Navigation Links
Type 2 Diabetics Studied in Low-Dose Aspirin Trial
Date:11/11/2008

Study highlights:

- In a large primary prevention trial on low-dose aspirin in diabetics, Japanese investigators report that daily aspirin did not have a significant benefit in preventing the primary endpoints of all atherosclerotic events, although it did protect against fatal heart attack and stroke.

- Low-dose aspirin was also associated with a reduced risk of fatal and non-fatal atherosclerotic events, but only in a subgroup of diabetics who were over age 65.

NEW ORLEANS, Nov. 11 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Type 2 diabetics treated with low-dose aspirin did not have a significantly lower incidence of atherosclerotic events than those who received placebo in this primary prevention trial of low-dose aspirin, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2008. However, sub-group analyses showed a significant reduction with aspirin in both atherosclerotic events in those over 65 years of age, and a reduction in cerebrocardiovascular deaths. Results from The Japanese Primary Prevention of Atherosclerosis with Aspirin for Diabetes (JPAD) trial were presented as a late-breaking clinical trial. The study was simultaneously published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

"Our results indicate that aspirin is effective and safe for primary prevention of cardiac and cerebrocardiovascular death in diabetics," said Hisao Ogawa, M.D, Ph.D., lead investigator of the study and a professor of cardiovascular medicine at Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan, and chief of the division of cardiology at the Kumamoto University Hospital. "In addition, it offers a low-cost approach."

The randomized trial included 2,539 type 2 diabetics at 163 Japanese medical centers.

Researchers observed a positive trend for a reduction in all atherosclerotic events in the aspirin group (20 percent relative risk reduction) for the entire population, but it did not reach statistical significance. Atherosclerotic events include coronary heart disease death, fatal stroke, non-fatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, exertional angina, non-fatal stroke including transient ischemic attack, and peripheral arterial disease.

In a subgroup analysis, the researchers found an association between daily low-dose aspirin use and a 32 percent reduced relative risk for all atherosclerotic events, both fatal and non-fatal, but only for diabetics over age 65. In other words, individuals over age 65 who took aspirin had a hazard ratio of 0.68 compared to those who did not take aspirin.

During an average of 4.4 years of follow-up, 154 atherosclerotic events occurred, both fatal and non-fatal (68 in the aspirin group, 86 in the non-aspirin group.) Those events included one fatal cardiovascular event (a hemorrhagic stroke) in the aspirin group and 10 fatal strokes or heart attacks in the non-aspirin group, Ogawa said.

Researchers found a large, statistically significant risk reduction for fatal coronary and cerebrovascular events in the aspirin group vs. the non-aspirin group (hazard ratio of 0.10.) But the confidence interval on that finding was wide (CI=0.01 to 0.8), indicating a need for further study, he said.

Diabetes is considered one of the strongest risk factors for cardiovascular events. Aspirin therapy is commonly used for primary prevention in diabetic patients in the United States and Canada, but not in Japan, Ogawa said.

Several earlier studies have established the benefits of aspirin therapy in preventing second cardiac events. However, its use for primary prevention in diabetics, i.e., prevention in patients without a history of cardiovascular disease, has been controversial because of the lack of data indicating benefits and because aspirin carries a risk of gastric bleeding, Ogawa said.

He said aspirin was well tolerated as demonstrated by the comparable number of the combined endpoint of serious hemorrhagic events (hemorrhagic strokes and major gastrointestinal bleeds).

In comparing bleeding events, the researchers reported 13 hemorrhagic strokes, with no statistically significant difference between aspirin takers and non-takers (six such strokes in the aspirin group; seven in the non-aspirin group).

On the other hand, the total number of all hemorrhagic events was greater in the aspirin group compared to the non-aspirin group (34 vs. 10 such events). Four patients in the aspirin group had bleeding events that required transfusion. Furthermore, those in the aspirin group had more gastrointestinal symptoms (55 cases vs. eight cases), but all cases were resolved without surgery and no fatalities occurred, he said.

"Our findings need to be interpreted in the context of the low incidence of atherosclerotic disease in Japan," Ogawa said. "We conclude that aspirin as primary prevention is beneficial at least for fatal heart attack and fatal stroke in our entire study group and for all atherosclerotic disease among those age 65 or over."

Co-authors are: Masafumi Nakayama, M.D., Ph.D.; Takeshi Morimoto, M.D., Ph.D.; Shiro Uemura, M.D., Ph.D.; Masao Kanauchi, M.D., Ph.D.; Naofumi Doi, M.D., Ph.D.; Seigo Sugiyama, M.D., Ph.D.; and Yoshihiko Saito, M.D., Ph.D. Individual author disclosures are available on the abstract.

The study was funded by Japan's Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare.

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at http://www.americanheart.org/corporatefunding.


'/>"/>
SOURCE American Heart Association
Copyright©2008 PR Newswire.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Drug-Eluting Stents Beat Bare Metal Stents in Diabetics
2. Aspirin Doesnt Guard Diabetics Against Heart Disease
3. Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics Kidney Risks
4. Research shows aerobic exercise combined with resistance training improves glucose control in diabetics
5. Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
6. Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
7. New Vaccine May Help Type 1 Diabetics in Future
8. Newer Blood Pressure Drug Better for Some Heart Patients, Diabetics
9. UT Southwestern scientists discover leptin can also aid type 1 diabetics
10. Doctor Diabetic Supply Helps Diabetics to Receive Their Testing Supplies as Medicares Competitive Bidding Program Starts
11. Weekly Drug Helps Type 2 Diabetics
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/5/2016)... , ... December 05, 2016 , ... ... today that they have teamed up with The American College of Surgeons (ACS) ... ACS’s Committee on Trauma, the “Bleeding Control Basic” course is a pilot program ...
(Date:12/4/2016)... ... December 03, 2016 , ... The Lymphoma Research ... lymphoma research and serving the lymphoma community through a comprehensive series of education ... Tasting Event in New York City, with long-time partners The Paul Foundation, on ...
(Date:12/4/2016)... ... December 03, 2016 , ... Houston ... the 2016 Anti-Aging & Beauty Awards at The Aesthetic & Anti-aging Medicine ... Medicine European Congress (AMEC) brings together the industry’s leading scientific experts, speakers, ...
(Date:12/4/2016)... ... December 04, 2016 , ... ... cosmetic surgery can now take advantage of a cosmetic procedure known as ... treatment that reduces the appearance of age spots, fine lines, uneven coloration, ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 02, 2016 , ... Halfway through its partnership with First 5 ... services to more than 15,900 children 5 years old and younger and treatment services ... over a span of five years to Western University of Health Sciences, UCLA and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/2/2016)... bioLytical Laboratories, un líder mundial en test rápidos de ... Self Test , a los miembros de la Kenya Pharmaceutical Association. ... ... INSTI HIV Self Test! (PRNewsFoto/bioLytical Laboratories) ... (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20161201/444905 ) bioLytical fue invitada por la Clinton ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... 2016 Research and Markets has announced the ... and Demand Forecast to 2022" report to their offering. ... , , ... 2015, and it is expected to grow at a CAGR of 5.5% ... witness faster growth during the forecast period, a CAGR of 8.8% in ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... On Thursday, December 1st 2016, ... research, development and innovation in the biopharmaceutical industry at ... in the presence of Sergey Tsyb, Vice Minister of ... , Natalia Sanina, First Vice Chairman of the ... of Roszdravnadzor, National Service of Control in Healthcare, Sergey ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: