Navigation Links
The NHS and the cost-benefit dilemma
Date:1/25/2010

New research by health economists at the University of York has raised concerns over any move to broaden the range of costs and economic benefits considered in the analysis of new NHS treatments.

A study by the University's Centre for Health Economics suggests that widening the perspective used by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) to assess the cost-effectiveness of new technologies may not benefit either the NHS or the wider economy.

The research examined a range of possible policies and a number of case studies from past NICE appraisals.

The new study suggested that taking into account effects outside the NHS would require trade-offs to be made between the overall impact on the health of NHS patients, other social concerns and wider costs and economic benefits

Extending the NICE perspective for drug assessment beyond the NHS raises questions of how to measure and value a range of wider economic effects, requiring controversial judgments about social values.

The research found that maintaining an NHS perspective would, in many circumstances, reflect overall economic effects because technologies which are regarded as cost-effective and offer overall health improvement for patients would also be expected to result in overall net economic benefits.

In addition, extending the perspective for all technologies appraised by NICE would impose additional costs on NICE's appraisal process and introduce the possibility of a biased assessment if the economic benefits associated with other NHS care which may be displaced are more difficult to identify.

Consideration could be restricted to exceptional cases where the external economic benefits are likely to be substantially greater or less than current NHS activities which may be displaced.

This more focused approach would require greater clarity on how wider effects will be considered by NICE, as well as criteria to identify exceptional cases, possibly based on the nature of the technology, the type of disease and the patient population. But the researchers warn that repeated application of this policy will ultimately lead to significant impacts on the NHS and a positive bias in favour of new technologies.

Lead researchers Professor Karl Claxton and Professor Mark Sculpher conclude: "Adopting a wider perspective without taking proper account of the implications of an NHS budget, which is fixed by government and beyond the remit of a body like NICE, has little to commend it. "

The independent study, which was commissioned through the Department of Health's Policy Research Programme, will be discussed at a workshop this Spring.


'/>"/>

Contact: David Garner
dcg501@york.ac.uk
44-019-044-32153
University of York
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Study quantifies cost-benefit of hospital-based program to keep youth out of prison
2. IQWiG presents a concept for cost-benefit assessment methods in the German health care system
3. Homeowners Admit to Dust Bunny Dilemma
4. Diabetes dilemma: older people with diabetes face a heavy burden from co-existing health conditions
5. The forever war on terror: Dilemmas and choices
6. Florida Dentist Launches Revolutionary Solution to National Dental Specialist/Patient Care Dilemma
7. Medical Marketing Expert Offers Dentists Tips for Thriving Down Economy After the Wall Street Dilemma
8. Lights Out For Bed Bugs as "BEST YET" Cedar Oil Solution Solves International Bed Bug Dilemma
9. PALNET Solves the Pallet Buyers Dilemma
10. Do the Swiss Have the Answer to Americas Health Care Dilemma?
11. Study examines ethical dilemmas of medical tourism
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... ... For many women, getting birth control isn’t as easy as it should be. In fact, ... to a health care facility or a pharmacy within 60 minutes of where they live. ... for many who are faced with health or personal issues that leave them homebound. To ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... March 28, 2017 , ... ... to be invited to the Siemens Healthineers annual customer education symposium, a world-class ... will take place from March 27 - 31, 2017 at the Atlanta Marriott ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... ... Isabella Wentz, PharmD, FASCP, one of the leading thyroid experts of the world, is ... about journey and research recently on a blog and discussed some major aspects of ... deal with thyroid disease. , Dr. Wentz completed her graduation from the Midwestern ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... March 28, 2017 , ... ... medical society dedicated to advancing the science and clinical practice of radiosurgery, ... RSSearch Patient Registry, a multi-institutional, observational registry established to standardize data collection ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... 28, 2017 , ... Z-Medica, LLC, a leading developer and ... (UPMC) will acquire QuikClot® Bleeding Control Kits® (BCK) to equip up to 1,000 ... efforts by the American College of Surgeons, U.S. Department of Defense, Department of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/28/2017)... CITY, Calif. , March 28, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... company focused on the development and commercialization of ... pain, announced that the European Medicines Agency (EMA) ... sublingual tablet, 30 mcg) Marketing Authorisation Application (MAA) ... of the MAA is underway. The MAA for ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... Mass. , March 28, 2017 ... company developing innovative therapeutics that address significant unmet ... a patent from the Japan Patent Office (JPO) ... connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) for the treatment ... limited to skin fibrosis and proliferative retinopathy (Japanese ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... , March 28, 2017 The ... reach USD 8.0 billion by 2025, according to a ... incidence of infectious diseases and cancer is expected to ... disease diagnosis over the coming years. In addition, higher ... autologous and allogenic stem cell therapy, due to adverse ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: