Navigation Links
This old healthy house
Date:7/28/2008

SALT LAKE CITY The age of your neighborhood may influence your risk of obesity, according to a new study from the University of Utah.

The study, to be published in the September issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, linked the body mass index (BMI) of nearly a half million Salt Lake County residents to 2000 Census data. The study found that residents were at less risk of being obese or overweight if they lived in walkable neighborhoodsthose that are more densely populated, designed to be more friendly to pedestrians and have a range of destinations for pedestrians.

The study found that neighborhoods built before 1950 tended to offer greater overall walkability as they more often were designed with the pedestrian in mind, while newer neighborhoods often were designed to facilitate car travel.

Demographer Ken Smith, co-author of the study and professor of family and consumer studies at the University of Utah, says that although individuals clearly make personal decisions that influence their weight, neighborhood characteristics also play a potentially important role in affecting residents' risk of obesity.

"It is difficult for individuals to change their behavior," he says, "but we can build environments that promote healthy behavior."

Using height and weight data collected by the Driver License Division of the Utah Department of Public Safety, Smith and colleagues calculated the BMI of 453,927 Salt Lake County residents age 25 to 64, linking it to census-block groups via geographical coordinates. To protect confidentiality, all personal information from the Driver License Division was removed before the data were provided to the researchers. The study was approved by the University of Utah Institutional Review Board.

The study found that a man of average height and weight (6 feet, 200 pounds) weighed 10 pounds less if he lived in a walkable neighborhood versus a less walkable neighborhood. A woman of average size (about 5-foot-5, 149 pounds), weighed six pounds less.

"The data show that how and where we live can greatly affect our health," says Smith.

According to the study, during 2003-2004 roughly 70 percent of men and 61 percent of women in the U.S. were overweight. The study also notes that by 2030, about half the buildings in the U.S. will have been built since 2000. How this growth occurs will have a significant impact on the environment and on the health of the people living in it, Smith says.

"We have the opportunity, using evidence-based data on community design, to create neighborhoods that encourage less car driving, benefiting residents' health and wallets and shrinking our own carbon footprint," says Smith.

Neighborhoods with higher percentages of pedestrian trafficsomething the study found is associated with less obesity among residentscan serve as models for future residential development and redevelopment. "Neighborhoods with higher fractions of residents that walk to work tell us that something beneficial about the neighborhood is promoting health," notes Smith.

"We expect these results mean that residents find walking more attractive and enjoyable where there are other walkers, a variety of destinations easily accessible by foot and pedestrian-friendly street networks. People want to walk when it's pleasant, convenient and when there is a destination."


'/>"/>

Contact: Taunya Dressler
t.dressler@ucomm.utah.edu
801-587-9183
University of Utah
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Penn study finds pro-death proteins required to regulate healthy immune function
2. UCLA researchers identify markers that may predict diabetes in still-healthy people
3. Air pollution linked to cardiovascular risk indices in healthy young adults
4. Top Tips to Enjoy Healthy Latin Food Without Losing the Taste (Recipe)
5. Finicky Felines Award Four Stars to New Wellness(R) Healthy Indulgence Everyday Entrees
6. Keeping Kids Healthy and Fit: The New York Kids Club Launches a Revolutionary New Fitness Program
7. LifeMasters Provides Tips for Maintaining a Healthy Blood Cholesterol Level
8. On September 7th Local Organizations Partner to Celebrate Healthy Steps
9. September is Healthy Aging Month
10. Children who learn heart healthy eating habits lower heart disease risk
11. FDA: Use the Nutrition Facts Label to Make Healthy Food Choices
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... April 25, 2017 , ... Back Pain Centers ... back pain with a reputable physician in their area, announces the launch of a ... information for patients who are looking for reputable physicians to help them with back ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... , ... There is no better place in South Florida to undergo two ... May issue of Consumer Reports focused on heart health. , The magazine gave ... after coronary bypass and aortic valve replacement procedures. , Consumer Reports rated ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... Nashville, TN (PRWEB) , ... April 24, 2017 , ... ... electrifying fans and transforming the quarterback position. The former overall number one pick in ... his professional football career. He holds the record for the most career rushing yards ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... , ... April 24, 2017 , ... The bar for ... those unreal icons inhabiting the rarified air of pop and film stardom.(1) Not to ... anyone snapping pictures: the smile. Grins now run the gamut from being encrusted with ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... ... The John P. McGovern Museum of Health and Medical Science is now partnered with ... share results with their physicians. Members and guests can sign up for its free ... Dr. David Eagleman, formerly at Baylor College of Medicine and now at Stanford University, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/19/2017)... , April 19, 2017 ... an immune response in pets such as canine, ... are of various types such as Attenuated Live ... Vaccines, DNA Vaccines and Recombinant Vaccines. Attenuated live ... virus or bacteria, which have been weakend under ...
(Date:4/18/2017)...  Cardinal Health (NYSE: CAH ) today ... per share (EPS) guidance and providing a preliminary view ... with this morning,s announcement of the planned acquisition of ... businesses. Cardinal Health now believes that fiscal ... the bottom of its previous guidance range of $5.35 ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... 18, 2017  Astute Medical, Inc., developer of biomarkers ... be presented at the 2017 National Kidney Foundation (NKF) ... continues through April 22. Physicians will present data on ... assess risk for acute kidney injury (AKI) during the ... Elevated levels of TIMP-2 and IGFBP-7 ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: