Navigation Links
Tragic choices: Is it better for doctors or patient families to decide?
Date:4/20/2009

In the medical realm, people sometimes need to make very difficult choices, such as deciding to end life-support for a terminally ill patient. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research delves into the question of whether it is preferable for patients' families or doctors to make those "tragic choices."

Authors Simona Botti (London Business School), Kristina Orfali, and Sheena S. Iyengar (both Columbia University) say that from the time of Hippocrates until the 1980s the "paternalistic model" dominated the field of bioethics. According to this model, doctors made decisions in their patients' best interest. A newer "autonomous model" assumes that patients should be informed of the pros and cons of various medical treatments and make decisions for themselves or family members. When it comes to tragic choices, how do these two models play out?

The researchers conducted in-depth analysis of nineteen interviews with American and French parents who had infants in Neonatal Intensive Care Units. "The experiences of these parents were similar because they were all confronted by the choice of whether to continue or interrupt their babies' life-support therapy, the decision to interrupt the treatment was made, and the baby died. Crucially, however, the decision model in neonatology varies across the two countries: In the U.S., the autonomous model is used, so the decision to interrupt life-support therapy was made by the parents themselves; on the contrary, in France, the paternalistic model still dominates, so the same decision was made by the physicians on behalf of the parents."

In that study and subsequent laboratory experiments, the researchers found that people who made the choices were more confident that the best decisions were made. But in spite of this higher confidence, they expressed more negative emotion that those who did not choose. "In addition, both choosers and non-choosers were ambivalent towards decision autonomy," the authors write. "On the one hand, they did not like deciding by themselves, but on the other they also did not like having the physicians choose for them."

The authors did find, in a final study, that when physicians framed the withdrawal decision as "the only thing to do," people making tragic choices were able to distance themselves from the choice and experience improved emotions.


'/>"/>

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. WuXi PharmaTech (NYSE: WX) Mourns the Tragic Loss of Its Independent Director Shawn Wang
2. Putting the Medical Profession on Notice!: Widow Tells Tragic Story of How Her Husband Died Due to Misdiagnosis and Mistreatment
3. November: National Epilepsy Awareness Month Actress Hunter Tylo Turns Tragic Loss Into Hope
4. Dr. Payman Simoni Comments on the Alleged Tragic Complications Stemming From Ushers Wifes Plastic Surgery
5. Conventional prognostic factors fail to explain better prostate cancer survival in most Asian men
6. Waist-to-hip ratio may better predict cardiovascular risk than body mass index
7. Informational handout key to giving parents a better understanding of CT radiation risks
8. Children of depressed moms do better when dad is involved, SLU researcher finds
9. Struggling male readers respond better to female teachers
10. Physician Skin Care Specialist Says Proposed New Rules for Sunscreen Products Will Better Protect the Public
11. Mothers Know Best: NFL Moms Team With Eddie George to Showcase a Better Way to a Healthier Lifestyle
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 2017 , ... As health professionals work to improve their approach to healthcare, ... doing more than filling out a survey; in many cases health professionals and patients ... health care and research on the importance of active engagement with patients and members ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... Ky. (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... The ... MPH to become its next President and Chief Executive Officer, succeeding Dr. James C. ... CEO Elect beginning July 1, 2018 until Dr. Puffer’s retirement at the end of ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... PurhealthRX , a leading Health and Nutrition ... the Purzorb™process to full spectrum CBD oil will revolutionize the rapidly growing CBD market ... can be easily incorporated into liquid products, while reducing costs to end users. , ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Lori R. Somekh, founder of the ... national organization of elder law and special needs planning attorneys. “Membership in ElderCounsel helps ... provides a forum to network with elder law attorneys nationwide,” said Somekh. , ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... with Alzheimer’s or dementia. However, many long-term care insurance companies have a waiver for ... mean is the 90-day elimination period, when the family pays for care, is often ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/4/2017)... South Korea , Oct. 4, 2017  South ... its next-generation CPR training aide "cprCUBE" on Kickstarter. The ... chest compression during cardiac arrests with better efficiency compared ... It also offers real-time feedback on efficacy of the ... The crowdfunding campaign has a goal to raise $5,000. ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc. (NYSE: DPLO ... LLC , and named its founder as Diplomat,s chief ... Tennessee , will operate under Diplomat subsidiary ... offerings for health care partners to include IT outsourcing, ... "In an interoperable world, technology delivers comprehensive insight ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... Halo Labs announces the European launch of their new low volume, ... 2017 in Cambridge, U.K on October 4th. ... samples with unprecedented speed and sensitivity while using far less sample ... ... system ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: