Navigation Links
Study suggests new way to treat chronic pain
Date:3/26/2012

Nearly one in five people suffers from the insidious and often devastating problem of chronic pain.

That the problem persists, and is growing, is striking given the many breakthroughs in understanding the basic biology of pain over the past two decades. A major challenge for treating chronic pain is to understand why certain people develop pain while others, with apparently similar disorders or injuries, do not. An equally important challenge is to develop individualized therapies that will be effective in specific patient populations.

Research published online in Nature Medicine points to solutions to both challenges. A research team led by Prof. Jeffrey Mogil of McGill University in Montreal and Prof. Michael Salter of The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), affiliated with the University of Toronto, has identified a major gene affecting chronic pain sensitivity. The findings also suggest a new approach to individualizing treatment of chronic pain.

The gene that the researchers identified encodes the pain receptor known as P2X7. Specifically, the scientists discovered that a single amino-acid change in P2X7 controls sensitivity to the two main causes of chronic pain: inflammation and nerve damage.

The amino-acid change is known to affect only one function of P2X7 receptors the forming of pores that permit large molecules to pass through while leaving intact the other function, of allowing much tinier ions to flow through. Using a peptide that targets pore formation only, the researchers found that pain behaviours were dramatically reduced.

The scientists then examined genetic differences among human patients suffering from two distinct types of persistent pain: chronic post-mastectomy pain and osteoarthritis. In both cases, they found that individuals with genetically inherited low pore formation in P2X7 receptors experienced lower pain levels.

"Our findings indicate that it may be possible to develop drugs that block pores in this crucial receptor, while leaving its other function intact thereby killing pain while minimizing side effects," said Prof. Mogil, E.P. Taylor Professor of Pain Research in McGill's Department of Psychology.

Prof. Salter, Anne and Max Tanenbaum Chair in Molecular Medicine at SickKids, said these discoveries "point toward a new strategy for individualizing the treatment of chronic pain." Scientists from the U.S. and Israel also contributed to the study.


'/>"/>
Contact: Chris Chipello
christopher.chipello@mcgill.ca
514-398-4201
McGill University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Study: Low bone density medications may have protective effect on endometrial cancer
2. Parents of children with cancer distrust and fear online sources of health information, study shows
3. No evidence that higher regional health care costs indicate inappropriate care, study shows
4. Study Suggests Mental Fog of Menopause Is Real
5. Stem Cell Therapy Could Boost Kidney Transplant Success: Study
6. Vitamin E Supplements Dont Affect Heart Failure Risk: Study
7. Study shows colorectal cancer screening rates high in patients with multiple health problems
8. Some People More Prone to Drinking Blackouts: Study
9. Study Explains How Shock Therapy Might Ease Severe Depression
10. Less Heart Disease Among Women in Wealthier States: Study
11. Study to test new tinnitus treatment
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/20/2017)... FL (PRWEB) , ... January 20, 2017 , ... Source ... botanicals and 100 percent pure essential oils, announced the company had a successful visit ... , The annual ECRM event gives companies that work in the nutritional, sports and ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... January 20, 2017 , ... International Protein, a company based out of Australia ... attended the January ECRM trade show in Hilton Head, SC. , International Protein ... to create a line of products that would elevate her fitness regime. At this ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... January 20, 2017 , ... “The Angel”: a ... has set out for each of his children. “The Angel” is the creation of ... Music in New York City, and impassioned writer. , When asked of her new ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... , ... January 20, 2017 , ... “Journey to Christmas:” a beautiful and enchanting tale ... published author, Kimberly Cordoves, a mother of three in Oklahoma City, and a devoted woman ... of writing a book has been in the back of my mind for years, but ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... ... Management System: an On-demand E-learning system for Clinical and Regulatory education for ... is based on Aerolib`s successful education methodology of Disease Specific Documentation Improvement. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... LEXINGTON, Massachusetts , January 19, 2017 ... SHPG ) announced that the U.S. Food and Drug ... resubmission of a New Drug Application (NDA) for SHP465, ... being evaluated as a potential once-daily treatment for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity ... decision on or around June 20, 2017, the designated ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... BEACH, Florida , January 19, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... incoming Trump administration appears serious about reducing the ... advancements and innovation in the medical drug industry, ... forge ahead with new clinical trials and development ... Pharma companies forging ahead with recent developments include:  ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... -- The Global Therapy Partnering Terms and Agreements since ... and agreements entered into by the world,s leading healthcare ... deals by value - Deals listed by company A-Z, ... report provides understanding and access to the partnering deals ... companies. The report provides an analysis of partnering ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: