Navigation Links
Too Much or Too Little Activity Can Spur Knee Problems

MONDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDay News) -- For middle-aged adults trying to protect their knee health, it may be best to avoid extreme ends of the exercise spectrum, such as too much high-impact exercise or too little physical activity, researchers have found.

While playing tennis and running can speed up the deterioration of knee cartilage, so can just sitting on the couch, investigators from the University of California, San Francisco, pointed out.

Using MRI scans, the researchers monitored changes in the right knee cartilage of 205 patients over the course of four years. Cartilage at the patella, femur and tibia of the right knee joint were examined when the study began, at a two-year visit and again after four years.

The participants, who ranged in age from 45 to 60 years, also kept track of their physical activity in a questionnaire. Some of the participants involved in the study also wore an accelerometer, a device used to record physical activity.

The study was scheduled for presentation Monday at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, in Chicago.

"In this study, we used the subjective measure of a questionnaire," Dr. Thomas Link, a professor of radiology and chief of musculoskeletal imaging at UCSF, said in a society news release. "The accelerometers provide a more objective way to measure physical activity."

The study found high-impact physical activity is associated with greater cartilage deterioration and increased risk for osteoarthritis. The participants who were the most active had an accelerated "T2 relaxation time." But the same was true for those with very low levels of activity, the investigators found.

The study authors concluded that there may be an ideal amount of physical activity that people should get that will protect their knee cartilage, and cartilage measurements could allow doctors to detect changes at an earlier stage when they could still be reversed.

"Lower-impact sports, such as walking or swimming, are likely more beneficial than higher-impact sports, such as running or tennis, in individuals at risk for osteoarthritis," Link pointed out in the news release.

About half of people in the United States could develop knee osteoarthritis by the time they are 85 years old, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They estimate that about 67 million American adults will have physician-diagnosed arthritis by 2030.

The data and conclusions of research presented at medical meetings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

While the study found an association between activity levels and knee problems, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

More information

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has more about knee arthritis.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: Radiological Society of North America, news release, Nov. 26, 2012

Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Little evidence of health benefits from organic foods, Stanford study finds
2. Little Evidence on Value of Treatments for Autism: Report
3. Little evidence supports autism treatment options in adolescents
4. Milk Thistle of Little Help Against Hepatitis C: Study
5. Kids Born Even a Little Early Have Lower School Scores: Study
6. New federal disclosure law may have little impact on drugs prescribed
7. Too much vitamin D can be as unhealthy as too little
8. OSHAs Safety Tests Protect Workers at Little Cost: Study
9. A Little More Education, a Little Longer Life?
10. Botox Offers Little Relief for Migraine, Study Finds
11. U.S. Spends Too Little on Public Health Initiatives: Report
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Too Much or Too Little Activity Can Spur Knee Problems
(Date:6/27/2016)... Lafayette, California (PRWEB) , ... ... ... a pioneer in the patient payment industry today announced its strategic partnership ... and health system workflows. , The two companies’ proven, proprietary technology combine ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... Park, KS (PRWEB) , ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... in retailers of Eyeglasses . , Millions of individuals in the United States ... eyeglasses have become a way to both correct vision and make a fashion statement. ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 26, 2016 , ... On June 10-11, 2016, A Forever ... Cereal Festival and World’s Longest Breakfast Table in Battle Creek, MI, where the rehabilitation ... as home to some of the world’s leading providers of cereal and other breakfast ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... North Carolina (PRWEB) , ... June 26, 2016 , ... ... release of a new product that was developed to enhance the health of felines. ... for centuries. , The two main herbs in the PawPaws Cat Kidney Support ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 26, 2016 , ... Many women are confused ... endometriosis. These women need a treatment plan to not only alleviate symptoms and ... help for preservation of fertility and ultimately achieving a pregnancy. The specialists at ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... Tenn. , June 24, 2016  Arkis ... providing less invasive and more durable cerebrospinal fluid ... in funding.  The Series-A funding is led by ... Lighthouse Fund, and other private investors.  Arkis, new ... neurosurgical instrumentation and the market release of its ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... -- Research and Markets has announced the addition ... 2022" report to their offering. ... with kidney failure, it replaces the function of kidneys by ... and thus the treatment helps to keep the patient body,s ... Increasing number of ESRD patients & substantial healthcare ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 Research ... "Pharmaceutical Excipients Market by Type (Organic Chemical (Sugar, Petrochemical, ... (Oral, Topical, Coating, Parenteral) - Global Forecast to 2021" ... The global pharmaceutical excipients market is ... a CAGR of 6.1% in the forecast period 2016 ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: