Navigation Links
Study overturns common assumption about knee replacements in morbidly obese individuals
Date:11/10/2012

After total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, patients who are morbidly obese have similar pain and function outcomes as patients who do not fall into this weight category, according to a new study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery. The finding is surprising given that numerous studies have shown that obese patients have worse outcomes. The study will be reported at the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals, to be held Nov. 9-14, in Washington D.C.

"As long as they are medically appropriate for surgery, even obese people can have excellent results from joint replacement. Obesity, in and of itself, should not be viewed as an absolute contraindication to joint replacement," said Lisa Mandl, M.D., M.P.H.., a rheumatologist at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS), in New York City, who was involved with the study.

"We undertook the study because we are in the midst of an obesity epidemic," said Susan Goodman, M.D., a rheumatologist at HSS, who led the study. Until now, many studies examining TKRs in obese patients have lumped all patients with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 and higher into one category. "In my mind, there is clearly a difference in a patient with a BMI of 40, the morbidly obese, versus an obese patient with a BMI of 33," said Dr. Goodman. "We wanted to see if we could identify a difference in outcomes among those patients, and we found that the morbidly obese had just as good outcomes."

Overweight individuals are prone to developing osteoarthritis because the extra weight adds extra wear and tear on joints. An obese individual often requires a TKR decades before a patient who is of normal weight will require one.

To conduct their research, the HSS researchers turned to the HSS Total Joint Replacement Registry, a prospective registry started in 2007 that includes, among other things, data on all patients who seek care at HSS for knee replacement surgery. They identified all patients with a BMI greater than 18.5 who had undergone a TKR between July 2007 and June 2009. Patient pain and function had been assessed prior to surgery and two years after surgery using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). The WOMAC measures pain, stiffness, and functional limitation. It is one of the more widely used tools for measuring outcomes after TKR.

The investigators found that two years after surgery, pain and function scores improved across all BMI categories and as BMI rose, patient improvements increased. Patients with a BMI greater than 40 showed the most improvement.

"The morbidly obese did well in terms of their pain and function outcomes. They start out in a much worse situation and then by two years, they are pretty much caught up," said Dr. Goodman. "I was surprised, because my expectation was that they wouldn't do as well, their functional outcomes wouldn't be as good, and they wouldn't be as satisfied. But, it turns out that they were really quite satisfied."

Dr. Goodman said that many surgeons have concerns about performing knee replacements in the morbidly obese. Almost 90% of referring physicians believe that obesity increases the likelihood of poor outcomes after a TKR.

"There is no question that the morbidly obese are a more difficult group to managethey are more likely to have a significant number of comorbidities, including cardiac disease," said Dr. Goodman. "If you look at the Deyo comorbidity scale of the patients in our study, the morbidly obese had a significantly greater number of comorbidities than normal, so they were definitely sicker to start with, but their outcomes were just as good."

In a multivariate analysis, the researchers identified a number of other factors that correlated with pain outcomes after surgery. They found that individuals who were Caucasian experienced less pain, and individuals who were female or had only a high school education had worse pain and function two years after surgery. Patients who were between the ages of 61 to 70 had less pain than those who were younger than 60. The researchers say that more research is needed to flush out why these factors play a role in recovery.

"It's surprising to learn that a patient's level of education has a greater influence on their outcome and satisfaction than obesity does," said Mark Figgie, M.D., an orthopedic surgeon and Chief of the Surgical Arthritis Service at HSS.
'/>"/>

Contact: Phyllis Fisher
phylils.fisher@gmail.com
212-606-1724
Hospital for Special Surgery
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Study Suggests Vaccine May Help Kids With Brain Cancer
2. Study reveals how cancer drug causes diabetic-like state
3. Coffee Drinking in Pregnancy Wont Lead to Sleepless Baby: Study
4. Lower GI problems plague many with rheumatoid arthritis, Mayo Clinic study finds
5. Veggies Like Broccoli, Cabbage May Help Fight Breast Cancer: Study
6. No Added Cancer Risk From Hip Replacement Materials: Study
7. Reported Decline in U.S. Pneumonia Deaths May Be False: Study
8. Early Study Finds Some Promise for Lung Cancer Vaccine
9. Narcissists Often Ace Job Interviews, Study Finds
10. Sexual objectification of female artists in music videos exists regardless of race, MU study finds
11. Soy may alleviate hot flashes in menopause, large-scale study finds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/10/2016)... York, NY (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... campaign to celebrate and raise awareness of Nestlé KITKAT as the first global confectionery ... the lives of cocoa farmers and the quality of their product, through activities that ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... to expand dental health services to the developmentally disabled in the Coachella Valley. ... operations to a new facility at 71-949 Highway 111, Suite 100-B, in Rancho ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... Washington (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... access and Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) within Healthcare, recently partnered with Heart ... remote interpreting (VRI). , For nearly 23 years, Heart City Health Center has ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... a master charity program created to assist the local community. Pledging to select ... leaders and nonprofit organizations in the area. Their goal is to bring community ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... Valley , announces that his office is now offering a variety of comprehensive ... enhancement, chin enhancement, eyebrow lift, facial volume restoration, lip enhancement and nasal reshaping. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)...   Genomic Health, Inc. (Nasdaq: GHDX ) today ... ended December 31, 2015. --> --> ... compared with $69.1 million in the fourth quarter of 2014, an ... 9 percent compared with the same period in the prior year. ... $63.9 million in the fourth quarter of 2015, an increase of ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... Vanda Pharmaceuticals Inc. (Vanda) (NASDAQ: VNDA ... fourth quarter and full year ended December 31, 2015. ... was a transformational year for Vanda with the continued ... market approval of HETLIOZ for Non-24," said Mihael H. ... Fanapt to our U.S. product portfolio builds on this ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... , February 10, 2016 ... Analyzers (Liquid & Gas), and Spectroscopy Market by Industry (Oil ... Beverage, Pulp & Paper, Metal & Mining, and Others), ... MarketsandMarkets, the global market is expected to grow to ... of 8.6% between 2015 and 2020. Browse ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: