Navigation Links
Study suggests link between untreated depression and response to shingles vaccine
Date:2/13/2013

[EMBARGOED FOR FEB. 14, 2013] Results from a new study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases suggest a link between untreated depression in older adults and decreased effectiveness of the herpes zoster, or shingles, vaccine. Older adults are known to be at risk for shingles, a painful condition caused by the reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus, and more than a million new cases occur each year in the U.S. The vaccine boosts cell-mediated immunity to the virus and can decrease the incidence and severity of the condition.

In a two-year study, led by Michael Irwin, MD, at the University of California-Los Angeles, researchers measured the immune responses to shingles vaccination among 40 subjects aged 60 or older with a major depressive disorder and compared these responses to similar levels in 52 control patients matched by age and gender. Measurements were taken at baseline, and then 6 weeks, 1 year, and 2 years after the patients received the shingles vaccine or a placebo.

Depressed patients not being treated with antidepressants (selective serotonin uptake inhibitors) had lower cell-mediated immunity to the varicella-zoster virusand were less able to respond to the shingles vaccinecompared with patients who were not depressed or who were depressed but were receiving treatment with antidepressants, the researchers found.

The findings suggest that patients with untreated depression were "poorly protected by shingles vaccination," said Dr. Irwin. Depression treatment, on the other hand, boosted cell-mediated immunity and increased the effectiveness of the vaccine among those studied, even when the treatment did not lessen depression symptoms, the researchers found. Treating depression, noted Dr. Irwin, appeared to "normalize the immune response to the zoster vaccine" in the study.

Larger studies are needed to evaluate the possible relationship between untreated depression and the risk of shingles, the study authors noted, along with research to establish what mechanisms are responsible for patients' reduced immune response. The possible connection, however, is potentially significant: If antidepressants increase the efficacy of the shingles vaccine in those who are depressed, such treatment may have a similar effect on the immune response of depressed patients to other important vaccines, such those against influenza.

Diagnosis and treatment of depression in older adults may increase of the effectiveness of the shingles vaccine and help diminish the risk of shingles, the study authors conclude from their findings. "Efforts are also needed to identify and diagnose depressed elderly patients who might benefit from either a more potent vaccine or a multi-dose vaccination schedule," Dr. Irwin said.


'/>"/>
Contact: Jerica Pitts
jpitts@pcipr.com
312-558-1770
Infectious Diseases Society of America
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Queens study aims to use stem cells to help save sight of diabetes sufferers
2. Californias Tobacco Control Program generates huge health care savings, UCSF study shows
3. Vanderbilt study reveals clues to childhood respiratory virus
4. Outdoor Fast-Food Ads Linked to Obesity, Study Suggests
5. Key molecule suppresses growth of cancerous liver tumors, Mayo study finds
6. Cyberbullying as Harmful as Physical Threats, Study Finds
7. MIND Institute researchers receive $1 million grant to study cognitive training in fragile X
8. Study identifies factors associated with eradication of bacteria linked to gastric cancer
9. Study shows that problem-solving training helps mothers cope with childs cancer diagnosis
10. Startling Differences in New-Hip Estimates: Study
11. Womens Vitamin D Needs Dont Vary By Race, Study Finds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/19/2017)... ... 19, 2017 , ... "At your fingertips" electronic access to ... the Delaware Health Information Network (DHIN) have partnered to improve connectivity of this ... information exchange, DHIN stores and shares real-time health data for more than 2 ...
(Date:2/18/2017)... Waltham, Massachusetts (PRWEB) , ... February 17, 2017 ... ... be the leading source of disruptive innovation in the industry, according to the ... Insights Reports are based on surveys of the NEJM Catalyst Insights Council, a ...
(Date:2/18/2017)... ... February 17, 2017 , ... Park Cities Pet Sitter President, Joette White, has ... Life Radio network. The episode, which was posted this week, features a 30-minute ... led to Park Cities Pet Sitter’s being awarded the 2017 National Association of Professional ...
(Date:2/17/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... February 17, 2017 , ... Smiles by ... Shopping Center in Davidson, NC. Dr. Brian Seese leads the practice as a skilled ... services under one roof. Smiles by Seese serves patients of all ages with excellence ...
(Date:2/17/2017)... ... February 17, 2017 , ... Wells Pharmacy ... electronic prescribing of controlled and non-controlled substances plus the ability to manage orders ... the United States now accept electronic prescriptions, according to the Office of the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/17/2017)... , Feb. 17, 2017 Theravance ... Biopharma" or the "Company") today announced the presentation ... potent, and orally administered pan-Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor ... th Congress of the European Crohn,s and ... Company reported further data from its completed Phase ...
(Date:2/17/2017)... 17, 2017   Risperdal lawsuits involving gynecomastia (male ... with use of the atypical antipsychotic medication continue to ... Court of Common Pleas, where the state,s Risperdal docket ... to a notice posted on the Court,s website ... on March 9, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. (In Re: ...
(Date:2/17/2017)... YORK , Feb. 17, 2017  BioDigital, ... today the partnership of their 3D body mapping ... healthcare IT.  The new integration will be used ... an interactive model of the human body. BioDigital ... saves clinicians time, while also increasing the precision ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: