Navigation Links
Transfusing Anemic Cancer Patients Boosts Clot Risk
Date:11/28/2008

But the danger is about the same as using drugs for treatment, study suggests

FRIDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Giving blood transfusions to treat anemia in cancer patients increases the risk of potentially lethal blood clots, say University of Rochester, N.Y., researchers.

But this risk is no greater than other treatments for cancer treatment-related anemia, the scientists said, after having analyzed data on more than 70,500 cancer patients who received transfusions at 60 medical centers from 1995 to 2003.

Of those patients, 7.2 percent developed venous thromboembolism (VTE), and 5.2 percent developed arterial thromboembolism (ATE), compared with rates of 3.8 percent and 3.1 percent, respectively, among patients who didn't receive transfusions.

The study was published in the latest issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

Anemia is a common side effect of chemotherapy. Red blood cell-boosting drugs called erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are used to fight anemia, but these medications increase the risk of blood clots, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration last year issued restrictions on their use. It was hoped that red blood cell transfusions would offer a safe alternative.

While blood transfusion did increase the risk of blood clots, the risk is comparable to that of ESAs.

The researchers said their findings pose a dilemma for doctors who want to prevent blood clots, one of the leading causes of illness and death in cancer patients. Parts of blood clots can break off and travel to other parts of the body, causing a serious problem in the lungs (pulmonary embolism) or a heart attack or stroke.

"We've known that medications used for the treatment of anemia in cancer cause blood clots, and using transfusions was an alternative that some doctors chose to try to avoid this problem, lead author Dr. Alok Khorana said in a university news release "This study shows that transfusions may be no better for patients. We need to be cautious in the use of transfusions and search for ways to reduce our patients' risk of developing blood clots, which are dangerous."

"We need to understand why people who get transfusions are more likely to get blood clots," Dr. Charles Francis, professor of medicine and director of the hemostasis and thrombosis program, said in the news release.

More information

The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has more about blood clots.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: University of Rochester Medical Center, news release, Nov. 24, 2008


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Drug for anemic cancer patients raises risk of death
2. Novel small molecule therapy shows benefit for anemic patients via hydration of red blood cells
3. ASGE encouraged by drop in colorectal cancer deaths
4. CSHL scientists show how a protein that determines cell polarity prevents breast cancer
5. Report Shows Progress in Fight Against Cancer, but Congress, States Must Step Up Efforts to Reduce Smoking, Lung Cancer
6. Radiation before surgery improves pancreatic cancer outcomes
7. Gene Test Could Predict Colon Cancers Return
8. Cancer incidence and mortality drops among American men and women, according to annual report
9. Annual report to the nation finds declines in cancer incidence and death rates
10. LSUHSCs Dr. Xiao Cheng Wu co-authors annual report to the nation on cancer
11. Weight Boosts Older Womens Breast Cancer Risk
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Transfusing Anemic Cancer Patients Boosts Clot Risk
(Date:10/13/2017)... Nevada (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... Hemp CBD Oil utilizing Purzorb™ technology. Applying the Purzorb™process to full spectrum CBD oil ... required and providing a CBD form that can be easily incorporated into liquid products, ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... , ... October 13, 2017 , ... Many families have ... many long-term care insurance companies have a waiver for care if the client has ... period, when the family pays for care, is often waived, so the benefits from ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... Texas (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... Yisrayl ... this week that explains one of the most popular and least understood books in ... like cryptic and puzzling descriptions that have baffled scholars for centuries. Many have tossed ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 2017 , ... “America On The Brink”: the Christian history of the United ... the creation of published author, William Nowers. Captain Nowers and his wife, Millie, ... spent thirty years in the Navy. Following his career as a naval aviator ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... meet the demand of today’s consumer and regulatory authorities worldwide. From Children’s to ... and tested to meet the highest standard. , These products are also: ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... Oct. 11, 2017  BioPharmX Corporation (NYSE MKT: BPMX) ... developed an innovative way to use nonlinear optical imaging ... of new drugs. ... Conference will show how researchers from BioPharmX and the ... School used a suite of imaging techniques in what ...
(Date:10/10/2017)...   West Pharmaceutical Services, Inc. (NYSE: WST), ... administration, today shared the results of a study highlighting ... intradermal administration of polio vaccines. The study results were ... 2017 by Dr. Ondrej Mach , Clinical Trials ... (WHO), and recently published in the journal Vaccine. ...
(Date:10/4/2017)... , Oct. 4, 2017 OBP ... self-contained, illuminating medical devices, today announced regulatory approval ... Surveillance Agency (or Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária ... single-use, cordless surgical retractor with integrated LED light ... access, illumination and exposure of a tissue pocket ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: