Navigation Links
Study shows tranquil scenes have positive impact on brain
Date:9/14/2010

Tranquil living environments can positively affect the human brain function, according to researchers at the University of Sheffield.

The research, which was published in the journal NeuroImage, uses functional brain imaging to assess how the environment impacts upon our brain functions.

The findings demonstrated that tranquil environmental scenes containing natural features, such as the sea, cause distinct brain areas to become 'connected' with one another whilst man-made environments, such as motorways, disrupt the brain connections.

The research involved academics from the University's Academic Unit of Clinical Psychiatry, Academic Radiology and the School of Architecture, along with the School of Engineering, Design and Technology at the University of Bradford and the Institute of Medicine and Neuroscience at Jlich, Germany. The team carried out functional brain scanning at the University of Sheffield to examine brain activity when people were presented with images of tranquil beach scenes and non-tranquil motorway scenes.

They utilised the fact that waves breaking on a beach and traffic moving on a motorway produce a similar sound, perceived as a constant roar, and presented the participants with images of tranquil beach scenes and non-tranquil motorway scenes while they listened to the same sound associated with both scenes.

Using brain scanning that measures brain activity they showed that the natural, tranquil scenes caused different brain areas to become 'connected' with one another indicating that these brain regions were working in sync. However, the non-tranquil motorway scenes disrupted connections within the brain.

Dr Michael Hunter, from the Sheffield Cognition and Neuroimaging Laboratory (SCANLab) based in Academic Clinical Psychiatry within the University of Sheffield's Department of Neuroscience, said: "People experience tranquillity as a state of calmness and reflection, which is restorative compared with the stressful effects of sustained attention in day-to-day life. It is well known that natural environments induce feelings of tranquillity whereas manmade, urban environments are experienced as non-tranquil. We wanted to understand how the brain works when it perceives natural environments, so we can measure its experience of tranquillity."

Professor Peter Woodruff, from SCANLab, said: "This work may have implications for the design of more tranquil public spaces and buildings, including hospitals, because it provides a way of measuring the impact of environmental and architectural features on people's psychological state. The project was a real collaborative effort, bringing together researchers from Psychiatry, Radiology and Architecture at the University of Sheffield, as well as Engineering at the University of Bradford and the Institute of Medicine and Neuroscience at Jlich, Germany."


'/>"/>

Contact: Lauren Anderson
l.h.anderson@sheffield.ac.uk
01-142-221-046
University of Sheffield
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Fast-Freeze May Help Sperm Survive Storage, Study Finds
2. Study identifies underlying dysfunction of seemingly non-critical heart condition
3. Blacks with muscular dystrophy die 10-12 years younger than whites: New study
4. New study: Serious gaps in medical journals disclosure of physician relationships with industry
5. CU-Boulder study sheds light on how our brains get tripped up when were anxious
6. New study reconciles conflicting data on mental aging
7. National study finds 70 percent increase in basketball-related traumatic brain injuries
8. Henry Ford Hospital study: hVISA linked to high mortality
9. Study finds the effects of population aging have been exaggerated
10. Study finds most Oregon hospices do not fully participate in the Death with Dignity Act
11. VCU Medical Center leads study of first US portable driver for powering the total artificial heart
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Cabot Corporation, Pfizer, and ... according to court documents and SEC filings. A jury has returned a ... American Optical Corporation, Case No. BC588866, Los Angeles County, California. The jury awarded ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... ... in intellectual property (IP) to its specialty academic programs. , Answering to the ... college’s existing certificate programs in health law, and environmental and land use law. ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... On Memorial Day, Hope For Heroes ... in military battle for the country. The nonprofit Hope For Heroes partnered with ... that empower independence for disabled military veterans, as well as police, firemen, and EMS ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Cardiac arrhythmia is a common complication following ... survival, reports a team of UPMC researchers in the largest study of its ... Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, provide critical information that will hopefully lead to better ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... , ... May 26, 2016 , ... MadgeTech will be ... engineered, and manufactured in Warner, New Hampshire at the MadgeTech headquarters. With products sold ... monitoring solutions trusted by government agencies, including NASA. , In 2012, NASA strategically ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/24/2016)... Cirujanos holandeses han puesto en ... médicos a compartir sus mejores prácticas por el mundo ... médicos de Europa, África, Asia ... aplicación, que combina la transmisión en vivo con mensajería ... Educación   "Imagine un médico de Medicines ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... 24, 2016   , ... in overall bowel cleansing and superiority in ... leansing of the ascending ... , Norgine B.V. today announced new positive data from ... ascorbate bowel preparation) versus standard 2 litre PEG with ascorbate. The ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... -- ARANZ Medical  Ltd a specialist in ... been named the Coretex Hi-Tech Emerging Company of the Year ... Bruce Davey , CEO of ARANZ Medical says, "This ... to be recognised for the work we are doing to ... 35 countries around the world from Sub-Saharan Africa through to ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: