Navigation Links
Study points to possibility of blood test to detect lung cancer

DURHAM, N.C. -- A test for four blood proteins may provide a less-invasive follow-up for patients who have suspicious lesions on chest radiographs or computerized tomography (CT) scans, according to a new study led by Duke University Medical Center researchers.

CT scans have a very high false positive rate when trying to discover lung cancer, said Edward Patz, Jr., M.D., a radiologist at Duke and lead investigator on the study. What that leads to is several follow-up imaging studies or invasive procedures like biopsy, which have risks of their own. This study is the first step in developing a test that would allow us to sample a patients blood and determine whether more invasive testing and treatment are necessary.

The researchers published their findings in the December 10, 2007 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The study was funded by Dukes Department of Radiology.

Researchers studied four proteins in the blood and found that their levels were different in patients with lung cancer as compared to patients of the same age and gender who didnt have cancer. They compared the levels of these proteins in the blood of almost 100 patients known to have lung cancer to the levels in the blood of nearly 100 patients without cancer.

Using the four markers, known as CEA, RBP, SCC and AAT, we were able to distinguish patients who had cancer from those who didnt with over 80 percent accuracy, Patz said.

The four protein markers have all been associated with lung cancer, but none in isolation wields enough influence to definitively indicate the disease. However, in combination they may be very useful, Patz said.

The researchers created a "classification tree" to sort out a person's likelihood of having lung cancer, based on the levels of each of the four proteins. People whose samples landed in one of three bins at the bottom of the tree had a 90 percent chance of having cancer, Patz said. Other bins indicated risks as low as 10 percent.

CT scanning has been proposed for routine lung cancer screening, but it detects many nodules that are not cancerous, leading to more invasive and risky treatment. A recent study found that nodules were detected in more than 70 percent of those screened, while lung cancer was found in less than three percent.

We talk about how devastating this disease is all the time, but we still dont have a screening system in place that can detect lung cancer early, without exposing patients to the risks of biopsy and surgery, Patz said. This study is an important step in the right direction.

The researchers will next perform a larger study looking at the use of biomarkers prospectively in patients found to have lung lesions by CT scan. The ultimate goal is to develop a screening system by which patients could have the blood test before imaging and those found to be in a high risk bin would have a CT scan for further evaluation.

We would determine whether the person is at low or high risk of having lung cancer based on these biomarkers, Patz said. Patients at low risk might be followed with further blood tests or imaging studies while those at high risk might require immediate intervention.

Lung cancer is the leading killer of men and women in the United States, with nearly 175,000 people diagnosed each year, and about 160,000 patients dying from the disease yearly. More than 75 percent of lung cancer patients have already experienced significant disease spread by the time they are diagnosed, making the need for early detection techniques imperative.


Contact: Lauren Shaftel Williams
Duke University Medical Center

Related medicine news :

1. Penn study finds pro-death proteins required to regulate healthy immune function
2. New study shows promise in reducing surgical risks associated with surgical bleeding
3. Study, meta-analysis examine factors associated with death from heatstroke
4. Study suggests loss of 2 types of neurons -- not just 1 -- triggers Parkinsons symptoms
5. Study says COPD testing is not measuring up
6. Preclinical study suggests organ-transplant drug may aid in lupus fight
7. Ability to cope with stress can increase good cholesterol in older white men, study finds
8. High alcohol consumption increases stroke risk, Tulane study says
9. Mailman School of Public Health study examines link between racial discrimination and substance use
10. Pitt study finds inequality in tobacco advertising
11. Stanford study highlights cost-effective method of lowering heart disease risks
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... ... (AUC), European Union (EU), ANDI Pan African Centres of Excellence, and public R&D ... Nairobi (UNON) for the opening of the 5th African Network for Drugs and ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... According to an article published November ... more widely heralded as a breakthrough for performing hernia repairs. The article explains that ... surgery is that it can greatly reduce the pain that a patient might otherwise ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... On November 25, 2015, ... for the Narconon network, announced the release of a new cutting edge recovery program ... organization has been working with drug- and alcohol-addicted individuals with the purpose to free ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... On November 23rd 2015 Cozy ... personal heating products business. Cozy Products explains what this means for business moving ... well with the Cozy Products business model: to sell personal heaters that reduce energy ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Beddit® has launched a new Android app for ... features a more intuitive SleepScoreā„¢ that rates sleep quality on a 100-point scale and ... created by a proprietary algorithm. Beddit analyzes the data to provide an easy to ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... November 26, 2015 ... addition of the  "2016 Future Horizons ... Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) Market: Supplier ... Emerging Opportunities"  report to their offering.  ... announced the addition of the  "2016 ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... 2015 Research and Markets ( ... "2016 Future Horizons and Growth Strategies in the ... Country Segment Forecasts, Competitive Intelligence, Emerging Opportunities" ... --> --> This new 247-page ... therapeutic drug monitoring market, including emerging tests, technologies, ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... DUBLIN , Nov. 25, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... announced the addition of the "Global ... to their offering. --> ... "Global Brain Monitoring Devices Market 2015-2019" ... Research and Markets ( ) ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: