Navigation Links
Team discovers new inhibitors of estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells
Date:6/16/2008

Researchers have discovered a new family of agents that inhibit the growth of estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells. The finding, described today at a meeting of the Endocrine Society, has opened an avenue of research into new drugs to combat estrogen-dependent breast cancers.

"This cell-based study is exciting because it suggests these compounds are likely to be effective in tumors that remain dependent on estrogen for growth but are resistant to current therapies," said principal investigator David J. Shapiro, a professor of biochemistry in the School of Molecular and Cellular Biology at the University of Illinois.

Although multiple factors contribute to the development of breast cancer, estrogens play a key role in the growth of many tumors. More than 80 percent of breast cancer tumors in women over age 45 are activated by estrogen by way of a protein called an estrogen receptor. When estrogen binds to the receptor, this "estrogen-receptor complex" latches on to DNA and prompts it to transcribe the RNA blueprints for new proteins that promote cell growth, migration and division.

Current therapies for estrogen-receptor-positive (ER-positive) breast cancers include the use of drugs, such as tamoxifen, that interfere with estrogen's ability to bind to the estrogen receptor. Over time, however, ER-positive breast cancer tumors become resistant to tamoxifen. In some resistant tumors, tamoxifen even begins to act like estrogen and actually stimulates tumor growth.

"Tamoxifen is useful in that it is very effective at blocking recurrence of breast cancer in patients for whom the entire tumor is removed," Shapiro said. "But for patients who still have existing tumors, eventually those tumors will become resistant."

Shapiro's team sought to target other steps in the pathway of estrogen action. Using a technique they developed that can quickly determine whether the target DNA is or is not bound by the estrogen-receptor complex, the team was able to screen a long list of potential therapeutic compounds to see if they inhibited the binding of the complex to the DNA. They then tested these agents in ER-positive breast cancer cells.

The team identified several compounds that reduce the binding of estrogen-receptor complex to the regulatory regions of genes that are normally activated by this complex. These agents effectively retarded production of the proteins that promote the growth and proliferation of ER-positive breast cancer cells.

"These small molecules specifically block growth of estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells with little or no effect on other cells," Shapiro said. "This work sets the stage for further development and testing of these inhibitors."


'/>"/>

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. OHSU Cancer Institute researcher discovers what fuels certain cancer mutation
2. Research discovers new compounds active against tuberculosis and malaria
3. OHSU cancer institute researcher discovers new predictor of prostate cancer recurrence
4. NYU dental professor discovers biological clock
5. U of Minnesota researcher discovers the starting point of sun-induced skin cancer
6. Silencing small but mighty cancer inhibitors
7. Effect of tumor necrosis factor a inhibitors on heart failure risk in RA Patients
8. NSAIDs: Painkillers, inflammation inhibitors, anti-cancer drugs and new de-methylating agents
9. Gastric juice for diagnosis of H. pylori infection in patients on proton pump inhibitors
10. FDA Approves NOVO NORDISKs NovoSeven(R) RT (Coagulation Factor VIIa [Recombinant] Room Temperature Stable) for Hemophilia Patients With Inhibitors
11. Survival differences by race most apparent in advanced stages of breast cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/2/2016)... , ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... of "Cardiovascular Health" in USA Today, which covers the innovative treatments, therapeutic technologies, ... while maintaining fulfilling lives. “We are prolonging life 6 years in the last ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 02, 2016 , ... Rijuven Corp launches rejiva ( http://www.rejiva.com ... and night. No other wearable health technology on the market can deliver all that ... poeple more meaningful insights about their health than the usual heart rate and steps ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... pharmaceutical organizations to build intelligent, connected applications, was named the best Sales Team ... , The winner announcement was made today by the Software & Information Industry ...
(Date:11/30/2016)... ... 30, 2016 , ... "I hate when the mixture of saliva and toothpaste ... an inventor from Bridgewater, N.J. "I thought that there had to be a way ... developed the patent-pending DEFLECTOR to prevent saliva and toothpaste from running down the brush ...
(Date:11/30/2016)... , ... November 30, 2016 , ... ... tech functions and stylish design wanted by today’s consumers at an affordable price, ... Darin Philip says the new watch is “a game changer” when it comes ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/2/2016)... , Dec. 2, 2016 CVS Health ... annual Analyst Day in New York City on Thursday, December 15, 2016, ... Health leadership team will provide an in-depth review of ... shareholder value. The company will also discuss 2017 earnings ... video webcast of the event will be broadcast simultaneously ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... On Thursday, the NASDAQ Composite and ... the Dow Jones Industrial Average managed to stay in green. ... which prompted Stock-callers this morning to look at the performances ... NUVA ), Smith & Nephew PLC (NYSE: SNN ... Cesca Therapeutics Inc. (NASDAQ: KOOL ). You can ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... -- Around the corners of world, cancer has infused ... present over earth. Cancer has become one of those ... time this is because of the increasing incidence rates ... steady increase in global cancer incidence with its associated ... of treatment, there is increasing interest in this stringent ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: