Navigation Links
Surgery May Boost Survival With Dangerous Heart Condition
Date:11/22/2011

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with a condition called infective endocarditis, coupled with heart failure, heart valve surgery can reduce the risk of dying by nearly two-thirds, a new study suggests.

Infective endocarditis, an infection of the lining of the heart that often includes the heart valves, has been associated with a high risk of death. Previous studies have found that in-hospital mortality can be as high as 20 percent and death after a year can reach 40 percent.

"Cardiac surgery during hospitalization for infective endocarditis is associated with significantly lower in-hospital and one-year mortality, compared to medical therapy [drug therapy] alone, even for heart failure which is mild or moderate in severity," said lead researcher Dr. Andrew Wang, a cardiologist and associate professor of medicine at Duke University.

About one-third of patients with endocarditis experience heart failure as a complication, which is typically advanced or severe in degree and due to an acute heart valve problem, he said.

"Nearly two-thirds of patients with this complication undergo surgery during the initial hospitalization, and surgery is associated with lower mortality at one year," Wang added.

Patients with endocarditis and mild heart failure should be evaluated by a team of specialists for possible cardiac surgery, he noted. "Increased use of cardiac surgery for patients with this complication may lower the mortality rate in endocarditis," Wang said.

The study was published in the Nov. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

For the study, Wang's team looked at data from more than 4,000 patients with endocarditis of a heart valve from June 2000 to December 2006, in 61 hospitals in 28 countries.

Among patients with chest X-rays available, 33 percent had heart failure and 67 percent of these patients had heart failure so severe it limited their activities.

More than 800 of these heart failure patients underwent heart valve surgery.

Wang's group found that nearly 30 percent of the heart failure patients died in the hospital, and those who had surgery were at lower risk (20.6 percent) compared with patients treated with drug therapy alone (44.8 percent).

After one year, 29 percent of the patients who had surgery died, compared with 58 percent of the patients who were on drug therapy alone, the researchers found.

Factors connected with dying in the year after treatment included older age, diabetes, an infection contracted in the hospital, other infections, stroke and complications from the surgery, the study authors noted.

In the United States, there are about 15,000 new cases of infective endocarditis each year, according to background information in the study.

Wang noted that the average Medicare payment to hospitals for heart valve replacement surgery ranges from $25,000 to $45,000.

"In our study, surgery for patients with heart failure as a complication of endocarditis was associated with a 50 percent lower mortality, compared to medical treatment alone, so was more effective than medical therapy," he said.

Commenting on the study, Dr. Gregg Fonarow, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a spokesman for the American Heart Association, said that "infective endocarditis results in very substantial morbidity and mortality."

The risks these patients face are even higher if the infective endocarditis results in heart failure. In these patients, the benefits of valvular heart surgery generally outweigh the risk, he said.

"Current guidelines from the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology recommend surgery in patients with endocarditis complicated by heart failure, even in older patients with multiple comorbid [pre-existing] conditions," Fonarow said.

"These findings suggest that there are further opportunities to improve the care of patients with infective endocarditis, both in identifying appropriate patients for surgery and improving outcomes for those treated surgically," he added.

More information

For more on endocarditis, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCES: Andrew Wang, M.D., associate professor of medicine, Duke University, Durham, N.C.; Gregg Fonarow, M.D., professor of cardiology, University of California, Los Angeles, spokesman for the American Heart Association; Nov. 23/30, 2011, Journal of the American Medical Association


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. More Blacks Die in Hospital After Diverticulitis Surgery
2. Thin People May Be at Greater Risk for Post-Surgery Death
3. Colon Surgery Linked to High Readmission Rates
4. Painkiller Dependence Before Knee Surgery May Slow Recovery
5. Pneumonia Most Common Infection After Heart Surgery
6. Surgery on toy animals lessens anxiety of veterinary students
7. New Bypass Surgery for Stroke Riskier Than Drug Treatment
8. VCU performs separation surgery on conjoined twins
9. Prostate cancer surgery better at teaching hospitals
10. Hospital for special surgery physician-scientists share advances in rheumatology research
11. Rheumatoid arthritis patients have low expectations after knee replacement surgery
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Surgery May Boost Survival With Dangerous Heart Condition
(Date:9/20/2017)... ... September 20, 2017 , ... “Psalms of Humidity”: is a ... mind and move the readers one step closer to God. “Psalms of Humidity” is ... his mistakes that have been made within his life are the very same things ...
(Date:9/20/2017)... ... ... “They Sang At Her Funeral”: a tale of murder that will bring ... their closets. “They Sang At Her Funeral” is the creation of published author, Annalise ... five children and twelve grandchildren. Before becoming a writer, Annalise had the opportunity to ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... 19, 2017 , ... Only a few physicians were selected to receive the ... A. Clevens, MD, FACS . The founder and medical director of Clevens Face ... trained at Yale, Harvard and the University of Michigan. He has served patients throughout ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... , ... Trusted debt-reduction firm CreditAssociates, LLC has announced two important milestones. To ... $835 million in resolved debt for its clients. , Credit card debt, unpaid hospital ... of debt settled by the company. With more than a decade of combined service ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... Dallas, TX (PRWEB) , ... September 19, 2017 ... ... largest non-profit organization devoted exclusively to funding innovative lymphoma research and serving the ... services – will return to Texas as a part of its national Swirl: ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/19/2017)... 19, 2017 HistoSonics, Inc., a venture-backed medical device company developing a non-invasive, robotically ... announced three leadership team developments today:   ... ... Tom ... Veteran medical device executive Josh Stopek , PhD, who ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... --  ZirMed Inc ., a recognized leader in cloud-based revenue ... been ranked #1 by its users for the seventh consecutive ... Survey. ZirMed was recognized as the top-ranked end-to-end revenue cycle ... over 200 beds and holds one of the longest #1 ... ...
(Date:9/18/2017)... , Pa. and KALAMAZOO, Mich. , ... Allentown, Penn. , and OptiMed Specialty Pharmacy of ... business partnership to offer a strategic hub service that ... Healthcare,s highly sought-after personal spirometer, Spiro PD 2.0, and ... A spirometer is a medical device used to ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: