Navigation Links
Sudden cardiac death in young athletes: Study suggests many ECG screenings are inaccurate
Date:7/13/2011

Cincinnati, OH, July 14, 2011 -- Incidents of young athletes collapsing during sports practice due to an undiagnosed heart condition are alarming, and have led some health care professionals to call for mandatory electrocardiogram (ECG) screenings before sport participation. Others, however, question the validity of such a mandate. A new study soon to be published in The Journal of Pediatrics examines the accuracy and effectiveness of pre-sport participation ECGs.

Dr. Allison Hill and colleagues from Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital and Pediatric Cardiology Associates conducted a survey to test the accuracy of ECG screenings. Fifty-three pediatric cardiologists were asked to interpret 18 ECGs, 8 from children with healthy hearts and 10 from children with heart conditions that could lead to sudden cardiac death. The accuracy of the cardiologists' interpretations was fairly low; the average score for overall accuracy was 67%. The cardiologists correctly restricted sport participation 81% of the time for children with heart conditions, and they correctly allowed participation 74% of the time for children with healthy hearts.

As Dr. Hill explains, "One problem with interpreting athletes' ECGs is that, as athletes' hearts grow stronger, they may get somewhat larger and beat more slowly. Although these changes are normal for a well-trained athlete, they can look similar on ECG scans to defects that predispose people to sudden cardiac death." As the test scores demonstrate, this similarity could lead to unnecessary exclusion of healthy young people from sport participation. And the reverse can also be true. According to Dr. Hill, "Some young athletes who are predisposed to sudden cardiac death may be given a clean bill of health based on a flawed ECG interpretation."

The researchers suggest that because ECGs are not always accurate and can be difficult to interpret, they may not be the perfect test for pre-screening athletes for heart conditions. "Although other countries have enacted laws mandating ECG screening for their athletes," Dr. Hill states, "the difficulty of interpreting ECG results, combined with the very large population of young athletes in the United States (over 10.7 million), may make such laws impractical." She and her colleagues suggest that, if young athletes are to be screened in this way, the physicians interpreting the ECG should be trained appropriately.


'/>"/>

Contact: Brigid Huey
journal.pediatrics@cchmc.org
513-636-7140
Elsevier Health Sciences
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Healthy Lifestyle May Ward Off Sudden Cardiac Death in Women
2. Study uncovers novel genetic variation linked to increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest
3. Sudden cardiac death subject of sweeping UCSF study in San Francisco
4. Breast-feeding May Shield Against Sudden Infant Death Syndrome
5. Gene Variant Linked to Sudden Cardiac Death Risk in Blacks
6. Genetic defects hold clues to risk for sudden cardiac death
7. Sudden Cardiac Death More Common in Young Athletes Than Thought
8. Young black athletes with sickle cell trait might be susceptible to sudden death
9. Researchers identify the genotype of disorders causing cardiac sudden death syndrome
10. Victor Chang scientists unlock the gates on sudden cardiac death
11. Sudden Infant Deaths Most Common on New Years
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 26, 2016 , ... ... they have been diagnosed with endometriosis. These women need a treatment plan to ... a comprehensive approach that can help for preservation of fertility and ultimately achieving ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... , ... First Choice Emergency Room , the largest network of independent ... Director of its new Mesquite-Samuell Farm facility. , “We are pleased to announce ... Dr. James M. Muzzarelli, Executive Medical Director of First Choice Emergency Room. , ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... A recent article published June ... with. The article goes on to state that individuals are now more comfortable seeking ... common operations such as calf and cheek reduction. The Los Angeles area medical group, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Global law firm Greenberg Traurig, P.A. announced ... attorneys chosen by their peers for this recognition are considered among the top 2 ... received special honors as members of this year’s Legal Elite Hall of Fame: ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 2016 , ... EB Medicine presented its first-ever “Issue of ... in Ponte Vedra Beach, FL. The awards honor the outstanding work of leading ... and Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice. , “With this award, we recognize the efforts ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... 24, 2016 Research and ... "Structural Electronics 2015-2025: Applications, Technologies, Forecasts" report ... In-Mold Electronics, Smart Skin, Structural Health Monitoring, ... Structural electronics involves electronic and/or electrical components ... replacing dumb structures such as vehicle bodies or ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... 2016 Research and Markets has announced ... Diagnostic Tests" report to their offering. ... The World Market for Companion Diagnostics covers ... Market analysis in the report includes the following: ... Diagnostic Kits) by Region (N. America, EU, ROW), 2015-2020 ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... 2016  Arkis BioSciences, a leading innovator in ... durable cerebrospinal fluid treatments, today announced it has ... is led by Innova Memphis, followed by Angel ... investors.  Arkis, new financing will accelerate the commercialization ... release of its in-licensed Endexo® technology. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: