Navigation Links
Study shows reducing class size may be more cost-effective than most medical interventions
Date:10/16/2007

October 16, 2007 -- Reducing the number of students per classroom in U.S. primary schools may be more cost-effective than most public health and medical interventions, according to a study by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the Virginia Commonwealth University. The study indicates that class-size reductions would generate more quality-adjusted life-year gains per dollar invested than the majority of medical interventions. The findings will be published in the November issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

The researchers estimated the health and economic effects of reducing class sizes from 2225 students to 1317 students in kindergarten through grade 3 nationwide, based on an intervention tested in Project STAR (Student Teacher Achievement Ratio), a large multi-school randomized trial that began in 1985. Project STAR is considered the highest quality long-term experiment to date in the field of education.

The study shows that a student graduating from high school after attending smaller-sized classes gains an average of 1.7 quality-adjusted life-years and generates a net $168,431 in lifetime revenue. Higher earnings and better job quality enhance access to health insurance coverage, reduce exposure to hazardous work conditions, and provide individuals and families with the necessary resources to move out of unfavorable neighborhoods and to purchase goods and services, says Peter A. Muennig, MD, MPH, assistant professor of Health Policy and Management at the Mailman School. Regardless of class size, the net effect of graduating from high school is roughly equivalent to taking 20 years of bad health off of your life."

When targeted to low-income students, the estimated savings would increase to $196,000 per additional graduate. This is because low-income students seem to benefit more from the additional attention afforded by small classes, noted Dr. Muennig. Because we focused on a relatively expensive intervention and examined outcomes over a range of values, our results should provide a conservative framework for evaluating this and other interventions as long-term data on educational interventions become more plentiful, he commented.

The performance of students in the U.S. has been declining relative to the performance of students in other countries. With health costs soaring and student performance falling, the United States is in jeopardy of losing its economic dominance.

The findings not only raise issues of whether investments in social determinants of health can be more cost-effective than investments in conventional medical care, but more intriguing still, also bring up the idea that each dollar invested in education could also potentially produce other long-term returns, observes Dr. Muennig. He notes that further analysis will refine models and produce more-precise estimates, but these findings do point to the importance of looking more broadly at the options available for improving health outcomesincluding those outside the boundaries of clinical medicine.


'/>"/>

Contact: stephanie berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Rural Canadians travel far for specialists: study
2. A new study surpasses Gene Therapy Hurdle
3. Tomato Sauce reduces Cancer Risk- Study
4. A question on study of Adult Stem Cell
5. Study on obesity and heart failure
6. National Lung Study in the process
7. Marijuana gateway theory strengthened by study of twins
8. Old theory of adaptation confirmed by new study
9. Study casts doubt on keyboard ills
10. Gene study links endometriosis, infertility
11. Study reveals how stress can make you sick
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/8/2016)... , ... February 08, 2016 , ... Delta Dental of ... help combat pancreatic cancer. , Gary D. Radine, who recently retired as president and ... American Cancer Society’s 2015 CEO of the Year , helped lead the effort ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... Discover the Rocky Mountain region’s longest ... and 700 companies. Attendees also get to see the most incredible gardens and ... Home Show , at the Colorado Convention Center - 700 14th St. Denver CO, ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... Guruji Mahendra Kumar Trivedi is offering ... 2016 in honor of his birthday on February 10th. During this time, people ... is known by over 250,000 people from over 40 different countries as an “ordinary ...
(Date:2/7/2016)... ... February 07, 2016 , ... ... empowers employers and organizations with the tools and information to lower the costs, ... to cut the cost of providing employee healthcare benefits by as much as ...
(Date:2/6/2016)... ... ... Shark Finds and Kevin Harrington, along with the Product Managers ... Belly Bands. , Having a dog is great—except when it wets every couch, bed, ... works, get Belly Bands, the easiest way to stop dogs from wetting on ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/8/2016)... -- Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. (Nasdaq: NBIX ) announced today ... year-end 2015 results after the Nasdaq market closes on ... live conference call and webcast to discuss its financial ... 11, 2016 at 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time (1:30 p.m. ... http://www.neurocrine.com . --> Participants can access the ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... 8, 2016 --> ... report "Ablation Technologies Market by Product (Radiofrequency, Ultrasound, Irreversible ... Cosmetic Surgery, Ophthalmology, Gynecology) - Global Forecasts to 2020", ... over the forecast period of 2015 to 2020. The ... at CAGR of 10.5% from 2015 to 2020. ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... 8, 2016 Nueterra, the nation,s ... in the development of equity partnerships and ... has divided its interests between two new ... will continue the founding company,s private equity ... a national system of integrated provider networks ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: