Navigation Links
Study identifies protein essential for normal heart function
Date:6/17/2013

A study by researchers at Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Department of Pharmacology at the University of California, San Diego, shows that a protein called MCL-1, which promotes cell survival, is essential for normal heart function.

Their study, published in the June 15 online issue of the journal Genes & Development, found that deletion of the gene encoding MCL-1 in adult mouse hearts led to rapid heart failure within two weeks, and death within a month.

MCL-1 (myeloid cell leukemia-1) is an anti-apoptotic protein, meaning that it prevents or delays the death of a cell. It is also a member of the BCL-2 family of proteins that regulate mitochondria the cell's power producers and cell death. Aberrant expression of anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members is one of the defining features of cancer cells, and is strongly associated with resistance to current therapies. Thus, these proteins are currently major targets in the development of new therapies for patients with cancer.

But, while MCL-1 is up regulated in a number of human cancers, contributing to the overgrowth of cancer cells, it is found at high levels in normal heart tissue. Additionally, the researchers found that autophagy a process which deals with mitochondrial maintenance and is normally induced by myocardial stress was impaired in mice with MCL-1 deficient hearts.

In summary, the study demonstrated that the loss of MCL-1 led to rapid dysfunction of mitochondria, impaired autophagy and heart failure, even in the absence of cardiac stress.

"Cardiac injury, such as a heart attack, causes levels of MCL-1 to drop in the heart, and this process may increase cardiac cell death," said sa B. Gustafsson, PhD, an associate professor at UCSD Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. "Therefore, preserving normal levels of this protein in cardiac tissue could reduce damage after a heart attack and prevent progression to heart failure."

By compromising both autophagy and mitochondrial function, MCL-1 inhibitors are likely to affect the cells' energy supply. "Our findings raise concerns about the potential cardiac toxicity of drugs that block MCL-1 drugs that have entered clinical trials because they increase cancer cell death," said the study's first author, Robert L. Thomas.


'/>"/>

Contact: Debra Kain
ddkain@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Study finds racial and ethnic disparities in usage of specialty services for children with autism
2. Study Finds Individuals with Arthritis Don’t Walk Enough, Allsup Reports
3. Older patients will make lifestyle changes to avoid fractures, study finds
4. Loopholes in Federally Mandated IVF Reporting Lead Some Clinics to Artificially Inflate IVF Pregnancy Rates, Center for Human Reproduction Study Reports
5. Study Shows Alcohol Abusers Cannot Depend on Their Designated Drivers
6. UF study finds brain-imaging technique can help diagnose movement disorders
7. First major study of suicide motivations to advance prevention
8. Insurance Service Center Discusses a Recent Health Study and Encourages the Wisconsin Community to Purchase Adequate Health Coverage to Avoid a Financial Disaster
9. Study Identifies Most Effective Natural Bed Bug Killer
10. Clearwater, FL Periodontist, Dr. Stephen Kobernick Cites Recent Periodontal Study Urging Patients to Seek Gum Disease Treatment
11. Self-defense training for Kenyan girls reduces rape, Stanford/Packard study finds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:7/21/2017)... ... July 21, 2017 , ... ... a $5,000 grant from the C. R. Bard Foundation, Inc. to ... Somerset Hills , a service available through the nonprofit home care agency. Using ...
(Date:7/21/2017)... ... July 21, 2017 , ... West Dermatology is pleased to announce the newest ... 17, 2017, Ms. Vu will join West Dermatology’s large network of medical and cosmetic ... skin cancer , and more. She graduated from the University of Florida College of ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... , ... July 20, 2017 , ... TransPixel Volume 2 ... two clips in the FCPX timeline. This effect isolates horizontal and vertical lines of ... package contains either a rotating or flipping animation and can be changed using a ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... ... July 20, 2017 , ... ... Houston, is pleased to announce their expansion to the Midwest with the establishment ... Alysse Hollis and Ronald Bell, and of counsels, John Peck and Robert Bruns, ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... ... July 20, 2017 , ... Doctors on Liens, the leading ... Horine Chiropractic , directed by Dr. Russell Horine, DC to their exclusive list ... run with Dr. Russell Horine serving as the clinic director and his son Dr. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:7/11/2017)... 2017  Sysmex America, Inc., a leading provider ... as well as middleware information systems technology, today ... quality assurance easier and more risk free than ... for the innovation that it delivers to the ... assurance processes to a new level with automated, ...
(Date:7/10/2017)... , July 10, 2017  BDI Group ... and patient support services organization serving specialty pharmacies, ... the launch of four significant, value-added member programs ... insights, better manage reimbursement and improve access and ... factor therapies. ...
(Date:7/5/2017)... , July 5, 2017 Oramed ... www.oramed.com ), a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company focused on ... it has received approval from the Israel Securities Authority to ... (TASE). Oramed common stock will commence trading on the TASE ... the current market capitalization of the Company, it is expected ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: