Navigation Links
Treatment of Barrett's esophagus may lower risk of esophageal cancer
Date:4/4/2011

New guidelines issued by the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) support the use of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) to remove precancerous cells in patients with Barrett's esophagus, a condition most commonly caused by chronic acid reflux, or GERD. Barrett's esophagus is the leading cause of esophageal cancer and affects an estimated two million Americans. While traditionally managed through watchful waiting, experts at Northwestern Medicine's Center for Esophageal Disease have been among the pioneers of ablation treatment and have long seen the benefits of early treatment.

Frequent heartburn, regurgitation, and trouble swallowing are common symptoms of GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease), which experts believe is the result of stomach contents washing back into the esophagus leading to the development of Barrett's Esophagus. Repeat exposure to stomach acids can result in damage to the esophagus and cause healthy cells to transform into these precancerous cells. Unfortunately, many patients with Barrett's Esophagus can be asymptomatic.

"The incidence of esophageal cancer is increasing more rapidly than any other type of cancer in the United States and survival rates remain low," said Northwestern Medicine gastroenterologist Srinadh Komanduri, MD. "Barrett's esophagus is a precancerous condition, and while the majority of people who suffer from the disorder will never develop cancer, the risk is present. Early treatment with RFA would likely reduce a patient's chance to develop cancer."

RFA burns away layers of abnormal cells and effectively eliminates the disease in 90-100 percent of patients. Doctors use a flexible tube (endoscopy) inserted into the esophagus to reach the treatment area, which also provides access for taking biopsies or endoscopic resection of suspicious lesions.

Northwestern's Center for Esophageal Disease is the top program in Chicago and has treated more than 130 patients with endoscopic therapy.

"We have seen great results using RFA therapy," said Komanduri who is also an assistant professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. "It effectively cures Barrett's esophagus in most patients, leads to fewer surgical procedures for the disease, and contributes to lowering the growth rate of esophageal cancer."

The new AGA guidelines recommend RFA treatment for patients with low to high grade dysplasia due to Barrett's esophagus and suggest it as an effective option for high-risk patients without dysplasia. Speak with your physician to determine if you are a candidate.


'/>"/>

Contact: Angela Salerno
asalerno@nmh.org
312-926-8327
Northwestern Memorial Hospital
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Despite Treatment, Employees with Depression Generate Higher Absentee Costs, According to Thomson Reuters Study
2. Women More Likely to Fail Treatment for Atrial Fibrillation
3. Social Anxiety and Panic - Alternative Treatment to Drugs and Therapy
4. Neuroimaging study may pave way for effective Alzheimers treatments
5. Nanofilm Introduces Clarity Defog It™ Anti Fog Treatment and EcoClens™ Eco-Friendly Lens Cleaner at Vision Expo East
6. Many veterans not getting enough treatment for PTSD
7. Scott & White Memorial Hospital uses device to revolutionize treatment of traumatic aortic injury
8. Allegheny General Hospital Study Demonstrates Safety and Potential Efficacy of Oral Allergy Treatment
9. Charging less for more effective treatments could reduce health care costs while improving health
10. Added Drug Aids MS Treatment
11. PTSD Treatment Still Lacking for Veterans
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... of Bruton Memorial Library on June 21 due to a possible lice infestation, as reported ... head lice: the parasite’s ability to live away from a human host, and to infest ... in the event that lice have simply gotten out of control. , As lice are ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... On Friday, June 10, ... Bronze Wellness at Work award to iHire in recognition of their exemplary accomplishments in ... the 7th annual Maryland Workplace Health & Wellness Symposium at the BWI Marriott in ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Marcy was in a crisis. Her son James, eight, was ... his family verbally and physically. , “When something upset him, he couldn’t control his emotions,” ... He would throw rocks at my other children and say he was going to kill ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... , ... Topical BioMedics, Inc, makers of Topricin and MyPainAway Pain Relief Products, join The ‘Business ... to $12 an hour by 2020 and then adjusting it yearly to increase at the ... minimum wage, assure the wage floor does not erode again, and make future increases more ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... the Frederick area economy by obtaining investment capital for emerging technology companies. ... years that have already resulted in more than a million dollars of capital ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... CAMBRIDGE, Mass. , June 24, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... the Spaulding Rehabilitation Network,s Dean Center for ... of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, MIT Hacking Medicine, ... Center for Innovation, today announced the five finalists ... Hackathon for Lyme disease.  More than 100 scientists, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... -- Dehaier Medical Systems Ltd. (NASDAQ: DHRM ... sells medical devices and wearable sleep respiratory products in ... agreement with Hongyuan Supply Chain Management Co., Ltd. (hereinafter ... 2016, to develop Dehaier,s new Internet medical technology business. ... leverage Hongyuan Supply Chain,s sales platform to reach Dehaier,s ...
(Date:6/24/2016)...   Pulmatrix, Inc ., (NASDAQ: PULM ... announced today that it was added to the Russell ... comprehensive set of U.S. and global equity indexes on ... milestone for Pulmatrix," said Chief Executive Officer Robert ... progress in developing drugs for crucial unmet medical needs, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: