Navigation Links
U of M researchers develop a molecular 'calcium sponge' to tackle heart failure
Date:2/10/2013

MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL (February 10, 2013) Researchers at the University of Minnesota's Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology and the Lillehei Heart Institute have utilized molecular genetic engineering to optimize heart performance in models of diastolic heart failure by creating an optimized protein that can aid in high-speed relaxation similar to fast twitching muscles.

Within heart cells, calcium plays a major role in orchestrating normal heart pump function. However, in diastolic failure the calcium signaling process is slowed; calcium levels rise to the peak needed for the squeezing action of the heart but don't then drop quickly enough for an efficient relaxation period the condition known as diastolic heart failure.

University researchers were able to pinpoint a specific protein, parvalbumin which aids in high-speed relaxation of fast twitching muscles in nature and optimize it to become a calcium sponge for heart muscle. As a result, the optimized protein, ParvE101Q, soaks up excess calcium at a precise instant, allowing the heart to relax efficiently after contraction.

The advance offers a solid conceptual step forward in solving the puzzle of diastolic heart failure. The next step will be determining the best possible small molecule or gene delivery mechanism for the protein, which should allow the discovery to be used in clinics.

Their approach is outlined in the latest issue of Nature Medicine.

"In nature, there are unique organisms known to be able to contract and relax muscles quickly," said Joseph M. Metzger, Ph.D., a University of Minnesota Medical School professor and chair of the Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology. "We hoped research and discovery could help identify what was promoting this highly efficient activity so we could harness it for use in the heart. We've discovered that our optimized variation of parvalbumin can fulfill that role by treating diastolic heart failure."

According to Metzger, who also serves as the Maurice B. Visscher Endowed Chair in Physiology, the sponge mechanism works as a temporary depot for calcium along its normal pathway. It increases productivity in the relaxation phase of the heart cycle without negatively impacting the contracting phase.

If they can develop an ideal delivery system for the optimized protein, the researchers believe they may have found a unique clinical application to treat diastolic heart failure. Heart failure is a common killer of both men and women across the country and the rate of heart failure is increasing as our population ages and as the survival rate after recovery from first heart attack goes up.

"Heart disease and heart failure rates are growing, especially as our population ages. We hope this type of discovery may one day help pave the way to a better way to treat patients," said Metzger.


'/>"/>

Contact: Caroline Marin
crmarin@umn.edu
612-624-5680
University of Minnesota Academic Health Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. UIC researchers to study how young adults use e-cigarettes, snus
2. Cancer Drug Doesnt Speed Up Tumor Growth, Researchers Say
3. UAB researchers cure type 1 diabetes in dogs
4. University of Minnesota researchers discover enzyme behind breast cancer mutations
5. Yale researchers spot attention deficits in babies who later develop autism
6. Researchers use new molecular inhibitors to successfully hit difficult cancer target
7. Researchers discover mutations linked to relapse of childhood leukemia
8. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers develop automated breast density test linked to cancer risk
9. Leading researchers warn of brain drain as scientists struggle to find funding
10. Researchers Identify Involuntary Tobacco Smoke Exposure in Boston Public Housing Authority Residents with Salivary Cotinine Testing from Salimetrics.
11. Researchers help confirm value of flow-diverting device for most challenging aneurysms
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/2/2016)... AL (PRWEB) , ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... from across the Dothan-Wiregrass Area in Alabama are expected to attend the UNCF ... Schmitz, will help provide scholarship funds for area students and operating support to ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... 02, 2016 , ... The annual time frame to change Medicare health and ... ending December 7th. Currently-enrolled Medicare beneficiaries who are looking to switch from their current ... need to make changes during this period order for their new policy to go ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... surgeon in Beverly Hills, California, will be included in the 2016 “Guide to ... to exceptional professionals based on the amalgamation of their education, experience, and professional ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... 02, 2016 , ... The PAINWeekEnd Regional Conference will be ... in Honolulu, offering local frontline clinicians the opportunity to extend their certified continuing ... for supplemental training related to pain management has surged dramatically in recent years, ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... , ... December 02, 2016 , ... Yisrayl Hawkins, at ... into how this current generation fits into Bible Prophecy. Yisrayl says this generation, known ... pointing to this conclusion, showing how the details line up exactly with Bible Prophecy ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/2/2016)... On Thursday, the NASDAQ Composite ended the trading ... edged 0.36% higher, to finish at 19,191.93; and the S&P ... as six out of nine sectors ended the day in ... Services equities: Myriad Genetics Inc. (NASDAQ: MYGN ), ... Inc. (NASDAQ: INCR ), and La Quinta Holdings ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... 1, 2016 The concept of rare diseases and ... to this sector has been taking shape in ... political aspects and initiatives related to orphan medicinal products have ... level of member states individually. Many member states in the ... space of orphan medicinal products, the result of which took ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... 2016 Around the corners of world, cancer ... habitable land present over earth. Cancer has become one ... a life time this is because of the increasing ... Given the steady increase in global cancer incidence with ... healthcare costs of treatment, there is increasing interest in ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: