Navigation Links
U.S. Spending on Mental Health Care Soaring
Date:8/5/2009

Rate of increase now outstrips that for heart disease, cancer, data shows

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. spending on mental illness is soaring at a faster pace than spending on any other health care category, new government data released Wednesday shows.

The cost of treating mental disorders rose sharply between 1996 and 2006, from $35 billion (in 2006 dollars) to almost $58 billion, according to the report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

At the same time, the report showed, the number of Americans who sought treatment for depression, bipolar disorder and other mental health woes almost doubled, from 19 million to 36 million.

The new statistics come on the heels of a study, released Monday, that found antidepressant use among U.S. residents almost doubled between a similar time frame, 1996 and 2005.

Spending on mental illness showed a faster rate of growth over the 10-year period analyzed than costs for heart disease, cancer, trauma-linked disorders, and asthma.

According to the report, spending on heart disease rose from $72 billion in 1996 to $78 billion in 2006; cancer care rose from $47 billion to $58 billion; asthma costs climbed from $36 billion to $51 billion, and expenditures for trauma-related care rose from $46 billion to $68 billion.

In terms of per-patient costs, cancer led the way at $5,178 in 2006 (up slightly from $5,067 in 1996), while costs for trauma care and asthma rose sharply -- from $1,220 to $1,953 and from $863 to $1,059, respectively.

On the other hand, average per-patient spending for heart conditions fell, from $4,333 to $3,964. And spending on mental disorders declined from $1,825 to $1,591.

In the Monday study, published in the Archives of General Psychiatry, researchers reported that 10.12 percent of U.S. residents aged 6 and over, or 27 million people, were using antidepressants in 2005, compared to 5.84 percent, or 13.3 million people, in 1996.

The increase seemed to span virtually all demographic groups.

"This is a 20-year trend and it's very powerful," remarked Dr. Eric Caine, chair of the department of psychiatry and co-director of the Center for the Study of Prevention of Suicide at the University of Rochester Medical Center.

More information

For information on mental health issues, head to the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health.



-- E.J. Mundell



SOURCES: Aug. 5, 2009, news release, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; August 2009, Archives of General Psychiatry; Eric Caine, M.D., chair, department of psychiatry, and co-director, Center for the Study of Prevention of Suicide, University of Rochester Medical Center, N.Y.


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Study finds drug spending caps cause some seniors to quit taking key medicines
2. Medicare Spending Caps Cause Seniors to Stop Meds
3. United States continues to have highest level of health spending
4. Study finds drug spending caps cause some seniors to quit taking key medicines
5. Spending more for lung cancer treatment did not substantially increase patients lives
6. New Records & Information Management: Are You Spending Right on Records Management, Data Security and Compliance?
7. Blunt: Democrats Flawed Spending Compromise
8. Tis the Season ... to Utilize Your Flexible Spending Account on Vision Care
9. Retirees spending freely
10. Health care savings, coverage for all could lower spending $1.5 trillion over 10 years
11. Statement by American Heart Association Immediate-Past President Raymond Gibbons, M.D. on Congressional Omnibus Spending Bill
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
U.S. Spending on Mental Health Care Soaring
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... 06, 2016 , ... Specialty Technical Publishers (STP) and Specialty ... Consortium (IAPC) EHS audit protocol for Great Britain . Leading companies around ... EHS regulatory obligations and rapidly collect, share, archive, and export audit findings in ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... , ... December 06, 2016 , ... ... to "Training" magazine’s 2017 Training Top 125 for their industry leading training methods ... annual award recognizes USA as among the global elite in employer-sponsored training and ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... ... December 05, 2016 , ... The ... care facility – Avamere Transitional Care of Puget Sound ; located at ... health care center will provide patients recovering from illness or injury with intensive ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... ... December 05, 2016 , ... Researchers at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital want ... athletes. Over the course of three years, researchers will study concussions and changes in ... guards, equipped with special sensors, will track the location and force of the hit. ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... December 05, 2016 , ... ... Keynote speaker for the 21st Annual International Congress on Hematologic Malignancies®: Focus on ... PER® president, Phil Talamo said, “We are honored to have Amy E. Herman ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/5/2016)... Sanovas, Inc., a life science asset holding company ... wholly owned subsidiary, Intubation Science, Inc., and its LightSpeed Intubation ... http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20161202/445251LOGO   ... Sanovas, Inc. ... There are over 40 million Endotracheal Intubations performed annually ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... Health and Gateway Health proudly announce a dynamic collaboration that ... plan members with specific high risk needs. In ... group of consumers, Wellbridge combines technology and population expertise with ... members, daily behaviors and lifestyle. ... , , ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... Dec. 5, 2016  Recently Zymo Research announced ... predictor, known as Horvath,s Clock. Based on this ... analysis service to academic and biopharma scientific researchers ... sample, other than sperm. The service ... biological age versus chronological age following drug treatments ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: