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Traumatic Brain Injury: UCSF Neurosurgeon Calls For More Research, Improved Treatment Standard
Date:3/20/2009

What is needed is a new classification system and an overall standardization of treatment and research efforts, says UCSF professor and internationally recognized neurotrauma expert Geoff Manley, MD, PhD, professor of neurological surgery, co-director of the UCSF Brain and Spinal Injury Center and chief of neurotrauma at UCSF-affiliated San Francisco General Hospital.

(Vocus) March 20, 2009 -- But when the headlines shift to other topics and the current flurry of public interest in TBI subsides, there will remain a pressing need for increased awareness and improved treatment of these potentially life-altering -- but also often treatable -- injuries, says UCSF professor and internationally recognized neurotrauma expert Geoff Manley, MD, PhD, professor of neurological surgery, co-director of the UCSF Brain and Spinal Injury Center and chief of neurotrauma at UCSF-affiliated San Francisco General Hospital.

The majority of TBI victims -- who number about 1.4 million annually -- are treated and released from the emergency department, but TBI remains a major cause of death and disability. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 5.3 million Americans are currently living with long-term or permanent mental and physical impairments as a result of a TBI.

"Studies over the past two decades have revealed much about the biological mechanisms behind TBI, but there has been a serious lag when it comes to translating that knowledge into a successful clinical trial and improved patient care," said Manley.

"There have been more than two dozen failed clinical trials, and no substantial progress in taking the kind of research we do at UCSF and translating it to the clinical arena," Manley said. "Even the way we classify TBI is completely outdated."

The current classification system, known as the Glasgow Coma Scale (GSC), divides a patient's TBI into the extremely broad categories of mild, moderate and severe, and fails to take into account the specifics of each patient's condition, Manley said.

What is needed is a new classification system and an overall standardization of treatment and research efforts, he said.

"If we can start to standardize, we can really change the field," Manley said. "Only by standardizing can we make things more efficient, streamlined and economical."

Manley and other TBI experts from nearly 50 agencies and institutions will be tackling these issues at a consensus conference in Silver Spring, MD, on March 23-24. The conference is co-sponsored by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury, the National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Manley said he hopes the conference will produce real results that can be immediately applied to TBI clinical trials, including one scheduled to take place at UCSF later this year -- the ProTECT trial -- that will study the use of progesterone in the treatment of acute brain injury.

Increasing Awareness
In the long term, he said, overhauling the way TBI is currently studied and treated could prevent tragedies like the one that befell Richardson.

Manley called Richardson's condition "totally treatable" and said if she had received prompt medical attention and surgery, she likely would have survived.

"It's truly a matter of awareness," he said. "Everybody believes cancer or heart disease could happen to them, but nobody really believes they're going to walk across the street and someone is going to run them over. For whatever reason, people don't want to believe they are going to sustain a head injury despite the fact that TBI remains one of the leading causes of death under the age of 45."

Appreciating the potential danger of head injuries and taking the proper precautions "is just not part of the fabric of our culture," Manley said. "That's something that has to change."

Related Links:
UCSF Expert Discusses Traumatic Brain Injury, Natasha Richardson

Manley Laboratory at UCSF

UCSF Research at SFGH Helps Critically Injured Neurotrauma Surgeon Geoff Manley
School of Medicine, May 22, 2007

Pushing the Limits to What Is Medically Possible--Patient Story: Crystal Elmendorf
School of Medicine, May 22, 2007

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Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Natasha_Richardson/brain_injury/prweb2254254.htm.


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