Navigation Links
Study suggests reduced lung function in infancy associated with wheeze later
Date:2/18/2013

A study in Australia suggests that reduced lung function in infancy was associated with wheezing beyond childhood at 18 years of age, according to a report published Online First by JAMA Pediatrics, a JAMA Network publication.

Abnormal airway function is characteristic of asthma and chronic obstructive airways disease, and other studies have suggested that reduced lung function is already apparent in childhood and tracks through adulthood. However, the relationship between the age of onset of airway dysfunction and wheeze, a symptom of obstructive airways disease, has not been clarified, the authors write in the study background.

The study by David Mullane, M.D., of University College Cork, Ireland, and colleagues included participants from a birth cohort who had been followed from one month to 18 years. At age 18 years, 150 participants were assessed and 37 participants (25 percent) had recent wheeze and 20 (13 percent) were diagnosed with asthma, according to the results.

"To our knowledge, this study is the first to report an association between reduced lung function in infancy and wheeze beyond childhood," the authors note.

In the study, a total of 143 participants were categorized as having persistent wheeze (n=13), later-onset wheeze (n=19), remittent wheeze (n=15) and no wheeze (n=96). Compared with the no-wheeze group, persistent wheeze was independently associated with reduced percentage of predicted maximal flow at functional residual capacity (V'maxFRC, mean reduction 43 percent). Compared with the no-wheeze group, persistent wheeze was also associated with atopy (a predisposition to allergic reactions) in infancy (odds ratio, 7.1); maternal asthma (odds ratio, 6.8) and active smoking (odds ratio, 4.8), according to the results.

"Unexpectedly, we observed that a reduced V'maxFRC at age one month was associated with increased risk for wheeze only in young adults who were also current smokers. These results suggest that reduced early airway function and later exposures such as smoking are important to the cause of obstructive respiratory diseases in young adults. Interventions aimed at preventing young children with asthma symptoms and reduced lung function from smoking might prevent persisting symptoms of obstructive airways disease," the authors comment. (JAMA Pediatr. Published online February 18, 2013. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.633. Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com.)

Editor's Note: This work was supported by the National Medical and Health Research Council of Australia. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Editorial: Neonatal Lung Function, Later Consequences

In a related editorial, Kai-Hkon Carlsen, M.D., Ph.D., of Oslo University Hospital, Norway, writes: "Mullane and colleagues present the results from an 18-year follow-up of a birth cohort recruited in Perth, Western Australia, during the late 1980s."

"The study by Mullane et al in the present issue of JAMA Pediatrics gives additional evidence to the finding that reduced lung function in early life has an important impact on later respiratory health. Taken together with the other studies cited, we may perhaps take away the message from the statement by Burrows and Taussig: 'As the twig is bent, the tree inclines.'"

(JAMA Pediatr. Published online February 18, 2013. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.119. Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com.)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.


'/>"/>
Contact: Steve W. Turner, M.D.
s.w.turner@abdn.ac.uk
JAMA and Archives Journals
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Doctors fail to communicate impact of heart devices with patients, SLU study finds
2. U.S. Plans Billion-Dollar Project to Study the Brain
3. Women at Greater Risk for Hip Implant Failure, Study Finds
4. New study on Hepatitis C drug treatment in vivo and in vitro
5. Smoggy Air Tied to Heart Attacks: Study
6. Proscar Wont Boost Prostate Cancer Survival, Study Finds
7. Bel Marra Health Reports on a New Study: Body Image Influences Psychosocial Activities and Quality of Life.
8. New Study Finds Eating More Colorful Produce May Prevent or Delay ALS, Underscores Value of Health Enhancement Systems Program Design
9. MRSA Super Bug Prevalent in Nursing Homes, Study Finds
10. Study finds possible link between diabetes and increased risk of heart attack death
11. Rich/Poor Divide Linked to Hospital Readmissions in Study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... March 29, 2017 , ... During the last week of March, Chad ... to eligible individuals in the local community. , Colon cancer is the second ... detect colon cancer while it is small, confined and easier to treat. If you ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... 29, 2017 , ... In the United States alone, up to 36% of ... types of metastatic brain tumors(3). Though most meningiomas are benign, metastatic brain tumors are ... more effective treatment options, the San Diego Gamma Knife Center offers a ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... March 29, 2017 , ... Full Contact ... founder of Pet Protect Law that assists dog owners in creating legally-enforceable ... new owners in taking the natural next step to protect their new companion. Says ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... March 30, 2017 , ... CHARM CITY RUN WELCOMES MERCY MEDICAL CENTER AS ... Medical Center will serve as the official title sponsor of the Baltimore Women’s Classic, ... 2017, thousands of women will walk or run the course around the Baltimore Inner ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... March 30, 2017 , ... Sublime Naturals ... "Spice of Life" or "Wonder Spice", it has been used for thousands of years. ... the East," says Heshelow, author of " Turmeric: How to Use it For Your ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/29/2017)... N.J. , March 29, 2017  Novartis ... Administration (FDA) has accepted the company,s Biologics License ... CTL019 (tisagenlecleucel-T), an investigational chimeric antigen receptor T ... pediatric and young adult patients with B-cell acute ... submission by Novartis for a CAR-T. The priority ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... -- The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund (GHIT Fund), ... infectious diseases around the globe, today announced 11 ... deliver a range of new innovative therapies for ... This latest round of targeted support includes funding ... pediatric formulation of a drug considered the gold ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... March 29, 2017 Optometrists have staunchly ... the highest standard in quality and care for ... its objective Wavefront-driven refraction technologies and process to ... enables an unprecedented level of refraction and correction ... relegated to Topgun Navy fighter pilots, but now ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: