Navigation Links
Team designs a bandage that spurs, guides blood vessel growth

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Researchers have developed a bandage that stimulates and directs blood vessel growth on the surface of a wound. The bandage, called a "microvascular stamp," contains living cells that deliver growth factors to damaged tissues in a defined pattern. After a week, the pattern of the stamp "is written in blood vessels," the researchers report.

A paper describing the new approach will appear as the January 2012 cover article of the journal Advanced Materials.

"Any kind of tissue you want to rebuild, including bone, muscle or skin, is highly vascularized," said University of Illinois chemical and biomolecular engineering professor Hyunjoon Kong, a co-principal investigator on the study with electrical and computer engineering professor Rashid Bashir. "But one of the big challenges in recreating vascular networks is how we can control the growth and spacing of new blood vessels."

"The ability to pattern functional blood vessels at this scale in living tissue has not been demonstrated before," Bashir said. "We can now write features in blood vessels."

Other laboratories have embedded growth factors in materials applied to wounds in an effort to direct blood vessel growth. The new approach is the first to incorporate live cells in a stamp. These cells release growth factors in a more sustained, targeted manner than other methods, Kong said.

The stamp is nearly 1 centimeter across and is built of layers of a hydrogel made of polyethylene glycol (an FDA-approved polymer used in laxatives and pharmaceuticals) and methacrylic alginate (an edible, Jell-O-like material). The stamp is porous, allowing small molecules to leak through, and contains channels of various sizes to direct the flow of larger molecules, such as growth factors.

The researchers tested the stamp on the surface of a chicken embryo. After a week the stamp was removed, revealing a network of new blood vessels that mirrored the pattern of the channels in the stamp.

"This is a first demonstration that the blood vessels are controlled by the biomaterials," Kong said.

The researchers see many potential applications for the new stamp, from directing the growth of blood vessels around a blocked artery, to increasing the vascularization of tissues with poor blood flow, to "normalizing" blood vessels that feed a tumor to improve the delivery of anti-cancer drugs. Enhancing the growth of new blood vessels in a coordinated pattern after surgery may also reduce recovery time and lessen the amount of scar tissue, the researchers said.

In another study published in 2011, the team developed a biodegradable material that supports living cells. Future research will test whether the new material also can be used a stamp.

Contact: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Related medicine news :

1. U-M receives NIH, FDA grant to study adaptive clinical trial designs
2. FusionLab Designs Thomson Reuters iPad Application Interface for Financial Professionals, Students and Market Enthusiasts
3. Semantic Designs Announces a New Family of Tools for PHP Software
4. New Designs for Health Probiotic Toothpaste -- A Breakthrough in Oral Health
5. Latest Resource From Dynamic Disc Designs Helps Physicians Educate Patients
6. HCG True Diet Redesigns Its Website to Differentiate Its Brand from Competitors
7. CEIT-IK4 designs tool for operations on people with severe or profound auditory loss
8. Top Dentist in Laguna Niguel, Dr. Todd Snyder of Aesthetic Dental Designs, to Provide Six Month Smiles Cosmetic Braces
9. Enterprise PDM Integration has Never Been Easier; Zero Wait-State Announces Leading SolidWorks Reseller GoEngineer as Master Distributor for DesignState
10. Sculptor Doug Roper Designs Bronze Sculpture for Morgan's Wonderland Park
11. Pioneering stem cell bandage receives approval for clinical trial
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Team designs a bandage that spurs, guides blood vessel growth
(Date:11/28/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Trying to relax on a couch can actually be uncomfortable, ... this design due to personal experience with a bad back," he said. , This ... as well as increases support. It also makes it easier to eat, do other ...
(Date:11/28/2015)... ... November 28, 2015 , ... Pixel Film Studios is ... panels to choose from, the possibilities are endless. Users have full control over angle ... ProPanel: Pulse masking effects, users are sure to get heads to turn. , ProPanel: ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... , ... According to an article published November 13th on, ... D.C. revolved around the fact that proper dental care, both at-home and in the ... between periodontal disease (more commonly referred to as gum disease) and diabetes. According to ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... CO (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... According ... cities are not changing the way that they are handling security in light of ... police and security presence in an attempt to stop an attack from reaching U.S. ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... 27, 2015 , ... A team of Swiss doctors has released a report ... has just posted the findings on the website. Click here to read the ... 136 mesothelioma patients who were treated with chemotherapy followed by EPP surgery. Among the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... , November 26, 2015 ... "Self Administration of High Viscosity Drugs" ... ) has announced the addition of the ... to their offering. --> Research and ... of the "Self Administration of High Viscosity ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... , November 26, 2015 ... of the "Radioimmunoassay Market by Type ... Pharmaceutical Industry, Academics, Clinical Diagnostic Labs), Application ... Forecast to 2020" report to their ... announced the addition of the "Radioimmunoassay ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ) ... "Global Brain Monitoring Devices Market 2015-2019" ... ) has announced the addition of ... 2015-2019" report to their offering. ... ) has announced the addition of the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: