Navigation Links
Survey could help pediatricians better treat patients
Date:1/22/2009

GAINESVILLE Pediatricians usually have about seven minutes to sit face-to-face with patients during a typical visit. It's barely enough time to perform an exam, let alone assess how a child is faring at school or at home.

But understanding how well children function emotionally and socially could help pediatricians pinpoint health problems that might otherwise go undetected. Now, University of Florida researchers have developed a way for doctors to measure and interpret quality of life to understand how it affects a child's health, according to findings published online last week in the journal Value in Health.

Led by I-Chan Huang, Ph.D., a UF assistant professor of epidemiology and health policy research, UF researchers have established a range of scores that will allow doctors to understand the results of a quality-of-life survey in the same way they understand a blood pressure test.

The survey, called the Pediatrics Quality of Life Inventory, is widely used by researchers to measure whether certain treatments improve quality of life for patients, but they had no way to do the opposite find out if quality of life could be linked to certain health problems. Although researchers could measure whether their subjects' quality of life scores went up or down over time, doctors could not interpret whether test results were normal or red flags for hidden health problems because there was no baseline for normal.

For doctors, reading the survey results was sort of like trying to understand a blood pressure test without knowing what normal blood pressure should be.

"We believe the use of this new method allows us to expand the usefulness of the pediatric quality of life survey to capture different aspects of health status," Huang said.

To establish baseline scores for the survey, the researchers interviewed 1,745 parents of children enrolled in two state-funded health programs, pairing quality of life results with previously recorded health information.

The survey includes questions about different aspects of children's lives, from how well they get along with peers to whether they have trouble walking around the block.

Although it won't replace a doctor's clinical exam, the survey could arm pediatricians with new information that could help them better treat their patients, says Lindsay A. Thompson, M.D., a UF pediatrician who collaborated with Huang on the study.

"It's complementary information, and it's going to reveal something different than what I can get from my clinical exam," Thompson said. "It's a new set of data that physicians can use in an easy way."

Aside from giving doctors a closer look at their patients, the survey could also help nurses and professionals working in community health settings determine whether they should refer patients to a doctor, said Elizabeth Shenkman, Ph.D., the senior author of the study and the director of the UF Institute for Child Health Policy.

But before doctors or nurses can use the survey in the clinic, more studies need to be done to test the research, particularly in different populations of children. The children researchers studied were all enrolled in state-funded health programs, which could skew the results because lower socioeconomic status is often associated with poorer health outcomes, Huang said.

The researchers also need to make the survey as user-friendly as possible for busy pediatricians to incorporate into their practice, said James W. Varni, Ph.D., a professor of pediatrics and vice chairman for research at Texas A&M University. Varni, who was not involved with the UF study, developed the Pediatrics Quality of Life Inventory.

"What needs to happen next is this information should be incorporated into software for pediatricians," Varni said. "This is something kids could complete at home it could be downloaded into an electronic medical record."

Varni described UF's range of scores for the survey as an important step forward in helping doctors uncover "hidden morbidities."

"We don't know exactly how this is going to change things yet," Thompson said. "But this is another way to identify kids who may have problems that aren't being found in other ways."


'/>"/>

Contact: April Frawley Birdwell
afrawley@ufl.edu
352-273-5817
University of Florida
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Hearing Aids Offer Hope for Those Who Suffer from Persistent Ringing in the Ears, Better Hearing Institute Survey Finds
2. Survey Finds Employers Split on Impact and Cost of Migraine
3. Survey: Americans Love for Financial Security Taking Precedence over Traditional Romance This Valentines Day
4. 2009 Most Wired Survey and Benchmarking Study Opens Today
5. YWCA Survey Shows Greater Economic Concerns Among Black Women Than White Women
6. AFB Survey Finds Drug Labeling Puts People with Vision Loss at Serious Medical Risk
7. Caffeine Survey Reveals Most, Least Caffeinated Cities
8. Half of Full-Time Employees Surveyed Dont Understand Health Insurance Coverage for Cancer-Related Medical Expenses
9. Gerson Lehrman Group Partners With AdvaMed for Survey on Medical Device Industry
10. Economic Downturn Impacting Womens Ability to Plan for Long-Term Care Costs, New Survey Finds
11. Surveyed Neurologists in Both the U.S. and Europe Would Welcome an Antiepileptic Drug That is Administered Once-Daily
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/15/2017)... ... January 15, 2017 , ... "On Tour is a ... complete customization and ease," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. ... users can edit the style and animation of their slideshows. Place each slide on ...
(Date:1/15/2017)... Pa. (PRWEB) , ... January 15, 2017 , ... The ... newest location in Radnor, Pennsylvania. As construction wraps up on the 14,000+ square foot ... The Gravity Vaults sixth location, including three in New Jersey and two in New ...
(Date:1/14/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... January 13, 2017 , ... ... Body and Soul, incorporating a magnesium-rich Mediterranean diet may lower the risk of ... and Lounge notes that the many health and wellness benefits linked to a ...
(Date:1/13/2017)... , ... January 13, 2017 , ... ... raise blood sugar levels. Counting carbohydrates is as easy as checking the nutrition ... nutrient that affects blood sugar levels. Despite being sugar-free, proteins can influence — ...
(Date:1/13/2017)... ... ... KOAMTAC ®, Inc., a leading manufacturer of Bluetooth barcode scanners and ... data collector at the National Retail Federation’s Big Show (NRF17) held January 15-17 in ... market’s need for more compact and rugged devices for collecting barcode data paired with ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/16/2017)... and PUNE, India , January ... by Allied Market Research, titled, "Vital Signs Monitoring Devices Market ... Forecast, 2014-2022", projects that the global vital signs monitoring devices ... expected to reach $5,491 million by 2022, growing at a ... America was the leading regional market in global ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... PORTLAND, Oregon and PUNE, India , January 16, ... Market Research, titled, "Antioxidants Market by Type - Global Opportunity Analysis and Industry ... and is expected to reach $4,531 million by 2022, registering a CAGR of ... accounted for more than one-third share of the global volume in 2015. ... ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... 2017  Dovetail Genomics today announced the commercial launch ... which yields chromosome-scale genome assemblies. The service is available ... on Jan. 17 at the Plant & Animal Genome ... . "We are thrilled to be expanding ... Dovetail Hi-C offering," said Todd Dickinson , Dovetail,s ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: