Navigation Links
U-M study challenges notion that umpires call more strikes for pitchers of same race
Date:5/22/2013

ANN ARBORA University of Michigan study challenges previous research that suggests umpire discrimination exists in Major League Baseball.

The study, a collaboration between researchers at U-M and the universities of Illinois and Florida, looks deeper into the controversial argument over whether MLB umpires discriminate by calling more strikes for pitchers of the same race. It found little statistical evidence to support that claim, said Jason Winfree, associate professor of sport management at the U-M School of Kinesiology.

Winfree and co-authors Scott Tainsky of Illinois and Brian Mills of Florida, analyzed millions of pitches between 1997 and 2008 and ran the data through various statistical models. Their results suggest that findings of discrimination were questionable.

A draft of the earlier study that initially found evidence of discrimination was released in 2007 and published by the American Economic Review in 2011. National media reported on both the draft of the study and on its later publication.

In the U-M study, Winfree and his co-authors analyzed both their own data as well as that of the previously published study, but did not get consistent results when using different statistical methods and variables.

"Based on what we found, it's(discrimination) certainly not conclusive, and we could make an argument that there's actually reverse discrimination if you look only at averages," Winfree said. "Our point is (that) with something like this you want to look at the data a lot of different ways and see if you get a consistent result each time with each method. It's a pretty bold claim to say there is racial discrimination."

Winfree and colleagues found that the only specifications that suggested discrimination were when the analysis treated pitchers as completely separate players when pitching in stadiums where umpires were monitored. This seemed to drive much of the findings in the earlier study, they said.

The U-M study and others that look at discrimination in sports are significant not only for sports fans and franchises, but because it's very difficult to test for discrimination in most other occupations, Winfree said. However, because professional sports keep such detailed statistics, discrimination or lack of it is more quantifiable.

"This is a place where it's easy to test for discrimination, and if you find it here, it might be present in other work scenarios where you can't really test it," Winfree said.

The issue of discrimination among referees and umpires has raised debate in other sports as well. For instance, in 2010 the Quarterly Journal of Economics published a study that suggested racial bias among referees in the NBA.

The U-M study, "Further examination of potential discrimination among MLB umpires," appears online in the Journal of Sports Economics.


'/>"/>

Contact: Laura Bailey
baileylm@umich.edu
734-647-1848
University of Michigan
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. More Kids Getting Donor Organs, But Gaps Persist, Study Finds
2. Underactive Thyroid and Heart Failure a Bad Combination: Study
3. Study shows that insomnia may cause dysfunction in emotional brain circuitry
4. Abused Children at Risk for Obesity as Adults: Study
5. A pan-European study: Signs of motor disorders can appear years before disease manifestation
6. Study details genes that control whether tumors adapt or die when faced with p53 activating drugs
7. Overeating learned in infancy, study suggests
8. Study finds new pneumococcal vaccine appears to be as safe as previously used vaccine
9. Antidepressants May Be Helpful for Some Heart Patients: Study
10. Study finds COPD is over-diagnosed among uninsured patients
11. Parker Waichman LLP Comments on New Study Showing that MRI is Useful for Predicting Failure of Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/27/2017)... California (PRWEB) , ... June 27, 2017 , ... A ... has been projected to reach a staggering $6.81 billion by the year 2024 according ... rising at a faster rate than those made from titanium. Los Angeles area clinic ...
(Date:6/27/2017)... ... June 27, 2017 , ... Atmosera ... Atmosera Managed Azure Services . The trusted, transparent, and secure solution for ... company’s growing customer base. Atmosera’s next generation services include integrated capabilities for public, ...
(Date:6/27/2017)... Simi Valley, CA (PRWEB) , ... June 27, 2017 , ... ... deployed since 2001 suffer from PTSD. Yet less than 20% will receive adequate care ... of those with PTSD won't receive any care at all. And left untreated, veterans ...
(Date:6/26/2017)... ... June 26, 2017 , ... Torrance dentist, Dr. Robert Mondavi DDS , ... most noticeable aspects of a person’s appearance. A healthy, radiant smile can make a ... balanced teeth, everyone can have the smile of their dreams with cosmetic dentistry. , ...
(Date:6/26/2017)... , ... June 26, 2017 , ... ... to a recent review of government data released by the United Soybean Board. ... management practices, Maryland’s soybean farmers have increased their productivity on less land per ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/27/2017)... Calif. , Jun 27, 2017   NuEyes ... round of funding to fuel its growth in helping the ... ODG (Osterhout Design Group), the leading developer of augmented, ... NuEyes technology sits. The undisclosed funding amount was ... capital firm, Arab Angel, with offices in Abu ...
(Date:6/16/2017)... -- Datascope Corp. is voluntarily performing a worldwide field correction of certain Intra-Aortic ... code.     ... NUMBER ... 0998-UC-0446HXX; 0998-UC-0479HXX 0998-00-3013-XX;  0998-UC-3013-XX ... This field correction also applies to any System ...
(Date:6/14/2017)... WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. , June 14, 2017  In ... the Creative Startups pitch competition and came ... virtual reality platform is described by Forbes as "entering ... the American Medical Association as teaching "empathy to medical ... success, the startup was recently named a finalist for ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: