Navigation Links
U.S. Adults Face Substantial Heart Disease Risk: Study
Date:11/5/2012

MONDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDay News) -- American men and women -- even those with a favorable health history -- have a significant risk of developing cardiovascular disease in their lifetime, a new study finds.

Overall, U.S. adults have a more than 55 percent estimated risk of developing cardiovascular disease, the Chicago researchers said.

Even among those with no major risk factors, the chance of developing cardiovascular disease is more than 30 percent, although it appears to strike later, the researchers said.

The study was published online Nov. 5 in the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with its presentation at the American Heart Association's annual meeting in Los Angeles.

"Lifetime risks for total [cardiovascular disease] were high regardless of index age, indicating that achieving older age free of total [cardiovascular disease] does not guarantee escape from remaining lifetime risk for total [cardiovascular disease]," the researchers said in a journal news release.

They added that the finding of a substantial lifetime cardiovascular disease risk even among individuals with an optimal risk factor profile highlights "the large public health burden and opportunities for prevention of total [cardiovascular disease]."

The findings are from an analysis of data collected from 1964 through 2008 in five studies funded by the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. All the participants were initially free of cardiovascular disease.

In this study, the researchers looked at major cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, diabetes and smoking, and calculated the participants' estimated overall lifetime risk (until age 95) for cardiovascular disease at ages 45, 55, 65 and 75.

Here are some of the highlights from the study, conducted by Dr. John Wilkins, of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in Chicago, and colleagues:

  • At all age points, between 2 percent and 8 percent of participants had no major risk factors for cardiovascular disease, while more than 55 percent had at least one or two major risk factors.
  • About one-third of the participants of all ages had a cardiovascular disease event, such as a heart attack, stroke or congestive heart failure, during the study period.
  • At age 45, the estimated overall lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease was more than 60 percent for men and nearly 56 percent for women, the researchers found.
  • Women had a much lower lifetime cardiovascular disease risk at all age points compared to men.
  • At ages 55 and 65, the lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease was more than 50 percent for men and women who had high blood pressure or high total cholesterol but did not have diabetes and did not smoke.
  • At age 55, men with optimal risk factor profiles -- normal blood pressure, normal cholesterol levels, no diabetes and non-smoking -- still had a lifetime cardiovascular disease risk of more than 40 percent, while women with optimal profiles had a nearly 30 percent risk.

Across all ages, people with heart-healthy profiles had a lower lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease than those with at least two major risk factors. For example, at age 45, people with optimal profiles lived up to 14 years longer free of cardiovascular disease than those with at least two major risk factors.

Dr. Stacey Rosen, vice president of Women's Health Clinical Services of North Shore-LIJ Health System in Great Neck, N.Y., said she prefers to view the research in a "glass is half-full" way.

Although the study "does conclude that the life-time risk for heart attack, heart failure and stroke remains high, despite optimal risk factor profiles, the data also demonstrates that those individuals with optimal risk factor profile at age 50 do have significant delay in the presentation of these forms of heart disease," she said.

The results highlight the importance of early identification and appropriate management of all cardiovascular risk factors, she added.

More information

The American Heart Association has more about cardiovascular disease.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCES: Stacey Rosen, M.D., F.A.C.C., F.A.C.P., vice president, Women's Health Clinical Services of North Shore-LIJ Health System, Great Neck, N.Y.; Journal of the American Medical Association, news release, Nov. 5, 2012


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Infection Might Raise Blood Clot Risk for Older Adults: Study
2. EKG Heart Test May Predict Risk in Older Adults
3. Out-of-hand tree nut consumption associated with better diet quality in children and adults
4. Gay Adults Rejected by Parents Have Worse Health, Study Finds
5. Callahan honored for improving older adults health in their doctors offices
6. Anti-tobacco TV ads help adults stop smoking, study finds
7. Researchers determine vitamin D blood level for reducing major medical risks in older adults
8. WSU researches patterns of heavy alcohol use and life commitments in at-risk young adults
9. Many Young Adults at Risk of Skin Cancer: CDC
10. Employment Prospects Dim for Young Adults With Autism
11. Sleepwalking in Adults More Common Than Thought
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
U.S. Adults Face Substantial Heart Disease Risk: Study
(Date:8/23/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... August 23, 2017 , ... Earlier this ... authority on the use of health IT to create efficiencies in healthcare information exchange ... held its 2017 Summer Forum which featured keynote addresses by Donald W. ...
(Date:8/23/2017)... , ... August 23, 2017 , ... Nightingale College continues ... Give Back Day is a time Nightingale College dedicates to serving and volunteering for ... thrive on donations and volunteers or those that need a little extra help. ...
(Date:8/23/2017)... ... August 23, 2017 , ... Boling Vision Center is excited ... and is now seeing patients at Boling Vision Center’s Elkhart & Notre Dame ... and treatment of eye disease, medical retina, high-technology cataract surgery, cosmetic procedures, and ...
(Date:8/23/2017)... ... August 23, 2017 , ... ... Bridge Awards® - for Risk Management Solution Innovations and Security Solution for Government ... platform released in 2017 and its DHS SAFETY Act-designated enterprise security assessment approach. ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... ... 22, 2017 , ... The Women’s Choice Award, a growing platform that gives ... 2017 Women’s Choice Award. The identification by women of an effective new migraine ... sufferers are women. In a survey taken by the Women’s Choice Award organization, nine ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/3/2017)... DIEGO , Aug. 3, 2017  Opioid addiction ... diseases driving up healthcare costs and threatening outcomes, were ... lab supply and IVD industry that support them, met ... care market researcher said that drugs of abuse, procalcitonin ... and sessions at the organization,s 69th meeting in ...
(Date:8/2/2017)... 2017  Life Flight Network and PeaceHealth Oregon Network announced ... care and operational efficiency for patients at hospitals in ... Cottage Grove , and Florence, Oregon ... Life Flight Network work collaboratively to move patients who require ... a time sensitive emergency exists. ...
(Date:7/31/2017)... July 31, 2017  Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc. (NYSE: DPLO), has ... Michigan by Crain,s Detroit Business . ... public companies by three-year revenue growth. This year,s edition measures ... To view the complete list, visit crainsdetroit.com/awards/fast_50/2017 .  ... an incredible triumph," said Phil Hagerman , CEO and ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: