Navigation Links
The diabetes 'breathalyzer'
Date:6/10/2013

PITTSBURGHDiabetes patients often receive their diagnosis after a series of glucose-related blood tests in hospital settings, and then have to monitor their condition daily through expensive, invasive methods. But what if diabetes could be diagnosed and monitored through cheaper, noninvasive methods?

Chemists at the University of Pittsburgh have demonstrated a sensor technology that could significantly simplify the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes through breath analysis alone. Their findings were published in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS).

Even before blood tests are administered, those with diabetes often recognize the condition's symptoms through their breath acetonea characteristic "fruity" odor that increases significantly during periods of glucose deficiency. The Pitt team was interested in this biomarker as a possible diagnostic tool.

"Once patients are diagnosed with diabetes, they have to monitor their condition for the rest of their lives," said Alexander Star, principal investigator of the project and Pitt associate professor of chemistry. "Current monitoring devices are mostly based on blood glucose analysis, so the development of alternative devices that are noninvasive, inexpensive, and provide easy-to-use breath analysis could completely change the paradigm of self-monitoring diabetes."

Together with his colleaguesDan Sorescu, a research physicist at the National Energy Technology Laboratory, and Mengning Ding, a Pitt graduate student studying chemistryStar used what's called a "sol-gel approach," a method for using small molecules (often on a nanoscale level) to produce solid materials. The team combined titanium dioxidean inorganic compound widely used in body-care products such as makeupwith carbon nanotubes, which acted as "skewers" to hold the particles together. These nanotubes were used because they are stronger than steel and smaller than any element of silicon-based electronics.

This method, which the researchers playfully call "titanium dioxide on a stick," effectively combined the electrical properties of the tubes with the light-illuminating powers of the titanium dioxide. They then created the sensor device by using these materials as an electrical semiconductor, measuring its electrical resistance (the sensor's signal).

The researchers found the sensor could be activated with light to produce an electrical charge. This prompted them to "cook" the "skewers" in the sensor under ultraviolet light to measure acetone vaporswhich they found were lower than previously reported sensitivities.

"Our measurements have excellent detection capabilities," said Star. "If such a sensor could be developed and commercialized, it could transform the way patients with diabetes monitor their glucose levels."

The team is currently working on a prototype of the sensor, with plans to test it on human breath samples soon.


'/>"/>

Contact: B. Rose Huber
rhuber@pitt.edu
412-624-4356
University of Pittsburgh
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. How a cancer drug leads to diabetes
2. Heart failure patients with diabetes may benefit from higher glucose levels
3. Disrupted Sleep May Raise Risk for Obesity, Diabetes: Study
4. Mouse Study Hints at New Path for Diabetes Treatment
5. Common Plastics Chemical Might Boost Diabetes Risk
6. Weight-Loss Surgery Beat Drugs for Cutting Diabetes in Very Obese
7. Naturopathic care can improve blood sugar, mood in diabetes
8. Cellular pathway linked to diabetes, heart disease
9. Diabetes Groups Issue New Guidelines on Blood Sugar
10. Value of Metformin, Insulin Combo for Type 2 Diabetes Questioned
11. Xenotransplantation as a therapy for type 1 diabetes
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:7/21/2017)... ... July 21, 2017 , ... ... students improve their chances of acceptance to a residency in a United States ... earned degrees outside the U.S. , According to data released by the ECFMG®, ...
(Date:7/21/2017)... ... July 21, 2017 , ... West Dermatology is pleased ... Vu, PA-C. Beginning July 17, 2017, Ms. Vu will join West Dermatology’s large network ... experience in dermatology, skin cancer , and more. She graduated from the University ...
(Date:7/21/2017)... ... July 21, 2017 , ... How physicians and ... the rise, say researchers presenting their work at the American Orthopaedic Society ... combination of evaluating the patterns of change in concussion symptom presentation, diagnostic tools ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... ... July 20, 2017 , ... Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is ... rapidly without treatment. Newly diagnosed patients face intense chemotherapy regimens and a stem ... With such a challenging diagnosis that requires immediate action, patients and caregivers ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... ... ... For individuals with extended hospital stays or who are residents of nursing ... specially designed to accommodate patients with a wide range of ailments or special needs, ... has invented the patent-pending PORTABLE ARM REST, a specially designed armrest that features many ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:7/12/2017)... and Company (NYSE: LLY ) has entered into ... litigation in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District ... (tadalafil) unit dose patent. This patent was previously set ... agreement, Cialis exclusivity is now expected to end at the ... patent for Cialis is valid and infringed by companies seeking ...
(Date:7/11/2017)... 11, 2017  The global market for liquid biopsy ... $394.1 million in 2016.  Although in early stages, the ... in particular as a result of the gradual shift ... recent introduction of a significant number of new liquid ... of tumor biomarkers to guide treatment decisions. ...
(Date:7/11/2017)... July 11, 2017 Oramed Pharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: ... pharmaceutical company focused on the development of oral drug ... Drug Administration (FDA) has agreed to schedule an End-of-Phase ... IIb trial of its oral insulin capsule ORMD-0801 in ... trial met primary and secondary endpoints by indicating a ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: