Navigation Links
Study reveals causes of survival disparities based on insurance among rectal cancer patients

Disparities in cancer stage and treatment are the main reasons why Medicaid-insured and uninsured rectal cancer patients are twice as likely to die within five years as privately insured patients. That is the conclusion of a new study published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. Because poorer survival among rectal cancer patients without private insurance is largely attributable to later cancer stage at diagnosis and inadequate treatment, disparities may be lessened through health care reform.

A number of factors may account for survival disparities seen among patients with colorectal cancer. The likelihood that these patients might die prematurely may be influenced by cancer stage and treatment, health insurance status, and demographic factors such as age, sex, race/ethnicity, and poverty status. To explore the relative contribution of such factors on survival disparities, Anthony S. Robbins, MD, PhD, of the American Cancer Society in Atlanta and his colleagues conducted a study of insurance status and survival among 19,154 rectal cancer patients aged 18 to 64 years, using data from the National Cancer Data Base, a national hospital-based cancer registry. Patients were diagnosed in 1998 to 2002 and were followed through 2007. (The investigators restricted the study to rectal cancer rather than all colorectal cancer because it is staged and treated differently than colon cancer, and previous research on rectal cancer is more limited than research on colon cancer.)

Dr. Robbins and his team examined the impact of 10 factors on 5-year survival: age, sex, race/ethnicity, cancer grade, cancer subtype, neighborhood education and income levels, treatment facility type, cancer stage, and treatment. After adjusting only for age, the researchers found that Medicaid-insured and uninsured patients had twice the risk of privately insured patients of dying within five years. After adjusting for all of the factors listed above, the investigators determined that rectal cancer patients insured through Medicaid had a 34 percent increased risk of dying within five years compared with privately insured patients. Uninsured patients had a 29 percent increased risk of dying within five years compared with privately insured patients. Disparities in cancer stage and treatment accounted for approximately 53 percent of the excess deaths, while factors other than stage and treatment accounted for approximately 17 percent.

"Our main finding, that most of the excess mortality seen among uninsured and Medicaid-insured patients was explained by two modifiable factors (stage and treatment) suggests that improving insurance coverage and reducing cost-related barriers to primary care, colorectal cancer screening, and high-quality treatment would have a major impact on colorectal cancer survival disparities," said Dr. Robbins.


Contact: David Sampson
American Cancer Society

Related medicine news :

1. Casual Sex Doesnt Cause Emotional Damage: Study
2. Study Finds Possible Explanation for the Link Between Infertility and Breast/Ovarian Cancer Risks
3. Screening for Spinal Muscular Atrophy Not Cost-Effective: Study
4. New study finds possible source of beta cell destruction that leads to Type 1 diabetes
5. New Study Demonstrates Novel Use of Metabolic Imaging to Locate Sperm in Infertile Men -- Non-Invasive Imaging Procedure May Replace Invasive Techniques such as Testicula
6. Risk of stroke lower for recent Ontario immigrants: study
7. Definitive study confirms chemo benefit in postmenopausal breast cancer
8. Experimental stem cell treatment arrests acute lung injury in mice, study shows
9. Violence is part of the job say nurses as study shows only 1 in 6 incidents are reported
10. Controversial Autism Study Retracted by Medical Journal
11. Study Reveals Impact Of Health Insurance On Hispanics' Attitudes Towards Healthcare Providers
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... Consistent with the ... 2016 Building Better Radiology Marketing Programs meeting will showcase some of ... 6, 2016, at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas with a pre-conference session on ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... The moment you stop ... not only fulfilling the needs of advisers and clients but going above and ... providing top-tier customer service. However, there's always room for improvement, which is why ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... the largest, most successful and prominent nonprofit healthcare organizations in the country. They ... involvement with various organizations, and helped advance the healthcare industry as a whole ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Indosoft Inc., developer and distributor of the ... LTS (Long Term Support) into its Q-Suite 5.10 product line. , Making the ... a version of Asterisk that will receive not only security fixes, but feature ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... CognisantMD ... for diagnostic imaging in the Waterloo region. Using the Ocean Platform, family physicians ... directly from their electronic medical record (EMR) without the need for redundant patient ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... , November 27, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... --> Medical ... response system (PERS) market is ... 5 years with APAC being ... to see a high CAGR ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... -- --> --> Juntendo ... optimal contrast weighting of MRI for patients with Multiple ... research agreement with SyntheticMR in order to use SyMRI in ... possible to generate multiple contrast images from a single scan ... thus making it possible to both fine tune images and ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... DUBLIN , November 26, 2015 ... has announced the addition of the  ... in the Global Cell Surface Testing ... Opportunities" report to their offering.  ... the addition of the  "2016 Future ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: