Navigation Links
Study suggests federal guidelines for treating teen PID need clarification
Date:4/9/2013

A Johns Hopkins Children's Center survey of 102 clinicians who treat teenage girls with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) has found that official guidelines designed to inform decisions about hospitalization versus outpatient care leave some clinicians scratching their heads.

The study, conducted by a team of adolescent medicine specialists and published online in the journal Sexually Transmitted Diseases, presented the clinicians with a series of common clinical scenarios and discovered a great deal of uncertainty among some trying to choose between inpatient and outpatient treatment for PID, a potentially damaging inflammation of the reproductive organs resulting from untreated, undertreated or recurrent sexually transmitted infections like chlamydia and gonorrhea, among others.

"The current guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leave a lot of room for interpretation and uncertainty, which can lead to considerable variability in treatment choice and outcomes from patient to patient," says study lead author Maria Trent, M.D., M.P.H., a pediatrician and teen health specialist at Johns Hopkins Children's Center.

Trent says that despite data showing that teens with PID often fail to adhere to outpatient treatment regimens and miss follow-up appointments, the CDC no longer recommends in-hospital treatment, although clinicians have the flexibility to hospitalize patients if they so choose.

However, the Johns Hopkins study findings suggest the guidelines fall short of informing that flexibility, particularly in cases that involve patients with recent abortions or whose social circumstances make it unlikely they would comply with the complex outpatient treatment, the researchers say. Such ambivalence was particularly common when the clinicians were uncertain about patients' ability to care for themselves, their willingness to take medications or about their willingness to share diagnoses with sexual partners.

Trent says the study revealed a gender and parental bias in decision-making. Male clinicians and non-parent clinicians were more likely than their female and parent colleagues to hospitalize patients, the study found.

"We found that some clinicians are simply uncomfortable sending a teen home and asking her to follow a complicated PID treatment regimen and return for follow-up visits, despite existing guidelines stating they should do just that," Trent says.

Designed properly, Trent adds, clinical guidelines should offer clear decision-making algorithms while giving physicians autonomy and flexibility. Lack of clarity, however, can force clinicians to make decisions predicated on personal bias rather than on evidence stemming from best practices, the investigators say.

In the study, the clinicians were presented with 17 clinical vignettes involving a hypothetical 15-year-old with PID, then asked to choose between hospital and outpatient treatment for each scenario. The clinicians had to weigh various factors, such as the patient's severity of illness and age, whether the patient was pregnant, whether the patient has had recent surgical procedures, whether the patient was afraid of sharing her diagnosis with a partner and whether the patient appeared able and willing to follow outpatient treatment regimen.

Each year, 800,000 girls and women in the United States develop PID, according to the CDC, and 10 percent of them develop infertility as a result. PID can lead to an array of other long-term problems including ectopic pregnancy and chronic pelvic pain, the researchers say.


'/>"/>

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
peshev1@jhmi.edu
410-502-9433
Johns Hopkins Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Study Suggests Vaccine May Help Kids With Brain Cancer
2. Study reveals how cancer drug causes diabetic-like state
3. Coffee Drinking in Pregnancy Wont Lead to Sleepless Baby: Study
4. Lower GI problems plague many with rheumatoid arthritis, Mayo Clinic study finds
5. Veggies Like Broccoli, Cabbage May Help Fight Breast Cancer: Study
6. No Added Cancer Risk From Hip Replacement Materials: Study
7. Reported Decline in U.S. Pneumonia Deaths May Be False: Study
8. Early Study Finds Some Promise for Lung Cancer Vaccine
9. Narcissists Often Ace Job Interviews, Study Finds
10. Sexual objectification of female artists in music videos exists regardless of race, MU study finds
11. Soy may alleviate hot flashes in menopause, large-scale study finds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/26/2016)... Orion, Clarkston, Michigan (PRWEB) , ... June 26, ... ... with respect to fertility once they have been diagnosed with endometriosis. These women ... intercourse but they also require a comprehensive approach that can help for preservation ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Austin residents seeking Mohs ... College of Mohs Surgery and to Dr. Russell Peckham for medical and surgical dermatology. ... treatment for skin cancer. The selective fellowship in Mohs Micrographic Surgery completed by Dr. ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... "With 30 hand-drawn hand gesture ... said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , ProHand Cartoon’s package ... Final Cut Pro X . Simply select a ProHand generator and drag it ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... As a lifelong Southern Californian, ... and his M.D from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He trained ... Angeles to complete his fellowship in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai program where ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 2016 , ... On Friday, June 10, Van Mitchell, Secretary of the Maryland ... iHire in recognition of their exemplary accomplishments in worksite health promotion. , The Wellness ... & Wellness Symposium at the BWI Marriott in Linthicum Heights. iHire was one of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016  In a startling report released today, ... residents by lacking a comprehensive, proven plan to eliminate prescription opioid ... ranking of how states are tackling the worst drug crisis in ... states – Kentucky , New Mexico ... . Of the 28 failing states, three – ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 Research ... MEMS Devices Medical Market Analysis 2016 - Forecast to 2022" ... The report contains up to date financial data ... analysis. Assessment of major trends with potential impact on the ... analysis of market segmentation which comprises of sub markets, regional ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of ... their offering. The current ... environment for MedImmune to enter. The US ageing population creates ... drive considerable growth for effective anti-influenza medications. The introduction of ... but development is still in its infancy. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: