Navigation Links
TB Vaccine Promising as New Way to Fight Type 1 Diabetes
Date:8/9/2012

By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A small trial of a vaccine already approved for tuberculosis found that the vaccine can kill the rogue autoimmune cells that are active players in type 1 diabetes.

There were no changes, however, in the need for insulin among those with longstanding diabetes who got the vaccine, the researchers added.

"What we saw with two vaccines, given four weeks apart, was the death of bad T-cells," said study author Dr. Denise Faustman, director of the immunobiology laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. "We also saw that regulatory T-cells came on -- these are the good-guy T-cells. And the pancreas went on briefly, and this was in people who were 15 years out from their type 1 diagnosis."

"This doesn't mean that people were throwing their insulin syringes away," Faustman said. "But the exciting part is that even decades after the disease begins, the cells in the pancreas can kick in again."

Results of the study appear online Aug. 8 in the journal PLOS One.

The vaccine, which has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, is called bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), and has been used against tuberculosis for about 90 years, Faustman said. BCG also is used as a treatment for bladder cancer.

The vaccine works by increasing levels of a substance known as tumor necrosis factor (TNF). High doses of TNF can be toxic, but the vaccine doesn't appear to raise levels of TNF too high.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the only groups that shouldn't receive the live vaccine are those whose immune systems are compromised, such as people who have HIV or people who have received an organ transplant. The CDC also recommends against giving the vaccine to pregnant women because it hasn't been well-studied in this population.

In 2001, Faustman's team tested a similar substance in mice and found that it destroyed the harmful T-cells and allowed the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas to regenerate and produce insulin.

The question was: Would such regeneration take place in humans with type 1 diabetes if the immune-system attack that causes type 1 diabetes in the first place was stopped?

To answer that question, Faustman and her colleagues recruited six people with type 1 diabetes who were randomly assigned to receive two injections of either the vaccine or a placebo, and they were compared to one control group without diabetes and one with the disease.

The average duration of type 1 diabetes at the beginning of the study was 15.3 years, and the average age of those with diabetes was 35.

During the 20-week study, two out of the three people treated with BCG had evidence of bad T-cell death and increases in the levels of protective T-cells. They also showed an elevation in levels of a substance called C-peptide that indicates insulin production.

Faustman said it's not clear why BCG didn't appear to help one of those treated with it, but, she added, at the end of the study, the individual's level of C-peptide began to increase.

She also said it's not yet certain whether more frequent doses or higher doses would be needed to restore more pancreatic function, but it may matter how long someone has had the disease.

Faustman said, however, that no matter how long someone has had the disease, they'll likely get some function back.

"We may only restore 5, 10, 20, 50 or 60 percent of function -- we just don't know yet -- but any restoration of C-peptide helps to prevent diabetes complications," she said.

One expert said the finding was important, but many questions remain.

"This study shows that by increasing TNF, they can induce the death of the autoreactive T-cells that destroy the cells that make insulin, and they transiently increase C-peptide levels," said Dr. Spyros Mezitis, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "But what happens after 20 weeks? How often would they need to give this vaccine?"

"I'm concerned about increasing the levels of TNF in the body," he added. "They're saying that only the insulin-secreting cells are affected, but what are the long-term effects if it's given repeatedly? What about the growing cells in children, because if it works it would be used in children."

Still, he said, "this is important research that helps us understand the pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes."

Faustman said that BCG has an excellent safety record, and has been given to billions of adults and children worldwide to prevent tuberculosis.

Faustman and her colleagues are currently developing phase II trials to test using higher levels of the vaccine.

More information

Learn more about type 1 diabetes from the National Library of Medicine.

SOURCES: Denise Faustman, M.D., Ph.D., director, immunobiology laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Spyros Mezitis, M.D., endocrinologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Aug. 8, 2012 PLOS One, online


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. New Vaccine May Offer Protection From Deadly Nipah Virus
2. CDC Preparing Vaccine for New Swine Flu
3. Poor Sleep Hampers Vaccine Effectiveness: Study
4. Is Improved Vaccine Causing Whooping Cough Outbreaks?
5. Sleep affects potency of vaccines
6. NIDA supports development of combined anti-heroin and HIV vaccine
7. Scientists explore new class of synthetic vaccines
8. Mount Sinai researchers discover new target for vaccine development in abundant immune cells
9. Researchers study vaccine as potential weapon against aggressive brain tumors
10. Duke receives new grant for AIDS vaccine research
11. Parental consent for HPV vaccine should not be waived, poll says
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
TB Vaccine Promising as New Way to Fight Type 1 Diabetes
(Date:2/12/2016)... Seattle, WA, and Washington, DC (PRWEB) , ... ... ... PATH and the Siemens Foundation today announced a new initiative—the Siemens ... technologies for low-resource settings. The partnership will recruit top students from U.S. ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... Falls Church, VA (PRWEB) , ... February 12, 2016 , ... CDRH Enforcement Trends: , ... http://www.fdanews.com/cdrhenforcementtrends , As Winston Churchill said, “Those who don’t learn ... 2015 will show what to expect when they come knocking this year. But that takes ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... Each year, the American Physical Therapy Association ... CA at the Anaheim Convention Center. Almost 10,000 physical therapists across the country are ... action, learn more about their chosen field and network with their colleagues. As ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... Coco Libre, the maker ... Red Carpet Events LA GRAMMY’s Style Lounge Event. Coco Libre will offer musicians and ... hydrated before the big event. The invitation-only gifting suite, held this year at the ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... Appleton, Wis. (PRWEB) , ... February 12, 2016 ... ... its second Lean Leadership Series at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital on April ... to practice new behaviors and create new habits. The workshops cover a broad ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/12/2016)... , 12 februari 2016 ... een toonaangevende leverancier van productie en ontwikkeling ... industrieën, kondigt vandaag een uitbreiding aan van ... haar locatie in Charleston, SC ... geleid tot meerdere recente investeringen. ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... -- The primary goal of this research is to ... usage of liquid biopsy. Key information the survey seeks ... of liquid biopsy adoption amidst future users - Predominantly ... - Sample inflow to conduct liquid biopsy tests - ... so on. - Correlation analysis of sample type and ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... 11, 2016  Walgreens has committed to provide drug ... Washington, D.C. as part of a ... commended by shareholder advocacy organization As You Sow. ... "Many people hold on to unneeded drugs because they lack ... consequences." --> Conrad MacKerron , Senior Vice ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: