Navigation Links
Super Bowl Stress Can Spark Heart Attacks
Date:2/5/2010

Investing too much emotion in the game can kill you, experts say,,

FRIDAY, Feb. 5 (HealthDay News) -- When the New Orleans Saints and the Indianapolis Colts take the field for Super Bowl XLIV on Sunday, emotions will be running high, so high that some fans can run the risk of a heart attack and even death.

The risk is real, cardiologists say, because studies have shown that when a favorite team loses, angry fans can suffer so much stress that the result is sudden cardiac death.

"If you look at a lot of data from a lot of different sports, there is a spectator risk," said Dr. Stephen Siegel, a cardiologist at New York University Langone Medical Center.

The best way to avoid this unhappy consequence is, "don't take it so seriously. Don't get so excited about it," he said. "Enjoy the game, have fun with it, but don't spend your life savings on betting on it and don't have your life invested in the outcome."

In one study, a team from the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, led by Dr. Robert Kloner, director of research at the Heart Institute at Good Samaritan Hospital, looked at death rates in Los Angeles County on the day of two Super Bowls that had decidedly different outcomes for the home team: 1980, when the Pittsburgh Steelers beat the Los Angeles Rams, and 1984, when the Los Angeles Raiders beat the Washington Redskins.

The researchers also looked at death rates for the two weeks following each game. They then compared those statistics to death rates in the same county for the same period in the years between and after those Super Bowls. They found that all-cause death rates rose significantly after the 1980 loss, and death rates declined after the 1984 victory.

"If you are a very enthusiastic fan that gets emotionally involved in these games and jumps up and down and screams and really feels the emotion, and especially if you have coronary risk factors like high blood pressure or diabetes, high cholesterol, smoking, they should discuss it with their health-care provider to maybe level that a little bit," Kloner said.

Kloner noted there are stress reduction programs and even some medications that can help keep you calm.

In another study, researchers looked at deaths during the 2006 World Cup soccer matches in which Germany played. During six of the seven German games, they found an increase in the number of reported cardiovascular events. That effect was even more pronounced when the Germans were involved in a dramatic match where the winning goal was scored during the last minute.

On days when the German team was playing, the proportion of cardiac patients who were male jumped to an average of 71.5 percent, while men only accounted for 56.7 percent of cardiac care during the no-play period.

Overall, the incidence of cardiac emergencies in men increased 3.26 times the average of the control period when the German team was playing. For women, the increase was 1.82 times higher than the control period.

Yet another study found that people with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) who let their anger get the better of them could be at high risk for sudden cardiac death from cardiac arrhythmia, an irregular heartbeats.

Siegel noted that eating too much and drinking too much can add to the stress, which, combined with anger, can also help trigger a heart attack.

Another expert, Dr. Gregg C. Fonarow, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles, said "the danger is real. Although uncommon, severe emotional stress can trigger cardiovascular events."

Some people may respond to the emotional stress of watching their favorite sports team lose an important game by releasing large amounts of catecholamines -- adrenalin and noradrenalin, also called epinephrine and norepinephrine -- into the bloodstream, along with other small proteins produced by an overexcited nervous system, Fonarow explained.

"These chemicals can trigger atherosclerotic plaques to rupture, resulting in an acute heart attack or can trigger life-threatening arrhythmias resulting in sudden cardiac death," he said. "Individuals with preexisting heart conditions and those with risk factors for heart disease are at increased risk for such events."

More information

For more information on your risk for a heart attack, visit the American Heart Association.



SOURCES: Stephen Siegel, M.D., cardiologist, New York University Langone Medical Center, and clinical assistant professor, New York University School of Medicine; Robert Kloner, M.D., Ph.D., director, research, Heart Institute, Good Samaritan Hospital, and professor, medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles; Gregg C. Fonarow, M.D., professor, cardiology, University of California, Los Angeles


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Top 10 Ways to Avoid a Heart Attack This Super Bowl
2. New Website Giving Away Diabetes-Friendly Super Bowl Munchies Recipes to Tackle America's Toughest Health Problem
3. Wounded Warrior Project and Operation Touchdown 2010 Join Forces for Super Bowl XLIV
4. Super Bowl XLIV - When it's Not Just About the Game
5. Purity Products Releases Their Next Generation Lycopene Omega-3 Super Formula
6. CallSource joins Starkey Hearing Foundation to Tackle Children's Hearing Loss in Super Bowl Mission
7. Super Bowl Advertising, In Good Times And Bad
8. Clean and green: Supermarket shelves awash in eco-friendly laundry detergents
9. A Nutty Super Bowl Snacks Strategy Helps Keep Diets in Play
10. Pre-season Super Bowl Song Becomes Dream Come True for New Orleans Own DEMBOYS
11. Vegetarian Saw Palmetto Extract Reformulated for Swanson Health Products' Superior Herbs Line
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/28/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... April 28, 2016 , ... ... which is has been collaborating with doctors and hospitals to make transformative changes ... the world’s leading cell therapy minds this week in discussing breakthroughs in cellular ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... ... reminds us that May is National Stroke Awareness Month. According to the Centers for ... the United States; someone has one every 40 seconds. Annually, almost 800,000 strokes occur ... A stroke is when blood flow to the brain is blocked or when a ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... Philadelphia, PA (PRWEB) , ... April 28, 2016 ... ... Barbara Browne, M.D. has been named a Top Doc in Physical Medicine and ... in conjunction with Castle Connolly Medical, Ltd. by randomly surveying physicians and medical ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... MO (PRWEB) , ... April 28, 2016 , ... Denise McCormick Baich had written poetry ... 2009 the poetry arrived again much like a tsunami and took on a more spiritual ... to her encouraged her to do more with it than just file it away. Friends ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... Prescription ... co-operative bankruptcy to receive their prescription medications through America’s fastest-growing pharmacy program. ... medications from over 180 American pharmaceutical companies for $35 per month, per ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/28/2016)... 28, 2016  ValGenesis, Inc., the market ... (VLMS) today announced that a prominent world ... of chronic kidney failure has selected ValGenesis ... corporate validation process. The global medical device ... to manage their validation processes electronically. Upon ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... April 27, 2016  Hologic, Inc. (Nasdaq: ... results for the fiscal second quarter ended March ... of $0.24 increased 41.2%, and non-GAAP diluted EPS ... increased 5.8% on a reported basis, and 6.3% ... "We posted another good quarter, highlighted by 14.6% ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... 27, 2016   ... in Recurring Consumable Sales  Clinical sales grow ... Technologies (Euronext: MKEA, OTCQX: MKEAY) inventor of Cellvizio®, the ... for the first quarter ended March 31, 2016 and ... of its commercial strategy. First Quarter 2016 ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: