Navigation Links
U.S. Must Do More to Cut Cases of Environmental Cancers
Date:5/6/2010

President's Cancer Panel report urges more public awareness of harm from common chemicals

THURSDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- The United States is not doing enough to reduce the incidence of environmentally induced cancers, a risk that has been "grossly underestimated," a special report released Thursday by the President's Cancer Panel shows.

In particular, the authors pointed to the apparent health effects of 80,000 or so chemicals, including bisphenol A (BPA), that are used daily by millions of Americans. Studies have linked BPA with different types of cancer, at least in animal and laboratory tests.

"The real burden of environmentally induced cancer greatly underestimates exposure to carcinogens [and] is not addressed adequately by the National Cancer Program," said Dr. LaSalle D. Leffall Jr., chair of the panel and Charles R. Drew professor of surgery at Howard University College of Medicine in Washington, D.C. "We need to eliminate these carcinogens from workplaces, homes and schools, and we need to start doing that now. There's ample opportunity for intervention and change, and prevention to protect the health of all Americans."

The American Cancer Society, however, has painted a less grim picture of progress in the last several decades.

"What does not come across is the very large amount that has been learned about the causes of cancer and prevention efforts to address them," said Dr. Michael Thun, vice president emeritus of epidemiology and surveillance research at the American Cancer Society. "Tobacco control is probably the single biggest public health accomplishment of the past 60 years. They are advocates for this particular focus of cancer prevention, but cancer prevention is much broader than this."

Despite advances, cancer is still a major public health problem in the United States and about 41 percent of Americans will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lives, the report stated. Twenty-one percent will die of the disease.

The panel is an advisory group appointed to monitor the development and execution of the National Cancer Program. The group's report addresses a different topic every year.

This year's document stated that while chemicals such as radon, formaldehyde and benzene are ubiquitous in the United States and exposure is commonplace, the public is not aware of the harm these chemicals may be causing to individuals.

Also, the very tools that help doctors detect, diagnose and treat diseases such as cancer -- different forms of medical imaging involving radiation -- may be hurting patients' health. Leffall hopes the report will raise awareness of the issue, while not discounting use of medical imaging when it really is warranted.

"This report makes me think twice about it," he said.

The report also "outed" the military as a leading source of occupational and environmental exposure to carcinogens.

"The military is a major source of toxic occupational and environmental exposure, in particular radiation exposure, for instance, when they have buried things and have contaminated soil and water due to nuclear weapons testing," Leffall said. "This is something the government controls. We think there's something that can be done now."

The report also urged health-care providers to be aware of and ask patients about possible environmental exposures.

The panel urged far-flung members of the community -- government, industry, researchers, health-care workers, advocates and individuals -- to work to reduce environmentally induced cancers.

"Much more research needs to be done about the role of chemicals," Leffall said. "Chemicals have been understudied in many areas and really unregulated. We think that rather than just asking if a food will spoil without this chemical, what are the side effects, what else could we be using? We need pesticides but the whole idea is to just look at those issues."

More information

View the full report at the President's Cancer Panel.



SOURCES: LaSalle D. Leffall Jr., M.D., panel chair, and Charles R. Drew professor of surgery, Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, D.C.; Michael J. Thun, M.D., vice president emeritus, epidemiology and surveillance research, American Cancer Society; Reducing Environmental Cancer Risk: What We Can Do Now


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Hives Treatment Specialist Dr. Tiffany Young Vows to Cure 30,000 Cases of Hives a Month with Hives Rash Website: Hives.org
2. IT Leaderboard Showcases Growing Divide Between Talk and Action on Developing Climate Solutions
3. Agency Pioneer SVH Tours & Travel Launches AppleSpecials.com, New Travel Booking Web Site that Showcases First-Hand Videos and Last Minute Specials
4. Honoring Earth Day 2010; Garden of Eve Skin Care Showcases Green Goddess Offering
5. Officials See Uptick in H1N1 Swine Flu Cases
6. Rapid development of drug-resistant 2009 H1N1 influenza reported in 2 cases
7. Women bear caregiving responsibility in cases of dependency in Spain
8. Hair Alcohol Test Kit to Help in Third of Care Cases
9. Orion Health Showcases Industry Leading EHR Software at WoHIT
10. Red Hot Artist Renea Menzies Has Flower Power; Houston, Texas Artist Renea Menzies Showcases Her Work in NY
11. CareTech Solutions Showcases Web Portal for Hospital Boards and Administrators at HIMSS10
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/5/2016)... York (PRWEB) , ... February 05, 2016 , ... Looking ... answer may be at the tips of your toes. Foot massage, whether administered by ... as pure comfort and relaxation. The American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... , ... US Sports Camps , official operators of Nike Yoga Camps, ... yoga training. ChildLight Yoga Studio is centrally situated in the picturesque New England city ... Studio founder Lisa Flynn expresses her excitement, “We are thrilled to be partnering with ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... Give To Cure today announced that ... donate to Give To Cure’s campaign that is crowdfunding clinical trials to help find ... share payments through a smart device. In 2015 alone, Venmo processed $7.5 billion in ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... 05, 2016 , ... Dr. Justin Scott and Dr. Lydia Muccioli of ... Day to individuals in need. The event is scheduled to take place on February ... is to provide dental care to community members in need. Each patient will be ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... , ... In sleep, when the defenses of the day are at rest, ... with eating disorders is significant self-criticism, and consequently these patients experience this disease with ... maladaptive means for coping with this unease, but also leads to a reservoir of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/5/2016)... , Feb. 5, 2016 ... addition of the "Global Musculoskeletal Partnering ... company profile to their offering. ... addition of the "Global Musculoskeletal Partnering ... company profile to their offering. ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... 5, 2016 Dehaier Medical Systems Ltd. ... "Company"), which develops, markets and sells medical devices ... China and international markets, today announced ... to concentrate the Company,s resources to develop its ... and to focus more on its major businesses. ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... Site Profile: --> ... The Speech Recognition People, announced their latest primary healthcare case study ... reduce turnaround times and to save the practice money. ... 2013 Challenge: --> ,- Wirral CCG ,- ... Six doctors ,- Wirral CCG ,- VoicePower client since 2013 ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: