Navigation Links
Teamwork cuts out unnecessary biopsies, researchers find
Date:7/22/2008

ST. LOUIS Unnecessary biopsies could be a thing of the past for patients undergoing treatment for head and neck cancer. New Saint Louis University research found that when nuclear medicine clinicians and treating physicians work together to interpret PET-CT scan results, the accuracy dramatically improves, sparring patients unnecessary pain and suffering.

Often used prior to and after cancer treatment, the highly sensitive PET-CT has improved the ability to detect and treat head and neck cancer. However, it can give a significant number of false positive results, which then require a biopsy to rule out cancer that could have been left behind during the initial treatment.

According to Mark Varvares, M.D., the study's lead author and the Donald and Marlene Jerome Endowed Chair in Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery at Saint Louis University, both nuclear medicine and treating physicians have become better at interpreting PET-CT scans.

"If we improve the accuracy of the scans by including clinical information, the treating physician or cancer specialist will be able to say with confidence that we do not need to biopsy something that it's just post-operative inflammation."

Unnecessary biopsies are dangerous for head and neck cancer patients who have already undergone intensive radiation and chemotherapy. It can create a non-healing situation that can result in a catastrophic event, such as needing to remove the voice box, Varvares explained.

Varvares and his colleagues studied the scan results of 180 head and neck cancer patients who had undergone evaluation with PET-CT prior to and after treatment. To study the added value of including clinical information, they compared the incidence of false positive findings from PET-CT scans with those that both nuclear medicine and treating physicians had evaluated.

Alone, PET-CT scans produced a false positive rate of 65 percent and a false negative rate of 8 percent. However, when clinical information was included, the false positive rate dropped to 14 percent and the false negative rate dropped to 2 percent.

"Excellent communication between the nuclear medicine physician and treating clinician is crucial to improving scan accuracy," Varvares said.

In addition to improving the care of head and neck cancer patients, Varvares says that improving the accuracy of PET-CT scans and limiting the number of biopsies needed has the potential to be more cost-effective.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sara Savat
ssavat@slu.edu
314-977-8018
Saint Louis University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. From Jet Engines to Search Engines, ORBIS-FedEx-Indiana University Join Forces to Fight Unnecessary Childhood Blindness
2. Research Study Shows That Pharmaceutical Field Sales Reps Productivity Inhibited by Unnecessary Internal Communication
3. Invasive methods unnecessary for prostate cancer radiation therapy treatment planning
4. Annual Trachoma Treatments May Be Unnecessary
5. MRI and PET/CT can prevent unnecessary treatment of some cervical cancer patients
6. Verathon(R) Offers Enhanced BladderScan(R) Instrument as Part of Continued Program to Eliminate Unnecessary Catheterizations, Decrease Urinary Tract Infections and Assist in Hospital Infection Control
7. New test for joint infection could spare some patients an unnecessary procedure
8. Precancerous Breast Lesions Cause Unnecessary Worry
9. Follow-up imaging of benign-appearing incidental adrenal masses is unnecessary
10. Donde West Death Highlights Unnecessary Risk of General Anesthesia for Cosmetic Surgery, Asserts Dr. Friedberg
11. Many Vaccine Booster Shots Unnecessary: Study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... of Bruton Memorial Library on June 21 due to a possible lice infestation, as reported ... head lice: the parasite’s ability to live away from a human host, and to infest ... in the event that lice have simply gotten out of control. , As lice are ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... As a lifelong Southern Californian, ... and his M.D from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He trained ... Angeles to complete his fellowship in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai program where ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 25, 2016 , ... Conventional wisdom preaches the benefits of moderation, whether it’s ... setting the bar too high can result in disappointment, perhaps even self-loathing. However, those ... goal. , Research from PsychTests.com reveals that behind the tendency to ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , ... June 24, 2016 , ... June 19, 2016 ... dangers associated with chronic pain and the benefits of holistic treatments, Serenity Recovery ... are suffering with Sickle Cell Disease. , Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a disorder ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... Global law ... magazine’s 2016 Legal Elite. The attorneys chosen by their peers for this recognition are ... , Seven Greenberg Traurig Shareholders received special honors as members of this year’s Legal ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... N.C. , June 24, 2016  Consumers ... decisions and regulators/payers have placed more emphasis on ... environment, patient support programs in the pharmaceutical industry ... patients, medications. Consequently, pharmaceutical companies are focusing on ... they are providing products and services that improve ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... June 24, 2016 Research ... "Structural Electronics 2015-2025: Applications, Technologies, Forecasts" ... In-Mold Electronics, Smart Skin, Structural Health ... Structural electronics involves electronic and/or electrical ... structures, replacing dumb structures such as vehicle bodies ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016 According ... by Type (Standard Pen Needles, Safety Pen Needles), Needle ... GLP-1, Growth Hormone), Mode of Purchase (Retail, Non-Retail) - ... This report studies the market for the forecast period ... reach USD 2.81 Billion by 2021 from USD 1.65 ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: