Navigation Links
Tumor-killing virus selectively targets diseased brain cells
Date:2/19/2008

WASHINGTON, DC February 19, 2008 New findings show that a specialized virus with the ability to reproduce its tumor-killing genes can selectively target tumors in the brains of mice and eliminate them. Healthy brain tissue remained virtually untouched, according to a Feb. 20 report in The Journal of Neuroscience. With more research, the technique could one day offer a novel way of treating brain cancer in humans.

Most importantly, this study finds that the virus can penetrate into the brain, where it even reaches cells that have migrated away from the main tumor, says Harald Sontheimer, PhD, of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, who was not affiliated with the study. Assuming that the virus behaves similarly in humans, in the future, it may provide a novel and highly efficacious way to treat resistant tumors.

The study is the culmination of six years of basic research into the fundamental processes of viruses and the cells they target, conducted by senior author Anthony van den Pol, PhD, and his team at Yale University School of Medicine. They set out to test the vesicular stomatis virus, which was selected for its ability to attack brain tumors and leave healthy tissue largely uninfected.

Tumor cells from brain cancers commonly found both in people and in mice were implanted into immune-compromised mice, which then received an injection of the virus in the tail. By viewing fluorescent proteins embedded in both tumor and virus cells in the brains of living mice, van den Pols team watched as the virus infected multiple sites in the brain, spreading across an entire tumor within three days, killing tumor cells in its wake. The virus did not target normal mouse tissue or non-cancerous human brain cells transplanted into the mouse brain, the team found. They speculated that, unlike those in healthy brain tissue, blood vessels within brain tumors may leak, allowing the virus to cross the usually impenetrable protective barrier around the brain.

The virus was equally effective in destroying tissue from cancers that start in the breast or lung and spread to the brainthe two cancers most likely to metastasize to the brainand targeted tumors at different sites throughout the body. Each year in the United States, more than 20,000 new cases of brain or nervous system cancers are diagnosed, according to the National Cancer Institute.

Future research will focus on understanding potential safety risks, such as whether the virus could eventually infect normal brain cells, as well exploring potential changes to the virus that could mitigate such risk. We have some ideas for making the virus safer in the human brain, says van den Pol. This is important to prevent the virus from potentially infecting normal brain cells after it has targeted the brain tumor.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sara Harris
sharris@sfn.org
202-963-4000
Society for Neuroscience
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Virus Could Help Drive Obesity
2. Scientists detect presence of marburg virus in african fruit bats
3. Norwalk virus: Cruise ship illness challenging and costly to hospitals, too
4. Human Papilloma Virus vaccines may decrease chances of oral cancer
5. New viruses to treat bacterial diseases -- My enemies enemy is my friend
6. FDA Approves New Roche West Nile Virus Blood Screening Test
7. Laser blasts viruses in blood
8. Burgeoning Population of Hepatitis C Virus Patients in Need of Second- and Third-Line Treatment Options
9. Novel virus detection identifies new viruses in study of respiratory infections and asthma attacks
10. Customized virus kills brain tumor stem cells that drive lethal cancer
11. Stomach Virus a Culprit in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/5/2016)... ... December 05, 2016 , ... The Avamere Family ... – Avamere Transitional Care of Puget Sound ; located at 630 S ... center will provide patients recovering from illness or injury with intensive skilled nursing ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... December 05, 2016 , ... Researchers at ... on the growing brains of young athletes. Over the course of three years, researchers ... through unique mouth guards. The mouth guards, equipped with special sensors, will track the ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... Fla (PRWEB) , ... December 05, 2016 , ... ... as Keynote speaker for the 21st Annual International Congress on Hematologic Malignancies®: Focus ... announcement, PER® president, Phil Talamo said, “We are honored to have Amy E. ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... ... December 05, 2016 , ... Dr. Barry M. Weintraub, one of New York ... participated in the 36th Annual Cutting Edge Aesthetic Symposium at the Waldorf Astoria in ... that perfect, yet natural-looking, nose. Dr. Weintraub, who is world-renowned for his expertise in ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... and MALVERN, PA (PRWEB) , ... ... ... Supplies Management ("CSM"), a Great Point Partners ("GPP") portfolio company, today announced ... – Clinical Supplies ("TCS"). TCS was previously a subsidiary of Chiltern ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/5/2016)... -- Sanovas, Inc., a life science asset holding ... its wholly owned subsidiary, Intubation Science, Inc., and its LightSpeed ... - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20161202/445251LOGO   ... Sanovas, Inc. ... There are over 40 million Endotracheal Intubations performed ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... 2016  CVS Health, the nation,s largest pharmacy innovation ... score of 100 percent on the Corporate Equality Index ... an annual national benchmarking survey and report on corporate ... the Human Rights Campaign Foundation. "Our ... colleagues, customers and suppliers bring to CVS Health," said ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... PARSIPPANY, N.J. , Dec. 5, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... announced preliminary safety and efficacy data from a ... selective MDM2 inhibitor, suggesting that DS-3032 may be ... acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome ... of the phase 1 study of DS-3032 were presented ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: