Navigation Links
Study reports racial disparities in pediatric appendicitis treatment tied to hospital type
Date:12/28/2012

CHICAGO (December 28, 2012): When researchers from UCLA Medical Center investigated the link between racial disparities and appendicitis outcomes in children, they found that the type of hospital in which black, Hispanic and other minority patients receive carecommunity, children's or countyaffects their odds of developing a perforated appendix. The study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons is a first-of-its-kind look at the role hospital type plays in race-based treatment variances among this patient subset.

Appendicitisa painful, inflamed appendixis the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery in children. Approximately 80,000 pediatric cases are diagnosed in the U.S. annually.* Since the inflamed appendix can sometimes become perforated if the condition is not treated in a timely fashion (usually one to two days from the time symptoms first appear), researchers have used appendix perforation as a marker for inadequate access to health care. While existing research shows that a number of factors (such as age, socioeconomic status, the distance a family lives from a hospital) increase the risk for developing a perforated appendix in minorities, these factors don't tell the whole story.

"Appendicitis is a time-dependent disease process that leads to more a complicated medical outcome, and that outcome, perforated appendicitis, has increased hospital costs and increased burden to both the patient and society," according to study author Stephen Shew, MD, FACS, associate professor of surgery, UCLA Medical Center, and a pediatric surgeon at Mattel Children's hospital, both in Los Angeles.

To determine whether there is a link between hospital type and racial disparities, as measured by appendiceal perforation (AP), Dr. Shew and colleagues looked at data from the California Patient Discharge Dataset. Their analysis involved 107,727 children between the ages of two and 18 years old who were treated for appendicitis at 386 California hospitals between 1999 and 2007. Of these children, 53 percent were Hispanic, 36 percent were white, 3 percent were black, 5 percent were Asian, and 8 percent were of an unknown race. The children were sorted by hospital type, which included community, children's and county hospitals.

After accounting for age, income level and other known factors that increase risk for a perforated appendix, researchers found that at community hospitals, Hispanic children were 23 percent more likely to experience appendix perforation than white children, and Asian children were 34 percent more likely than white children to experience appendix perforation. Further, Hispanic patients treated at children's hospitals were 18 percent more likely to develop this complication than white patients. Odds of appendix perforation did not differ by race within county hospitals. Researchers also found that black patients treated at children's and county hospitals had a higher risk of appendix perforation compared with black patients treated at community hospitals.

Beyond what the researchers already know about appendicitis outcomes in children, these findings indicate that hospital type does play an independent role in risk for perforated appendicitis, and that these disparities in appendicitis outcomes exist at different types of hospitals based upon race, Dr. Shew said. "The goal is to figure out why these racial disparities exist and what interventions could be put in place to help eliminate them," he added.

Dr. Shew stressed that further research is still needed on a variety of issues, including whether there is a link between language barriers and understanding symptoms of appendicitis and access to care. "We don't know what explains these findings; however we suspect that there are some other barriers in play," Dr. Shew said. This discovery shows that a critical piece of the puzzlewhat is happening with the child and the parents from the time they first discover the symptoms of appendicitis to the time they seek careis still missing.

"As investigators it behooves us to look further into prehospital factors that may contribute to this racial disparity and ultimately find what interventions can be implemented to provide much quicker access to care, so children can get treated more effectively," Dr. Shew said. "But we don't know for sure what would be most beneficial until we really know where the problem lies."


'/>"/>

Contact: Sally Garneski
pressinquiry@facs.org
312-202-5409
American College of Surgeons
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Strange behavior: New study exposes living cells to synthetic protein
2. Vanderbilt study examines Affordable Care Acts impact on uncompensated care
3. Cancer-Related Fatigue Often Overlooked, Study Finds
4. Fibromyalgia Diagnosis Often Missed in Men: Study
5. Males Struck by Cars Die More Often Than Females: Study
6. U.S. Cancer Screening Rates Dropping: Study
7. Ability to metabolize tamoxifen affects breast cancer outcomes, Mayo Clinic-led study confirms
8. US cancer screening rates decline over the last 10 years, finds new study
9. Lifestyle Affects Outcome of Peripheral Artery Procedure: Study
10. Atlanta Surgeon for LASIK Eye Surgery Publishes Study on Website About Car Technology to Monitor Drowsiness
11. Autopsy-based study examines prevalence of atherosclerosis among US service members
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/2/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... December 02, 2016 , ... On Dec. ... the Hard Rock Hotel San Diego honoring the 2016 MPN Heroes—eight individuals who have ... (MPNs) by going above and beyond the standard of care, demonstrating leadership within the ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... ... Advanced Inc., a leading provider of travel therapy and travel nursing across ... Advanced Inc.’s Chief Financial Officer, effective December 1, 2016. Jason previously served as Vice ... leadership experience to Advanced Inc. He began his career in finance at Ernst & ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... Raleigh, NC (PRWEB) , ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... the Open Enrollment Period (or Annual Election Period), is ending December 7th. Currently-enrolled Medicare ... plan (Part C) or prescription drug plan (Part D) need to make changes during ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... , ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... interview of two ostomy patients, standing as living proof that attitude and determination ... digestive diseases and issues that spike around the holidays. This campaign will offer ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... Health" in USA Today, which covers the innovative treatments, therapeutic technologies, and revolutionized ... fulfilling lives. “We are prolonging life 6 years in the last 3 decades,” ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/2/2016)... 2016 According to a ... by Product (Instruments, Reagents, Software), Technology (Immunoassay, Clinical ... Nephrology, Infectious Diseases) - Forecast to 2021" published ... USD 60.22 Billion in 2016. This market is ... during the forecast period (2016-2021) to reach USD ...
(Date:12/2/2016)...  The Addiction Treatment Advisory Group (ATAG), created ... Pharmacy (AMCP), has released detailed findings on how ... addiction crisis, including through improved access to naloxone ... newly released paper, "The Role of Managed Care ... issues around gaps and barriers to addiction treatment ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... -- Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: BSX ) ... assets and capabilities of the Neovasc, Inc., (NASDAQ: ... as well as a 15% equity stake in Neovasc, ... Neovasc advanced biological tissue business makes elements used in ... System. * Upon completion of the transaction, the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: