Navigation Links
Teen Girls Who Smoke May Up Risk for Future Bone Disease
Date:12/4/2012

TUESDAY, Dec. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Teen girls who smoke may be at greater risk for osteoporosis, according to a new study that found girls who smoke build up less bone during this critical growth period in their lives.

In osteoporosis, bones lose mineral density and become brittle. People with the condition -- which is much more common in women than men -- are susceptible to fractures.

"As much bone is accrued in the two years surrounding a girl's first menstrual cycle as is lost in the last four decades of life," said principal investigator, Lorah Dorn, director of research in the division of adolescent medicine at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, in a center news release.

The researchers examined how smoking, depression, anxiety and alcohol affected the buildup of bone among 262 girls ranging in age from 11 to 19 years old.

Over the course of three years, the girls underwent clinical exams and had their total body bone mineral content and bone mineral density measured. The girls were also asked if they had any symptoms of depression or anxiety, and reported how often they smoked or used alcohol.

Although all the girls had about the same bone mass at the age of 13, regardless of how much they smoked, those who smoked frequently were found to have a lower rate of lumbar spine and total hip bone mineral density by age 19 than girls who smoked less.

More significant symptoms of depression were also associated with lower bone mineral density in the lumbar spine among girls in all age groups. Meanwhile, alcohol had no affect girls' bone mineral density.

"To our knowledge this is the first longitudinal study to test and demonstrate that smoking by girls, as well as symptoms of depression, have a negative impact on bone accrual during adolescence," Dorn said.

However, larger studies incorporating other races (the study included black and white girls) and geographic areas are needed, the researchers said, adding that the girls involved in their study consumed less calcium and got less physical activity than what is recommended in national guidelines.

"Osteoporosis is a costly health problem affecting an estimated 10 million Americans, with an additional 34 million considered at risk," Dorn noted.

The study was published Dec. 4 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

The study found a link between smoking and lower bone density in teen girsl; it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

More information

Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to learn more about youth and tobacco use.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, news release, Dec. 4, 2012


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Teen smoking decreases bone accumulation in girls, may increase osteoporosis risk
2. Dance boosts young girls mental health
3. Early Exposure to Stress at Home Affects Girls Brains, Study Says
4. Boys More Prone to OTC Drug Abuse Than Girls, Study Suggests
5. Weight gain worry for stressed black girls
6. Too Few Girls Get HPV Vaccine Against Cancer: CDC
7. Teen Girls Need Bone Health Advice to Stave Off Osteoporosis
8. ADHD May Raise Girls Risk for Suicide as Young Adults
9. Child Abuse Might Alter Onset of Menstruation in Girls
10. Depression Rates Rise for Girls During Teen Years
11. Girls with eating disorders regain healthy fatty acid levels when their weight normalizes
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Teen Girls Who Smoke May Up Risk for Future Bone Disease 
(Date:6/27/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Today, June 27th is PTSD Awareness Day. Over half a ... receive adequate care due to lack of effective treatments, fear of stigma or insufficient ... left untreated, veterans are at an increased risk for self-destructive behavior, including alcohol/drug abuse, ...
(Date:6/27/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 27, 2017 , ... East Los ... bites can indicate about early life experiences. What happens to a woman during pregnancy ... stresses after birth can also take a toll on a baby’s long-term health. This ...
(Date:6/26/2017)... ... June 26, 2017 , ... Torrance dentist, Dr. Robert Mondavi DDS , ... most noticeable aspects of a person’s appearance. A healthy, radiant smile can make a ... balanced teeth, everyone can have the smile of their dreams with cosmetic dentistry. , ...
(Date:6/26/2017)... ... June 26, 2017 , ... ... & Sexual Medicine Specialists, in collaboration with the Fertility Center of California, is ... care: PESA (percutaneous epidydimal sperm aspiration) and TESA (percutaneous testicular sperm extraction). These ...
(Date:6/26/2017)... ... June 26, 2017 , ... ... a recent review of government data released by the United Soybean Board. ... practices, Maryland’s soybean farmers have increased their productivity on less land per bushel, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/16/2017)... , June 16, 2017  Exactly 50 years ago ... off what later became known as the San Francisco "Summer ... ) is unveiling two radical innovations in strategic market research ... This announcement marks the beginning of Northern Light,s "Summer of ... ...
(Date:6/14/2017)... -- The Bio Supply Management Alliance (BSMA) has announced ... and the Biomedical Manufacturing Network to advance the ... California by providing a platform for imparting ... development. The primary focus of this alliance is to ... as small and mid-sized biomedical companies. ...
(Date:6/13/2017)... June 13, 2017 Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. (NYSE ... announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has ... 2015 relating to its Zhejiang, China ... "The successful clearance of the Warning Letter related ... facility is a measure of the progress we have made ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: