Navigation Links
U.S. Expands SIDS Prevention Effort

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) is ramping up efforts to reduce the risk of sleep-related sudden infant deaths, the agency announced Wednesday.

The NIH has expanded and revised the "Back to Sleep" campaign launched in 1994 to educate parents and caregivers about ways to prevent sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). It will now be known as the "Safe to Sleep" campaign and include all sleep-related sudden unexpected infant deaths, including those due to SIDS, as well as deaths from other causes.

SIDS is the sudden death of an infant younger than 1 year that cannot be explained, even after a complete investigation, autopsy and review of the infant's health history. The "Back to Sleep" campaign encouraged parents and caregivers to place healthy infants to sleep on their backs, a practice proven to reduce the risk of SIDS.

Infants could also be at risk for other sleep-related causes of death, however, such as accidental suffocation and entrapment by a mattress or bedding material. The NIH has expanded its campaign to ensure infants are provided with a safe sleep environment.

"In recent years, we've learned that many of the risk factors for SIDS are similar to those for other sleep-related causes of infant death," Dr. Alan Guttmacher, director of the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Safe to Sleep sponsor, said in an NIH news release. "Placing infants on their backs to sleep and providing them with a safe sleep environment for every sleep time reduces the risk for SIDS as well as death from other causes, such as suffocation."

In addition to placing infants under 1 year old on their backs for all sleep times, the Safe to Sleep campaign recommends parents and caregivers also take the following steps:

  • Infants should always have their own safe place to sleep. This environment should be free from any soft bedding, blankets or quilts. Infants should also not share a bed with an adult.
  • Infants should be breast-fed whenever possible. Breast-feeding, the NIH explained, is linked to a reduced risk of SIDS.
  • Parents should also ensure infants do not become overheated.
  • Infants should not be exposed to tobacco smoke.
  • Breast-feeding mothers should avoid alcohol or other drugs.

A new "Safe to Sleep" DVD and website are expected to become available in October. Materials will also be available in Spanish. Additional materials will target black and American Indian/Alaska Native communities, which have higher SIDS rates.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about SIDS.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: U.S. National Institutes of Health, news release, Sept. 12, 2012

Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Data release from the Allen Institute for Brain Science expands online atlas offerings
2. Financial Press: Bralorne Gold Mines Strikes Expands on its Ultra-High Grade Gold System in Canada
3. Mahvrick Expands to Brazil, Russia, India, China to Support Existing Client Customer Growth
4. Report says new evidence could tip the balance in aspirin cancer prevention care
5. Decision guide reduced uncertainty over breast cancer prevention, study finds
6. HIV Prevention Pill Cost-Effective for High-Risk Men: Study
7. Report outlines successes, challenges in cancer prevention efforts
8. Animated characters keep it real in teen violence prevention videos
9. Cyberbullying May Call for New Prevention Tactics
10. Supplements and cancer prevention: A cautionary tale
11. Better health in adulthood starts with early prevention in childhood
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
U.S. Expands SIDS Prevention Effort 
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... 30, 2015 , ... Until now, the St. Louis Fetal Care Institute ... of Myelomeningocele Study) trial. One of these exclusion criteria was a BMI above 34.9. ... to 24.9 is considered normal, 25 - 29.9 is overweight and above 30 is ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... Thermi™, a world ... announce that its ThermiRFR temperature controlled radiofrequency platform has received CE marking and ... platform which uses temperature as a clinical endpoint. The technology has been ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... The world of hair transplants and restoration is ... These techniques and procedures have been in use for many years and are among ... Parsa Mohebi, M.D. has utilized many of these methods over the years, he also ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... The presidential race normally ... styling. So why is it a national news story when Donald Trump makes disparaging ... M.D., because appearances count more than anyone wants to admit when it comes to ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... , ... November 30, 2015 , ... According to Los ... people to overeat are not necessarily caused by real hunger, but instead by ... needs food. He notes that, while many patients are aware that weight loss surgery ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/30/2015)... 2015   Royal Philips  (NYSE: PHG ... Radiology Solutions, a fully integrated, consultative approach to ... data-driven practice management approaches that combine imaging systems, ... improve care delivery and reduce costs. Making its ... North America Annual Meeting (RSNA) in ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... -- global cell culture market is expected to ... by 2022 at a CAGR of 7.1% therein. --> ... 2013 value of US$6.1 bn to US$11.3 bn by 2022 at ... has announced the release of a new market research study, detailing ... Culture Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... , Nov. 30, 2015   Royal Philips ... Implant, the industry,s first MRI guided user interface and ... of patients with MR Conditional implants, such as knee ... 2015 Radiological Society of North America Annual Meeting ... and supports diagnostic confidence of this growing patient population. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: