Navigation Links
Study shows lead-based paint problem isn't isolated to China
Date:9/27/2007

CINCINNATIA multinational team of environmental and occupational health researchers has found that consumer paints sold in Nigeria contain dangerously high levels of lead.

Increased globalization and outsourcing of manufacturing has drastically increased the likelihood that products with unacceptably high levels of lead are being traded across bordersincluding between China and Africa as well as into regulated countries like the United States.

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) and University of Ibadan in Nigeria report these findings in an early Sept. 12 online edition of the journal Science of the Total Environment. Researchers believe the studyto be published in the December print issue of the journalis the first report of new consumer paint lead levels in Africa.

Nigerias recent economic recovery may lead to increased activity in the building industry and Nigerialike other African countriesis increasing trade with Asia, particularly in China, explains Eugenious Adebamowo, of the University of Ibadan and lead author of the study.

Its important that international regulations be in place to supplement local efforts to ensure that paints have lower than recommended lead levels, with the ultimate goal of eventually eliminating all lead from paint, she adds.

For this study, researchers analyzed lead levels in five colors of paint, from each of five brands, marketed and sold in Ibadan, a city of more than 2 million people in southwestern Nigeria. Each paint sample was applied in a single layer to a wood block, left to dry and then removed and analyzed in UC laboratories for lead content.

They found that 96 percent of the consumer paints available in Nigeria contained higher than the recommended levels of lead. Bright-colored paintsparticularly yellow, red, and green contained the highest levels. Respectively, lead levels in yellow, red and green paint were 10, six and three times higher when compared with basic white paint

The extent of domestic lead exposure, and its resulting health hazards has been understudied in developing countries, though its importance in cognitive dysfunction related to early exposure is well established in countries such as the United States, says Scott Clark, PhD, professor of environmental health at UC and study collaborator.

Researchers compared the Nigerian paint samples with those sold in some Asian countries, using data obtained by Clark and his collaborators in previous studies. In the September 2006 issue of the journal Environmental Research, Clark reported that more than 75 percent of consumer paint tested from countries without lead-content controlsincluding India, Malaysia and Chinahad levels exceeding U.S. regulations. Collectively, these countries represent more than 2.5 billion people.

Although the median lead levels on Nigerian consumer-based paints did not substantially differ from those in Asian countries, nearly all still exceeded U.S. safety guidelines.

Sandy Roda, a study coauthor who oversaw sample analysis, stressed the international nature of the problem. She noted that one paint manufacturer in Nigeria sold high-lead paint in India, but offered a low-lead version in Singapore, a country that enforces a lead standard similar to the United States.

Its very likely that many existing Nigerian homes contain dangerously high levels of lead, so its absolutely critical from a health standpoint that immediate efforts be made to assess the presence of lead in homes, adds Clark. Lead is a malleable metal previously used to improve the durability and color luster of paint applied in homes and on industrial structures such as bridges. Now scientifically linked to impaired intellectual and physical growth in children, lead is also found in some commonly imported consumer products, including candy, folk and traditional medications, ceramic dinnerware and metallic and wooden toys and trinkets. Researchers say exposure to environmental health hazards is a continuing concern in developing countries, where the United Nations has identified lead as a primary problem.

When it comes to public awareness of lead and its detrimental health effects, Nigeria and many other large, developing countries are 25 years behind, says Clement Adebamowo, corresponding author of the study. Intervention programs could eliminate the risk for exposure and improve the overall health of the Nigerian people.

Training and research programs to increase public and professional awareness of lead exposure are being developed at the University of Ibadan in collaboration with other centers in Nigeria.

Previous studies conducted by Jos University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria and several international collaborators have shown that 70 percent of children, aged 6 to 35 months, had elevated blood-lead levels and that flaking house paint was a primary determinant of this exposure.

Recent massive recalls of toys from China for lead-based paint content offer further evidence of the public health threat lead-based paint marketing in foreign countries can pose in the United States, adds Clark. A consistent, global ban against lead-based paint is urgently needed to protect people not just in the United Statesbut across the world.


'/>"/>

Contact: Amanda Harper
amanda.harper@uc.edu
513-558-4657
University of Cincinnati
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Rural Canadians travel far for specialists: study
2. A new study surpasses Gene Therapy Hurdle
3. Tomato Sauce reduces Cancer Risk- Study
4. A question on study of Adult Stem Cell
5. Study on obesity and heart failure
6. National Lung Study in the process
7. Marijuana gateway theory strengthened by study of twins
8. Old theory of adaptation confirmed by new study
9. Study casts doubt on keyboard ills
10. Gene study links endometriosis, infertility
11. Study reveals how stress can make you sick
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:7/25/2017)... OK (PRWEB) , ... July 25, 2017 , ... ... proud to announce the launch of their partnership to provide the Pharmacist ... the first pharmacy-focused platform in the country with the ability to develop the ...
(Date:7/25/2017)... ... July 25, 2017 , ... Therachat ... will be exhibiting and providing demos of its smart journaling platform at the ... Center in Washington D.C. from August 3-6, 2017. , The APA Annual Convention ...
(Date:7/25/2017)... , ... July 25, 2017 , ... ... ATM provider in the United States, today announced its partnership with financial technology ... , The foundation of the solution lies within Hyosung’s superior ATMs, assisted ...
(Date:7/25/2017)... Jacksonville, Fla. (PRWEB) , ... July 25, 2017 , ... ... employee and father Ezra Clark is taking advantage of a new benefit for employees ... “It really means a lot that the company supports me and other employees as ...
(Date:7/25/2017)... TX (PRWEB) , ... July 25, 2017 , ... SignatureCare ... emergencies in the Austin, TX area 24 Hours a day. , The ... Austin, TX. , “We’ve been open four months now and things are running ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:7/25/2017)... and CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts , July 25, 2017 ... repurposing drugs to treat rare nervous system diseases, has concluded ... develop and market the drug SOM0226 against transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR). ... very promising results in a Phase 2 study conducted in ... office in the United States ...
(Date:7/24/2017)... July 24, 2017 IBM (NYSE: IBM ) ... Quadrant for Solid-State Arrays (SSA) for the fourth year in ... According to Gartner, "Vendors in the Leaders quadrant have the ... Vision. A vendor in the Leaders quadrant has the market ... the acceptance of new technologies. These vendors demonstrate a clear ...
(Date:7/21/2017)... EDMONTON, Alberta , July 21, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada ... partner journal, Schizophrenia 1 , demonstrating that AI ... schizophrenia with 74% accuracy. This retrospective analysis also ... symptoms in schizophrenia patients with significant correlation, based ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: