Navigation Links
Tailored Treatment Boosts Kidney Cancer Survival
Date:11/1/2008

Study concludes one-size-fits-all therapy needs to be changed

SATURDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Personalized treatment of kidney cancer patients can increase survival, according to a UCLA study of almost 1,500 patients that identified subsets of kidney cancer that behave differently and need to be treated accordingly.

The UCLA team said their findings indicate the traditional one-size-fits-all treatment approach needs to be changed.

"We have shown that not all kidney cancer patients are the same, not all localized kidney cancers are the same, and not all metastatic kidney cancers are the same," study senior author Dr. Arie Belldegrun, a professor of urology and a researcher at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, said in a UCLA news release.

Patients with localized kidney cancer can have either low-, intermediate-, or high-risk cancers based on the chance for recurrence, the researchers found. Patients with kidney cancer that's spread (metastatic cancer) can also be categorized into similar subsets.

"Now we can base treatment decisions based on that," Belldegrun said.

Patients with localized, low-risk kidney cancer have a projected five-year survival rate of 97 percent and a 10-year survival rate of 92 percent, compared to 81 percent and 61 percent for patients with localized, intermediate-risk cancer, and 62 percent and 41 percent for patients with localized, high-risk cancer.

"All these patients with cancers that have not spread present to their doctors with presumably localized disease, and in the past, they may have been treated the same way. They need to be treated individually, according to their risk levels," Belldegrun said.

For example, the UCLA team showed that surgery alone can produce excellent outcomes in patients with localized, low-risk, kidney cancer, meaning they could be spared the harsh side effects associated with radiation or immunotherapy. But surgery alone isn't sufficient for patients with localized, high-risk kidney cancer.

Patients with metastatic, low-risk cancer should get very aggressive treatment, because there's a good chance the therapy will benefit them. But patients with metastatic, high-risk cancer may choose to decline treatment, because they'll get little or no benefit from it.

"Our paper identifies, very precisely, which patients should get which therapies," Belldegrun said.

The study was published in the Nov. 1 issue of Cancer.

More information

The American Urological Association has more about kidney cancer.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: University of California, Los Angeles, news release, Nov. 1, 2008


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Upscale Seattle-Based Skincare Clinic Expands Into California With Unique Custom Tailored Skincare Approach
2. Suboxone Fast Passing Methadone As Preferred Method Of Treatment For Opiate Detox
3. ENT doctors release national guideline on treatment for common cause of dizziness
4. Landmark UCLA study finds aggresive, personalized treatment increases kidney cancer patient survival
5. Study reports Double Balloon Endoscopy useful for diagnosis and treatment of obscure GI bleeding
6. Health Secretary Raises Awareness About Diabetes; Rising Costs of Treatment
7. If metastasectomy should be performed before other treatments
8. A useful imaging modality for monitoring treatment response to hepatocellular carcinoma
9. Combo Treatment Best for Anxiety Disorder in Kids
10. Researchers identify mechanism, possible drug treatment for tumors in neurofibromatosis
11. PURE Bioscience Granted US Patent on SDC for Food Treatment
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Tailored Treatment Boosts Kidney Cancer Survival
(Date:3/30/2017)... ... ... Nutrition Education for the Public (NEP), a dietetic practice ... Nutrition Partnership (SNP) in presenting “Eating Heart Healthy: Exploring Issues of Low Seafood ... inform consumers about the health benefits of eating a seafood-rich diet. , ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... March 30, 2017 , ... ... organizations submitted a letter to President Trump expressing their support for an independent ... doctors, two Ph.D. scientists and one medical journalist, will hold a press conference ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... ... ARI Network Services, Inc. (NASDAQ: ARIS) announced today that Rhino Ag has named ... more than 650 U.S.-based dealers. Rhino, a member of the Alamo Group, offers a ... cutters, rear blades, post hole diggers, pasture renovators, tillers, disc mowers and box blades. ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... York City, NY (PRWEB) , ... March 29, ... ... body for men’s and women’s professional squash, announced it has enlisted New York ... partner. The agency will develop and procure sponsorship opportunities for the Professional ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... , ... March 30, 2017 , ... Grass pollen is the main cause of hay ... the stuff. The season for grass pollen runs from May to July each year; with ... fever victim to do? HayMax™ allergen barrier balms ( http://www.haymax.us ) provide an effective defense ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/29/2017)... SAN DIEGO , March 29, 2017 Avelas Biosciences, ... care from diagnosis through treatment, today announced that Carmine N. ... of the company at the Needham & Company 16 th ... EDT (8:20 a.m. PDT) at the Westin Grand Central Hotel in ... Biosciences ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... Today, CVS Health officials (NYSE: CVS ... of Public Health Director Gerd Clabaugh and Office ... announcing the availability of the opioid overdose-reversal medicine naloxone without ... Health has established a standing order with physicians in ... access to the medication in the state.   ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... WALNUT CREEK, Calif. , Mar 29, 2017 ... tissue-sparing, cervical-fusion technology, announced the addition of two ... Scott Lynch has joined the company to ... is assuming International leadership.  Together, Mr. Lynch and ... industry experience.  Mr. Lynch joins ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: