Navigation Links
Surgical Deaths Linked to Handling of Complications
Date:9/30/2009

Staffing and hospital culture play a role, expert contends,,

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The way that a hospital handles the complications of surgery, not just the rate of those complications, determines the hospital's surgical death rate, a new study has found.

The study, which included more than 84,000 people who had surgery in U.S. hospitals, found about a twofold difference in surgical deaths between hospitals with the lowest rate and those with the highest -- 3.5 percent vs. 6.9 percent. This occurred despite a small difference in the overall rate of complications -- 24.6 percent in the hospitals with the lowest surgical mortality rate and 26.9 percent in those with the highest.

The emphasis in recent years has been on reducing the rate of surgical complications, said Dr. Justin B. Dimick, assistant professor of surgery at the University of Michigan and a co-author of the study, published in the Oct. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Many hospitals have established point-by-point checklists that surgeons go through before operating.

"Our study doesn't necessarily contradict the need for checklists," Dimick said. "There is no doubt that reducing complications is an important goal. But our data show that the reason why some hospitals aren't reducing mortality may be due to differences in the complication treatment."

To some degree, complications are inevitable in surgery, Dimick said. "We're most worried about the complications that can lead to death," he said. "About one of every six patients has complications that can lead to death."

Complications can be related to the surgery itself, including bleeding, infections and leakages, Dimick said, and they can be related to medical problems that the person having surgery might have, such as a heart attack, blood clots in the leg, kidney failure or stroke.

In hospitals with low mortality rates, 12.5 percent of people with such complications died, the study found. The death rate in the highest-mortality hospitals was 21.4 percent.

"Not much attention has been paid to the management of complications," he said. "That is where we should be looking."

The pattern could be seen in management of specific complications. For example, all the hospitals had roughly similar incidences of post-surgery bleeding. But the death rate from that complication was 50 percent higher in some hospitals than in others.

Though the new study does not directly address ways to manage surgical complications, "we can speculate," Dimick said. "A number of things in previous studies have been associated with mortality."

Hospitals with lower surgical death rates tend to have fully-staffed, 24-hour intensive care units with physicians trained to handle post-surgical emergencies. They have high nurse-to-patient ratios in their intensive care units and their wards. "The more nurses the better because there are fewer patients per nurse," Dimick said.

A less tangible factor -- "just the culture of the hospital" -- also is involved, he said. "Do people feel afraid to call the surgeon at night, are they afraid to go up the chain of command, are they not afraid of pushing the button?"

Dr. Peter Pronovost, a professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said that the study's findings don't lessen the need to prevent surgical complications and errors. Pronovost was an originator of the checklist concept.

"We have to try to prevent complications when we can," he said. "But when we can't, we must make sure that they are properly recognized and treated. This study shows that recognition and treatment has a substantial impact on a patient's risk of dying."

Studies already have shown that the availability of intensive care specialists and a high nurse-to-patient ratio improve survival, but that lesson is sometimes forgotten in current cost-cutting times, Pronovost said.

"We may have slipped a bit in that area because the workload is often quite high," he said.

More information

The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has information on what you need to know before surgery.



SOURCES: Justin B. Dimick, M.D., M.P.H., assistant professor, surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.; Peter Pronovost, M.D., Ph.D., professor, anesthesiology and critical care medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore; Oct. 1, 2009, New England Journal of Medicine


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. New study shows promise in reducing surgical risks associated with surgical bleeding
2. Pioneer Surgical Technology Hires Vice President of New Business Development
3. Symmetry Medical Completes Acquisition Of Specialty Surgical Instruments
4. Innocoll Agrees the Sale of its CollaRx(R) GENTAMICIN SURGICAL IMPLANT and European Sales and Marketing Infrastructure to EUSA Pharma
5. Revolutionary HD Surgical Footage from North Shore-LIJ Surgeon to be Broadcast for the First Time on ABCs 20/20, National Geographic Channel
6. American Heart Association Surgical Supplement Journal Report: Appropriate Hospital Discharge System Can Prevent Future Cardiac Events
7. MAKO Surgical Corp. Names Frederic H. Moll, M.D. to Board of Directors
8. Study finds limiting work hours for surgical residents enhances training
9. STAAR Surgical Reports Operational Progress
10. Stille and Enova Form Strategic Partnership to Introduce Worlds Brightest LED Cordless Surgical Headlights Into Europe and Japan
11. PEAK Surgical Announces Positive Surgical Incision Wound Healing Results With the PEAK PlasmaBlade(TM)
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 26, 2016 , ... PawPaws brand pet supplements owned by ... to enhance the health of felines. The formula is all-natural and is made from ... the PawPaws Cat Kidney Support Supplement Soft Chews are Astragalus Root Extract ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... Orion, Clarkston, Michigan (PRWEB) , ... June 26, ... ... with respect to fertility once they have been diagnosed with endometriosis. These women ... intercourse but they also require a comprehensive approach that can help for preservation ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... TX (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... Austin ... of the American College of Mohs Surgery and to Dr. Russell Peckham for medical ... and highly effective treatment for skin cancer. The selective fellowship in Mohs Micrographic Surgery ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... Aliso Viejo, California (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... preset to fit their specific project," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film ... all fully customizable and all within Final Cut Pro X . Simply select ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... As a lifelong Southern Californian, ... and his M.D from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He trained ... Angeles to complete his fellowship in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai program where ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) ... Elecsys BRAHMS PCT (procalcitonin) assay as a dedicated testing ... With this clearance, Roche is the first IVD company ... for sepsis risk assessment and management. PCT ... PCT levels in blood can aid clinicians in assessing ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , , , WHEN: ... , , , , LOCATION: , , , Online, with ... , EXPERT PANELISTS:  , , , Frost & Sullivan,s Global Vice ... Senior Industry Analyst, Divyaa Ravishankar and Unmesh Lal, Program Manager , ... industry is witnessing an exceptional era. Several new demand spaces, such ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... -- The vast majority of dialysis patients currently receive ... usually 3 times a week, with treatment times averaging ... equipment preparation and wait time.  This regimen can be ... who are elderly and frail.  Many elderly dialysis patients ... for some duration of time. Residents in ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: