Navigation Links
Targeted agent addition to herceptin has positive effect on metastatic HER-2 breast cancer
Date:7/8/2011

Houston - Adding Afinitor to Herceptin, the main treatment for HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, helps some women with disease that has been resistant to previous Herceptin-based therapies, according to a study led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

The Phase I/II study demonstrated that a combination of the targeted therapies, which play different roles in cancer, offers a personalized therapy approach that can help some patients with advanced disease. Thirty-four percent of the women in the study benefited from the regimen.

About one in four breast cancer tumors is HER2-positive, which means it makes too much of the protein HER2, a human epidermal growth factor. This type of breast cancer often is more aggressive and difficult to treat.

"Herceptin (trastuzumab) works well for many patients, but about 30 percent of those with advanced disease do not respond to the drug, even combined with chemotherapy," said PK Morrow, M.D., assistant professor in the Department of Breast Medical Oncology and lead co-author of the study. "Even if metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer initially responds to Herceptin, the disease usually eventually progresses on standard Herceptin-based therapy."

Resistance to Herceptin has been linked to activation of the PI3K/mTOR cancer pathway. PTEN, a protein that acts as a tumor suppressor, can counteract P13K. However in the absence of PTEN, the mTOR cancer pathway may be activated. Afinitor (everolimus) overcomes resistance by inhibiting the mTOR pathway.

Bench-to-Bedside Research

"Combining these two agents offers patients with metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer a chemotherapy-free option," Morrow said. "Despite the fact that most of these women had received multiple chemotherapy regimens, this regimen offered additional clinical benefit and less toxicity for many of patients."

Built on preclinical studies at MD Anderson that showed mTOR inhibition makes mice with HER2-positive and PTEN-deficient breast tumors more sensitive to Herceptin, the study was part of MD Anderson's and Dana- Farber Cancer Institute's breast cancer SPORE (Specialized Program of Research Excellence) grant from the National Cancer Institute.

"This study is important to breast cancer treatment, and it represents a crucial step toward personalized cancer therapy by increasing our understanding of cancer pathways," said Francisco J. Esteva, M.D., Ph.D., professor in MD Anderson's Department of Breast Medical Oncology and corresponding author. "It's the culmination of more than five years, starting with basic research and animal studies, and an excellent example of bench-to-bedside research."

Approach Shows Promise

Presented in part at the 2010 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the study stemmed from two concurrent trials at MD Anderson and Dana-Farber. Forty-seven women with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer that had progressed on Herceptin-based therapy were given Herceptin every three weeks and Afinitor daily. Almost half the women had previously received two or more chemotherapy regimens.

The combination therapy resulted in partial responses in 15 percent of patients and persistent stable disease in 19 percent of patients, resulting in a clinical benefit rate of 34 percent. Median progression-free survival was four months. Treatment was well tolerated, and side effects, which included fatigue, infection and mouth sores, were manageable.

Patients with PTEN loss had lower rates of overall survival, but progression-free survival was not affected, suggesting that PTEN loss enables activation of pathways that promote cancer growth. However, PIK3 mutations did not significantly affect progression-free survival or overall survival. The finding that progression-free survival was not significantly affected by PTEN loss or PIK3 mutation suggests that the addition of Afinitor may slow tumor progression through inhibition of mTOR.


'/>"/>

Contact: Laura Sussman
lsussman@mdanderson.org
713-745-2457
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Targeted cancer therapy kills prostate tumor cells
2. Benefit of targeted lung cancer therapy confirmed
3. Matching targeted therapies to tumors specific gene mutations key to personalized cancer treatment
4. Targeted testing offers treatment hope for ovarian cancer patients
5. Targeted regeneration could be key to boosting coalfield communities
6. New technology fuses MRI, ultrasound to achieve targeted biopsy of prostate cancer
7. A new study on self-injury behavior encourages quick and targeted intervention
8. IU-Regenstrief programs targeted to alleviate shortage of health IT workforce
9. Targeted agent selumetinib shows promise in biliary cancer
10. Primary care targeted for suicide prevention efforts
11. Modern targeted drug plus old malaria pill serve a 1-2 punch in advanced cancer patients
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... December 06, 2016 , ... The OSHA Training Center ... Education Center headquartered in Northern California, has announced the addition of a Public ... health training to public sector employees. , “The primary goal of the Public ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... Angeles (PRWEB) , ... December 05, 2016 , ... What: ... feed of the North Pole to our patients – using a video monitor and ... video. The hospital will transform the Auditorium into a Christmas Wonderland, which is where ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... ... December 05, 2016 , ... The Avamere Family of ... Avamere Transitional Care of Puget Sound ; located at 630 S Pearl ... will provide patients recovering from illness or injury with intensive skilled nursing and ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... ... December 05, 2016 , ... ... relationship-marketing firm, announced today that nominations will be accepted from December 5, ... Central Awards. , Awards include the Information Security Executive® of the Year, ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... ... December 05, 2016 , ... “Epilepsy Awareness,” which can ... 6th, sparks a conversation about epilepsy, bearing down on the social stigma and ... be diagnosed with epilepsy within their lifetime. With such a large percentage of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/5/2016)... , Dec. 5, 2016  Breckenridge Pharmaceutical, Inc. ... multi-product marketing agreement with development and manufacturing partner ... Under the terms of this agreement, Breckenridge will ... in the United States . ... tentatively-approved ANDA. The products cover a wide range ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... and PUNE, India , December ... report by Allied Market Research, titled, "Global Cancer Biomarkers Market ... revenue of cancer biomarkers market is projected to reach $15,737 ... CAGR of 13.3% from 2016 to 2022. Omic technologies segment ... 2015 and is expected to maintain its dominance during the ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... FRANCISCO , Dec. 5, 2016  Recently ... a methylation age predictor, known as Horvath,s Clock. ... offering a sample analysis service to academic and ... of any human sample, other than sperm. The ... to accurately estimate biological age versus chronological age ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: