Navigation Links
The power of the Internet: It helps improve teens' acne

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. Oct. 31, 2011 -- Tech-savvy teens with acne used their medicine more frequently when they also took part in a web-based survey, a new study from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center finds.

Investigators at Wake Forest Baptist decided to test whether a weekly Internet-based communication could improve teenagers' use of topical acne therapy. And it did.

"Dermatologists have a number of effective topical agents for acne treatment, but patients often do not use their medications as prescribed," said Steve Feldman, M.D., Ph.D, lead author of the study. "Medication use by teens tends to increase around the time of office visits, but this isn't helpful."

The study is published in the October issue of Archives of Dermatology. For this investigator-blinded, randomized, prospective study, Feldman and colleagues enlisted 20 male and female participants, aged 13 to 18 years, with mild to moderate acne. The teens were prescribed topical benzoyl peroxide, 5 percent gel, daily for 12 weeks. They were randomized 1:1 to a control group or to an Internet-based survey group. Those in the Internet survey group were sent a weekly e-mail containing a link to a survey assessing their acne severity and treatment. They answered a total of six questions that addressed how they used the medication.

If participants in the Internet survey group completed at least five surveys during a 6-week period, they received a $5 gift card for In addition, each completed survey provided them an additional chance to win an iPod Nano at the study conclusion.

Medication use was monitored objectively with electronic monitors that recorded the date and time when the medication containers were opened. Adherence was rated as a percentage of days the medication container was opened. The mean adherence rate was 89 percent for the Internet survey group and 33 percent for the control group. Their acne severity was also evaluated with a rating scale as well as by inflammatory and noninflammatory lesion counts at the beginning of the study, at week six, and week 12.

"Adolescents are savvy users of the Internet and other newer technologies, and we found they responded well to the online survey," Feldman said. "We believe the weekly survey may have served as a 'virtual office visit.' Increasing our understanding of what is needed to get teens to use the medication as prescribed will provide better treatment outcomes for patients."


Contact: Bonnie Davis
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Related medicine news :

1. American Council on Exercise (ACE) Study Reveals Kettlebells Provide Powerful Workout in Short Amount of Time
2. Adapting to clogged airways makes common pathogen resist powerful drugs
3. Jennifer Garner Tops Power Plate(R) Power Moms of 2009 List
4. ANT+ and Texas Instruments connect proven ultra low power sensors to smartphones
5. Plumbs Pedal Power Raises Over 6000 for Charity
6. GUMC researchers say flower power may reduce resistance to breast cancer drug tamoxifen
7. Fitness Boosts Brain Power in Multiple Sclerosis Patients
8. Sonitor Technologies Announces New Staff Tag and Battery Powered Ultrasound Receiver
9. National Hispanic Council on Aging Joins the Administration in Mission to Combat Medicare Fraud By Empowering Hispanics
10. Project Runways Tim Gunn Returns to Address Psoriasis(TM) and Empower Patients to be Confident in Their Personal Style
11. Igniting the Power of Community: The Role of CBOs and NGOs in Global Public Health
Post Your Comments:
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... ... The Multiple System Atrophy Coalition has announced the launch of its MSA Can’t ... today to coincide with Giving Tuesday 2015, a global day of fundraising. , ... be productive, to do simple daily activities like walking to the mailbox and eating ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... December 01, 2015 , ... Royal River Natural Foods — a locally-owned, ... post-menopausal women who took the nutritional supplement creatine, along with resistance training for a ... not take creatine. , The report is part of the December 2015 issue of ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Baptist Medical Center Jacksonville has implanted the ... hospital in the region providing what is known as the world’s smallest pacemaker. ... revealed recently at a medical conference and published in The New England Journal ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... December 01, 2015 , ... ... to continue the expansion of the company’s growing product line of food safety ... (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka) – allow InstantLabs to offer fast, reliable ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... December 01, 2015 , ... ... the United States. Podiatrists are well aware that psychology-based patient non-compliance (disobedience of ... often catastrophic contributors to diseases of the diabetic foot. The American Board ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/1/2015)... 1, 2015  Eyeon Therapeutics has received a ... treatments based on a charged hydrophilic polymer developed ... The product has been shown to be safe ... Mark Mitchnick , MD, CEO states, "This ... additional polymers in conjunction with a therapeutic agent.  ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... 1, 2015  Athletic apparel company Tommie ... to pay $1.35 million to settle Federal Trade ... copper-infused compression clothing would relieve severe and chronic ... diseases. Tommie Copper,s proposed ... and its founder and chairman Thomas Kallish ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... diciembre de 2015  AccuTEC Blades, una ... precisión, develó hoy un nuevo logo corporativo ... El nuevo logo destaca la experiencia de ... de productos con cuchillas donde "el borde ... --> ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: