Navigation Links
Their immune cells, fighting your cancer

IMMUNE cells from cancer-resistant people are to be injected into those with cancer to help fight the disease. Zheng Cui at Wake Forest University of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and his colleagues have received permission from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to screen people for their ability to ward off cancer. Immune cells from the best cancer fighters will be given to cancer patients, after being matched for blood type. All of us have some ability to fight cancer, via immune cells called NK cells which can identify and kill tumour cells, although the extent of these cells influence is not known. But Cui has now discovered that a much larger population of immune cells called granulocytes can also kill cancer and that the effectiveness of these cells varies from person to person.

Cui took blood samples from more than 100 people and mixed their granulocytes with cervical cancer cells. While granulocytes from one individual killed around 97 per cent of cancer cells within 24 hours, those from another healthy individual only killed around 2 per cent of cancer cells. Average cancer-killing ability appeared to be lower in adults over the age of 50 and even lower in people with cancer. It also fell when people were stressed, and at certain times of the year. Nobody seems to have any cancer-killing ability during the winter months from November to April, says Cui, who presented preliminary results at the Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence meeting in Cambridge, UK, earlier this month.

Initial evidence suggests it may be possible to transfer the ability to fight off cancer between people. Granulocytes are already taken from donors and given to some patients whose immune systems have been depleted by chemotherapy, for example, though not to treat cancer directly. And last year Cui successfully treated a range of different cancers in mice by injecting them with granulocytes from a strain of mice that are completely resistant to cancer (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0602382103).

Cui hopes to begin human trials next summer in the US, when the immune systems of potential granulocyte donors will be at their peak.

The concept of using immune cells from one person to fight cancer in another person is a very hot topic right now, says John Gribben, a cancer immunologist at Cancer Research UKs experimental medicine centre at St Bartholomews Hospital, London.

However, if Cui plans to try this therapy in people, he will have to be very careful, Gribben says. If theyre using live cells there is a theoretical risk of graft-versus-host disease, which can prove fatal. This is a particular problem in patients with depleted immune systems, where transfused cells may proliferate and take over the hosts immune system, eventually destroying cells in the bone marrow. Cui says he is working with the FDA to minimise this risk.


Contact: Claire Bowles
New Scientist

Related medicine news :

1. Starvation in pregnant women can cause heart disease to their children
2. Antibiotics losing their power against acne
3. False beliefs could cost cancer patients their lives
4. People suffering from Alzheimer’s: can they take decisions about their treatment
5. Worms Learn To Choose Their Diet
6. Diabetics and their babies
7. Pregnant smokers could harm their child
8. Healthcare Professionals Might Want To Rethink Their Dress Code
9. Diabetics Can Now Be Able To Control Both Blood Sugar And Their Weight
10. Mother’s Diet Could Prevent Cancer In Their Unborn Children
11. Common Thyroid Problems In Women May Lower Their Risk Of Developing Breast Cancer
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/24/2015)... , ... November 24, 2015 , ... ... the organization will waive paid entry and parking fees at several of their ... Monument Mountain in Great Barrington in support of REI’s Black Friday #OptOutside Campaign. ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... Cancer patients, survivors, caregivers, ... at a live taping of the next CURE Connections® video series ... Cancers 2015 Symposium at Georgetown University Hotel & Conference Center in Washington, D.C. ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... 2015 , ... With Thanksgiving right around the corner, holiday travel season is ... your family and vehicle. , According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 301 ... sharing the following safety tips from the NHTSA: , ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... ... Cleveland University-Kansas City (CU-KC), in Overland Park, Kansas. Benson, a fifth-trimester ... University President Carl S. Cleveland III on October 16. , “Katie is very ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... 24, 2015 , ... Bibliomotion is thrilled to announce the launch ... and Diversity by Nancy M. Schlichting, Chief Executive Officer of Henry Ford ... address the needs of patients and their families, shaped my desire to improve the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/24/2015)... Avery Biomedical Devices (ABD), manufacturer of the ... appointment of Anders Jonzon , MD; Ph.D. as ... Dr. Jonzon is a Physiologist and consultant ... University, Uppsala and Children,s Hospital, Karolinska, Stockholm, ... at the Cardiovascular Institute (UCSF). His research has covered ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... BERN, Switzerland , November 24, 2015 ... Engineering Research of the University of Bern ... and Clinical Nutrition of the Bern University Hospital "Inselspital" ... collaboration to develop a novel generation artificial pancreas. Combining ... of insulin for diabetic patients with the unequalled accuracy ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... 24, 2015 Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc. (NYSE: DPLO) announced ... Clinical Services, Education and Human Resources will be presenting in ... Drugs: Health Plan Strategies for a Dynamic Market" on Dec. ... , a consultant with the Cambridge Advisory Group, where she ... The webinar will discuss the rapid growth of ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: