Navigation Links
Study suggests that trouble sleeping leads to increased ratings of pain in cancer patients
Date:4/14/2009

Westchester, Ill. A study in the April 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine suggests that sleep problems lead to increased pain and fatigue in cancer patients. The results indicate that interventions aimed at trouble sleeping would be expected to improve both pain and fatigue in this patient population.

Results show that more than half the sample reported having trouble sleeping, with 26 percent reporting moderate or severe trouble sleeping. Compared with patients who reported no trouble sleeping, patients with moderate to severe trouble sleeping reported significantly more fatigue, pain and depressed mood. Using structural equation modeling analysis to evaluate causal relations and directions of effect, the best-fitting model indicates that trouble sleeping led to increased ratings of pain.

According to the authors, the relationship between pain and sleep often has been assumed to be reciprocal. In the present study, however, a model of reciprocal causation could not be fit to the data, and models in which pain caused trouble sleeping did not fit as well as the model in which trouble sleeping caused pain.

"We believed we would find a bi-directional relationship between insomnia and pain, but instead found that trouble sleeping was more likely a cause, rather than a consequence, of pain in patients with cancer," said lead author Edward J. Stepanski, chief operational officer at the Accelerated Community Oncology Research Network in Memphis, Tenn.

The study included demographic, clinical and patient-reported outcomes data from 11,445 cancer patients undergoing treatment at the West Clinic, a large community oncology practice in Memphis. Participants had an average age of 61.5 years, and 74 percent were female. Breast cancer was the most common form of cancer, and about 25 percent of study subjects had received chemotherapy in the last 30 days. Increases in depressed mood also led to increased ratings of pain.

Younger age and recent administration of chemotherapy were both associated with increased trouble sleeping. According to the authors, younger patients often receive more aggressive chemotherapy than older patients; therefore, younger patients may be exposed to more treatment-related toxicity.

Stepanski stated that several studies have shown that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) improves sleep in cancer patients who have insomnia. He believes that this type of intervention may decrease patients' pain and fatigue by improving their sleep.


'/>"/>

Contact: Kelly Wagner
kwagner@aasmnet.org
708-492-0930
American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Study Finds Discontinuation of Rosiglitazone Left Many Diabetes Patients Without Good Glycemic Control
2. Study reports success in treating a rare retinal disorder
3. Low Blood Sugar Events Increase Dementia Risk in Elderly Patients With Type 2 Diabetes, Kaiser Permanente Study Finds
4. Avoiding No Mans Land: New Deloitte Study on Follow-on Biologics Investigates Proposed Legislation and Possible Unintended Consequences
5. Impotence Drugs Dont Harm Vision: Study
6. Three Medical Centers Awarded Funds to Study Generation of Cardiac Muscle Cells
7. National Physicians Study: Nearly One Third Would Choose Different Career Today
8. Ex-White House Drug Czar McCaffrey, U.S. Congress Drug Caucus Chair Cummings, CRC Health CEO Karlin Join Hopkins Researchers at News Conference April 17 on Breakthrough Study: Internet Video Drug Treatment as Effective as Traditional Counseling
9. Study of neighborhoods points to modifiable factors, not race, in cancer disparities
10. New alternative to biopsy detects subtle changes in cancer cells, Stanford study shows
11. Study Challenges Link Between Panic Attacks, PTSD
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/2/2016)... , ... May 02, 2016 , ... As directed by ... of Pennsylvania (HAP) issues its full support to allow certified nurse practitioners (CNP) to ... after they have worked under such supervision for three years and 3,600 hours. , ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... May 02, 2016 , ... Eating Recovery Center’s ... eating, mood and anxiety disorders, has rebranded its eating disorder program under a new ... eating disorder treatment facility on May 16. , To celebrate, ERC Chicago will ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... May 02, 2016 , ... The National Resident ... Main Residency Match® (“the Match”), the system through which U.S. and international medical ... record-high 30,750 positions were placed in the 2016 Match, and 29,572 were filled ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... May 02, 2016 , ... East Los Angeles dentist , ... can visit Dr. Assili to receive any dental extraction treatment for $40 off the ... June 30, 2016. With the lower price, patients can more easily afford extractions to ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... May 02, 2016 , ... Zitter Health Insights ... Patient Satisfaction Award that will recognize specialty pharmacies for their achievements in customer ... Insights’ Specialty Pharmacy Patient Satisfaction Survey compiled throughout 2016. Results will be published ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/2/2016)...  While nearly three-quarters of Americans (71%) are aware ... health, only about half report taking any steps to ... a new survey announced today by Hologic (Nasdaq: ... Osteoporosis Month, Hologic is raising awareness of this major ... Americans. Osteoporosis is a disease that causes ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... 29, 2016 Acquisition Expands ... Product Development Capabilities in North America ... . Indegene ( http://www.indegene.com ), ... acquisition of Skura Corporation,s life science business. Skura,s ... sales enablement technology for life science organizations and ...
(Date:4/28/2016)...  While Abbott,s announced purchase of St. Jude ... and stent business, healthcare research firm Kalorama Information ... into patient monitoring.  Kalorama said that patient monitoring ... with double-digit growth expected the next 5 years, ... Patient Monitoring . Abbott Laboratories agreed to ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: