nurses in attendance to study the latest evidence-based recommendations and resources ...
(Date:2/6/2016)... Pekin, IL (PRWEB) , ... February 06, 2016 ... ... the recovery phases of eating disorder treatment helps to reduce the frequency and ... “Tasks of the Recovery Phase: Re-Establishing Healthy Identity and Purpose,” will explore the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/8/2016)... DIEGO , Feb. 8, 2016 /PRNewswire/--  Cell ... announced that advanced tissue-engineering services are now available ... a groundbreaking new three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting approach called ... 3D Bio Printer , a state-of-the-art robotic system ... has created a powerful pay-for-service bio-printing model that ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... , Feb. 8, 2016 ... addition of the "Label-Free Detection Market ... to 2020" report to their offering. ... the addition of the "Label-Free Detection ... Forecasts to 2020" report to their ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... Pharma Inc. President and Chief Executive Officer Yoshihiko Hatanaka ... as president, Americas Operations, for Astellas US LLC, with responsibility ... America , effective April 1, 2016.  Robinson previously served ... the United States -- a role ... who is retiring in June 2016.  --> ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: