Navigation Links
Support for Breast-Feeding Found Lacking in Many U.S. Hospitals
Date:8/2/2011

TUESDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 4 percent of U.S. hospitals offer the full range of support services that new mothers need to master breast-feeding, a new government report shows.

This is an important issue because breast-feeding protects against childhood obesity and offers other health benefits to children, according to the Vital Signs report released online Tuesday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Researchers analyzed data from CDC's national survey of Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care, and found that only 14 percent of hospitals have a written breast-feeding policy.

In nearly 80 percent of hospitals, healthy breast-feeding infants are given formula when it is not medically necessary. This practice makes it much more difficult for new mothers and infants to learn how to breast-feed and to continue breast-feeding at home.

Among the other findings:

  • Only one-third of hospitals practice "rooming in," in which mothers stay with their newborns 24 hours a day. This helps mothers and newborns learn to breast-feed by giving them frequent opportunities to breast-feed.
  • Nearly 75 percent of hospitals do not provide necessary breast-feeding support to mothers and babies when they leave the hospital. Required support includes a follow-up visit, a phone call from hospital staff and referrals to lactation consultants and breast-feeding support systems in the community.

The report's release coincides with World Breast-Feeding Week.

"Hospitals play a vital role in supporting a mother to be able to breast-feed," CDC director Dr. Thomas R. Frieden said in a CDC news release. "Those first few hours and days that a mom and her baby spend learning to breast-feed are critical. Hospitals need to better support breast-feeding, as this is one of the most important things a mother can do for her newborn. Breast-feeding helps babies grow up healthy and reduces health-care costs."

Low rates of breast-feeding in the United States result in $2.2 billion in additional medical costs per year. Babies who are fed formula and stop breast-feeding early have higher rates of obesity, diabetes, respiratory and ear infections. They also require more doctor visits, hospitalizations and prescriptions, according to the CDC.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Child Health & Human Development has more about breast-feeding.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, Aug. 2, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. New JNM research supports upcoming Alzheimers disease guidelines
2. UT Southwestern support groups book reaches out to husbands, partners of women battling cancer
3. PATH B -- a comprehensive support program for patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B
4. Americans Show Rising Support for Abortion Rights: Poll
5. ACR, SBI support updated ACOG recommendations that women begin annual mammograms at age 40
6. International AIDS Society to launch Virtual Media Centre in July to support opioid substitution therapy in Eastern Europe and Central Asia
7. NIH supports new research strategy for finding a cure for HIV
8. Covidien supports NOSCAR US multicenter human trial
9. Emergency departments need to do more to support older adults with cognitive impairment
10. Avastin Rejection Supported by Cancer Experts
11. PACS improves radiologists use of clinical decision support systems
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Support for Breast-Feeding Found Lacking in Many U.S. Hospitals
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 25, 2016 , ... Conventional wisdom preaches the benefits of moderation, whether it’s ... setting the bar too high can result in disappointment, perhaps even self-loathing. However, those ... goal. , Research from PsychTests.com reveals that behind the tendency to ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Marcy was in a crisis. Her son James, eight, was out ... family verbally and physically. , “When something upset him, he couldn’t control his emotions,” remembers ... would throw rocks at my other children and say he was going to kill them. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Comfort Keepers® of San ... Society and the Road To Recovery® program to drive cancer patients to and from ... adults to ensure the highest quality of life and ongoing independence. Getting to ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... New York, NY (PRWEB) , ... June 24, ... ... lifestyle publication Haute Living, is proud to recognize Dr. Barry M. Weintraub as ... believes that “the most beautiful women in the world, and the most handsome ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... Venture Construction Group (VCG) sponsors Luke’s Wings 5th Annual ... Country Club at 1201 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland, 20852. The event raised funds ... been wounded in battle and their families. Venture Construction Group is a 2016 Silver ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016 Research and ... Excipients Market by Type (Organic Chemical (Sugar, Petrochemical, Glycerin), ... Topical, Coating, Parenteral) - Global Forecast to 2021" ... The global pharmaceutical excipients market is projected ... CAGR of 6.1% in the forecast period 2016 to ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... DUBLIN , June 23, 2016 ... "Global MEMS Devices Medical Market Analysis 2016 - Forecast to ... The report contains up to date financial ... reliable analysis. Assessment of major trends with potential impact on ... dive analysis of market segmentation which comprises of sub markets, ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Bracket , a leading clinical trial ... clinical outcomes platform, Bracket eCOA (SM) 6.0, at the ... – 30, 2016 in Philadelphia , Pennsylvania.  ... Assessment product of its kind to fully integrate with RTSM, ... eCOA 6.0 is a flexible platform for electronic clinical outcomes ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: